At the time of this review, it is very difficult to get your hands on a Playstation 3.  We are only a few days past the launch of the system, and early attach rates (how many items were purchased in addition to the unit itself) have been an abysmal 1.5 units.  I can tell you what title people are picking up to raise that attach rate without doing a single bit of research

Sony has been shouting from the rooftops how powerful their system is.  Like any good launch title, Resistance: Fall of Man does a good job of giving us a taste of what developers have learned thus far, as well as giving us a glimpse of the potential for the system.  Since Resistance: Fall of Man takes place in an alternate timeline during the 50s, it is essentially set in the World War II environment. I wouldn


The controls for Resistance: Fall of Man are fairly standard fare.  You use the left and right analog to move and aim, the R2 switches weapons, and R1 fires them.  L1 handles alternate fire, while L2 makes you crouch.  X is jump and Triangle serves as both melee attack and an action button.  O tosses the selected grenade type and Square reloads.  The D pad cycles through your grenade types, as well as turning your spotlight on and off.  R3 rounds out the controls by allowing you to zoom your weapon.  While all of this is straight forward, it is when the Sixaxis controller comes into play that the controls get fun.


Knife, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Machine Gun, Bigger Machine Gun, Rocket Launcher, Uberweapon.  This has to be the most tired linear progression model of giving players new weapons, but so many developers insist on using it.  Thankfully, this game is made by Insomniac

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