A SRPG Dark Hero is Born


The PSP has become a powerhouse for Strategy Role Playing Games (SRPG). It’s a great time to own Sony’s handheld with titles such as Final Fantasy Tactics: War of the Lions, Jeanne D’Arc, and Disgaea, and with the release of Disgaea 2: Dark Hero Days we get another stellar SRPG for the system. This latest Disgaea game is a port of the PS2 version, entitled DIsgaea 2: Cursed Memories, which was released in 2006 in North America. It

Not Lost in Translation


I do have to compliment the localization team on their efforts to translate the script and humor for the western audience. Last week I reviewed Mana Khemia 2 and I was really turned off by the fact that the humor in the game wasn

Battle Strategy


The battle system in Disgaea 2 is really deep. It has a learning curve, but with a little bit of practice and trial and error, most gamers will be able to master it fairly quick. Like most SRPGs, battles take place on a 3D grid map. Typical fights have your party beginning on one side of the map, with the enemy party starting on the opposite side. Combat is then turn based with your entire party going first, followed by the enemy

Another layer of strategy is added by the Geo effect system. Geo effects are crystals present on almost every battle field that buff certain areas of the field. If a character is standing on an area that is affected by the Geo they will receive whatever buff that Geo is giving. For this reason it is either crucial to control the areas that are affected or destroy the Geos so the enemy does not receive the buff.  In addition, you can pick up and throw the Geos, this will cause the affected area to move. The buffs can include increased armor, increased damage, and even invincibility, so controlling the Geos is a crucial element to each map.


Massive Character Class System


Disgaea 2 features a massive number of player classes to choose from. As I talked about before, existing party characters can recruit new characters into the party. At first there are just a handful of classes available, but as you defeat enemies in the game their class becomes available to recruit. This means that there are literally dozens upon dozens of classes that you can choose from, each with their own set of powers and strengths. The possible party combinations are staggering.

Using a character in battle is the only way to level them up. So while the idea of having one of every class in your party may sound appealing, it simply isn If there is one complaint I have with Disgaea 2, it