You might recall that Wargaming worked to help restore the last known German Dornier 17 light bomber.  Well, now they are working to restore a Russian Panzerkampfwagen VIII Maus Super-Heavy tank with the Kubinka Museum.   If you are a tank enthusiast then you know that the Maus is considered to be one of the most powerful (and heavy!) tanks ever conceived.  Let’s see how Wargaming is teaming up to restore this powerful weapon.

“Wargaming closely cooperates with military museums around the world,” said Andrei Yarantsau, VP of Publishing at Wargaming. “We are excited to contribute to the Kubinka’s initiative and plan on supporting the museum in future. We’ll help it put together an exclusive collection of armored warfare, assisting it in lifting and reconstruction of legendary military vehicles and enriching its exhibition with renowned machines from private collections from across the world. A unique selection of legendary warfare will attract military enthusiasts from Russia and abroad, sparking interest towards military history and inspiring younger generations to learn more about their country’s past.”

Regarded as the epitome of excellent tank design, the colossal Panzerkampfwagen VIII Maus is the heaviest, fully enclosed armored fighting vehicle to see completion during World War II. Weighing 188 tonnes, only two prototypes were ever completed. The sole surviving tank is housed at the Kubinka Museum with an empty hull.

The museum and Wargaming intend to re-build its interior from scratch based on authentic diagrams. Missing parts will be restored in single quantities at a number of tank-building plants, with the entire process supervised by experienced warfare instaurators. The conserved Maus will be stored at the Kubinka Museum so that people from all over the world may come see the renowned vehicle with their own eyes.

I would *love* to see this thing in person, but for now we’ll have to settle for the video and picture of the Maus I’ve got for you today.   Enjoy, and thanks again to Wargaming for helping to preserve this piece of history.