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 31 
 on: February 27, 2015, 09:56:47 PM 
Started by Bullwinkle - Last post by Teggy
I see white/gold, but I have no argument that the dress is actually blue/black. I mean, it is, there are other pictures of it.

I'm curious as to why different people see it differently. I've read I guess 2 different explanations, one that is biological (the rods/cones thing) and another that seems to revolve around perception/psychology. I'd like to know which is right.

I've heard other people say that it has changed to black/blue for them, which suggests some psychological aspect to it, but no matter how many times I see the picture - rotated, tilted, color corrected, whatever, I always see it gold and white.

 32 
 on: February 27, 2015, 09:34:04 PM 
Started by Bullwinkle - Last post by wonderpug

Quote from: Bullwinkle on February 27, 2015, 09:25:50 PM

It's not at all pointless. It is mind-bogglingly fascinating.

The thing that gets me is how so few people are able to say "oh yeah, I guess I can see it that other way."  Almost everyone firmly thinks their way is the one true way and it boggles their mind how anyone can see anything different.

 33 
 on: February 27, 2015, 09:25:50 PM 
Started by Bullwinkle - Last post by Bullwinkle

Quote from: Lee on February 27, 2015, 08:27:51 PM

Quote from: EngineNo9 on February 27, 2015, 07:57:18 PM

The argument isn't over the exact pixel color values of the image, it's about the color of the dress in reality.

As I have said twice, the real dress is blue. Its been mentioned in articles. The dress is on even sold on Amazon.

You must be exhausted, saying it so many times.

The argument is not at all over what the color of the dress is in reality.

The discussion is over what our perceptions are of the dress in that picture.

Quote from: EngineNo9 on February 27, 2015, 06:22:55 PM

The problem with this is without another picture it's just a pointless argument.  It needs real resolution to be satisfying to me.

It's not at all pointless. It is mind-bogglingly fascinating.

 34 
 on: February 27, 2015, 09:22:22 PM 
Started by Bullwinkle - Last post by EngineNo9
To me, this proves the "white gold in true sunlight, bluish and darker brown in shade", but to my buddy who sees it as blue/black he thinks it proves the opposite.

https://vine.co/v/O2rvPnlEzqi

 35 
 on: February 27, 2015, 08:27:51 PM 
Started by Bullwinkle - Last post by Lee

Quote from: EngineNo9 on February 27, 2015, 07:57:18 PM

The argument isn't over the exact pixel color values of the image, it's about the color of the dress in reality.

As I have said twice, the real dress is blue. Its been mentioned in articles. The dress is on even sold on Amazon.

 36 
 on: February 27, 2015, 08:26:49 PM 
Started by EngineNo9 - Last post by Rumpy

Quote from: raydude on February 27, 2015, 01:08:30 PM

I've found that it's frequently not the cashier who holds up the line, it's the customer. Particularly if they're paying with cash or a check. It's like, they know they're going to pay with a check so can't they just open the checkbook while waiting and fill out the stuff they know in advance? Like the date and the store's name? Or, if they know they'll be paying with cash they can at least estimate to to the nearest twenty and get that money ready?

Over here, it's debit that slows things down. A technology that was supposed to speed things up, but ends up holding things back, because everyone is waiting for you to enter your number and for the system to clear.

 37 
 on: February 27, 2015, 08:20:30 PM 
Started by Caine - Last post by Destructor

Quote from: Caine on February 27, 2015, 05:51:50 PM



"Of my friend, I can only say this: of all the souls I have encountered in my travels, his was the most... human."

 38 
 on: February 27, 2015, 08:07:34 PM 
Started by Bullwinkle - Last post by Lordnine

Quote from: wonderpug on February 27, 2015, 08:00:32 PM

Quote from: EngineNo9 on February 27, 2015, 07:57:18 PM

Pug, that test doesn't really make any sense and I hope it's a joke. 

Yes, the true chromatic color of the pixel may be light blue, but that says nothing about the true original color of the real article in shaded sunlight.

The argument isn't over the exact pixel color values of the image, it's about the color of the dress in reality.

I can't wrap my head around how the white/gold population is perceiving this thing, so yes it was a real test.  I thought the white/golders might still see white/gold in at least the first image.
I see blue on brownish, which is how gold tends to look when itís not reflecting something bright.

 39 
 on: February 27, 2015, 08:00:32 PM 
Started by Bullwinkle - Last post by wonderpug

Quote from: EngineNo9 on February 27, 2015, 07:57:18 PM

Pug, that test doesn't really make any sense and I hope it's a joke. 

Yes, the true chromatic color of the pixel may be light blue, but that says nothing about the true original color of the real article in shaded sunlight.

The argument isn't over the exact pixel color values of the image, it's about the color of the dress in reality.

I can't wrap my head around how the white/gold population is perceiving this thing, so yes it was a real test.  I thought the white/golders might still see white/gold in at least the first image.

 40 
 on: February 27, 2015, 07:57:18 PM 
Started by Bullwinkle - Last post by EngineNo9
Pug, that test doesn't really make any sense and I hope it's a joke. 

Yes, the true chromatic color of the pixel may be light blue, but that says nothing about the true original color of the real article in shaded sunlight.

The argument isn't over the exact pixel color values of the image, it's about the color of the dress in reality.

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