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Author Topic: Why am I always so tired...?  (Read 1878 times)
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Arkon
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« on: April 27, 2007, 11:25:43 AM »

Well, I finally found out.  I bit the bullet and did a sleep test. It was confirmed that I have severe sleep apnea and will start using a cpap machine.  As a point of reference, severe sleep apnea means you have a minimum of 40 interuptions an hour.  My score.... 120 an hour, yes that is one every 30 seconds.  In an hour my longest block of continuos sleep was 50 seconds.  Of the 5 stages of sleep I was never progressing past the second stage.  Hopefully this machine will help me out.
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dbt1949
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« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2007, 11:31:54 AM »

I might have it too but I don't think I could use the machine so I figure why bother taking the test in my case?
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Arkon
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« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2007, 11:37:36 AM »

Quote from: dbt1949 on April 27, 2007, 11:31:54 AM

I might have it too but I don't think I could use the machine so I figure why bother taking the test in my case?

To be honest, it is a bit odd at first.  I have used the machine at the clinic and it took me about 40 minutes to fall asleep, but once asleep I didn't wake up for 6 hours.  It is well worth getting used to, not to mention from my reading I have found out that sleep apnea can be fatal.  My longest duration of not breathing during my test was 1 minute.  Many people have died from it.
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Kobra
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« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2007, 12:53:50 PM »

Quote from: Arkon on April 27, 2007, 11:25:43 AM

Well, I finally found out.  I bit the bullet and did a sleep test. It was confirmed that I have severe sleep apnea and will start using a cpap machine.  As a point of reference, severe sleep apnea means you have a minimum of 40 interuptions an hour.  My score.... 120 an hour, yes that is one every 30 seconds.  In an hour my longest block of continuos sleep was 50 seconds.  Of the 5 stages of sleep I was never progressing past the second stage.  Hopefully this machine will help me out.

Just make sure to keep the machine a fair distance from you, they give off a good amount of EMF.  Also why not treat the cause rather than the symptoms?  The obvious one would be to lose weight if you are overweight, that can provide immediate relief, just 10lbs even.  Also examine and remove any electrical devices or cell phones near your bedside keeping them 5 feet from your body or switch to battery devices.  People need to sleep in EMF/EMR free environments for true deep sleep and more often than not, I find people that lack good deep sleep tend to have stuff like clock radios, cell phones and other stuff on their nightstands.  It really does make a difference.
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Arkon
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« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2007, 02:11:29 PM »

Quote from: Kobra on April 27, 2007, 12:53:50 PM

Quote from: Arkon on April 27, 2007, 11:25:43 AM

Well, I finally found out.  I bit the bullet and did a sleep test. It was confirmed that I have severe sleep apnea and will start using a cpap machine.  As a point of reference, severe sleep apnea means you have a minimum of 40 interuptions an hour.  My score.... 120 an hour, yes that is one every 30 seconds.  In an hour my longest block of continuos sleep was 50 seconds.  Of the 5 stages of sleep I was never progressing past the second stage.  Hopefully this machine will help me out.

Just make sure to keep the machine a fair distance from you, they give off a good amount of EMF.  Also why not treat the cause rather than the symptoms?  The obvious one would be to lose weight if you are overweight, that can provide immediate relief, just 10lbs even.  Also examine and remove any electrical devices or cell phones near your bedside keeping them 5 feet from your body or switch to battery devices.  People need to sleep in EMF/EMR free environments for true deep sleep and more often than not, I find people that lack good deep sleep tend to have stuff like clock radios, cell phones and other stuff on their nightstands.  It really does make a difference.

Kobra, my apnea unfortunately isn't tied to my weight entirely.  When I was 7 years old and weighed in at 47 pounds (I was a tiny child) I had all the same symptoms as I have now, was a very very bad snorer, always tired etc.  I had apnea way before I put on a few extra pounds.  Evidentally my apnea is mixed apnea which means it is partly due to my throat and tongue muscles relaxing and becoming an obstruction and my brain which fails to signal my muscles to breath.  I use a battery powered clock and no cell phones in the room.  Only electrical devices in the room are lights.

I understand treating the cause, which I will be working at loosing some weight, but even if I drop 50 pounds I will still be above the threshold for severe sleep apnea according to the doctors.  They have very much recommended I loose to weight for multiple reasons.
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mytocles
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« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2007, 03:35:18 PM »

Wow, Arkon! so glad you found out the cause... that must have been a bit disturbing getting those results, just incredible!  I know there is surgery for one of your two issues, but if the brain still isn't sending the signals properly, I'm assuming that would do you little, or no, good.

I've considered the same test, because not only has my muscle disorder weakened all those muscles, but I have to take muscle relaxers at night  (talk about your lose/ lose).  Right now I've just had too many other issues to deal with, and I'm certain that my (possible) apnea state is not even close to the level of yours.  The other problem is that I have so much trouble falling asleep and staying asleep now, from muscle pain, that I'm not sure I could overcome the use of the CPAP. 

Keep us posted, please.... I'm still marveling that you had it so long, just now finding out you could have died from it - yikes!   eek
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Arkon
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« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2007, 03:44:14 PM »

Quote from: mytocles on April 27, 2007, 03:35:18 PM

Wow, Arkon! so glad you found out the cause... that must have been a bit disturbing getting those results, just incredible!  I know there is surgery for one of your two issues, but if the brain still isn't sending the signals properly, I'm assuming that would do you little, or no, good.

I've considered the same test, because not only has my muscle disorder weakened all those muscles, but I have to take muscle relaxers at night  (talk about your lose/ lose).  Right now I've just had too many other issues to deal with, and I'm certain that my (possible) apnea state is not even close to the level of yours.  The other problem is that I have so much trouble falling asleep and staying asleep now, from muscle pain, that I'm not sure I could overcome the use of the CPAP. 

Keep us posted, please.... I'm still marveling that you had it so long, just now finding out you could have died from it - yikes!   eek

Thanks for the encouragement Myto.  As a point of reference.. when I was 7, my snoring was so bad that my dad could here me snoring when he got out of his truck when he got home from work when working second turn.  He parked 30 feet from the house.  When I was 19 I had surgery to remove tonsils, adnoids (still had them even though I wasn't supposed to) and to correct a deviated septum that caused my right nostril to be 95% blocked.  I honestly thought I was constantly tired due to my depression, but then I realized even on my good days I was still tired beyond belief.
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Kobra
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« Reply #7 on: April 27, 2007, 04:19:44 PM »

Quote from: Arkon on April 27, 2007, 02:11:29 PM

Quote from: Kobra on April 27, 2007, 12:53:50 PM

Quote from: Arkon on April 27, 2007, 11:25:43 AM

Well, I finally found out.  I bit the bullet and did a sleep test. It was confirmed that I have severe sleep apnea and will start using a cpap machine.  As a point of reference, severe sleep apnea means you have a minimum of 40 interuptions an hour.  My score.... 120 an hour, yes that is one every 30 seconds.  In an hour my longest block of continuos sleep was 50 seconds.  Of the 5 stages of sleep I was never progressing past the second stage.  Hopefully this machine will help me out.

Just make sure to keep the machine a fair distance from you, they give off a good amount of EMF.  Also why not treat the cause rather than the symptoms?  The obvious one would be to lose weight if you are overweight, that can provide immediate relief, just 10lbs even.  Also examine and remove any electrical devices or cell phones near your bedside keeping them 5 feet from your body or switch to battery devices.  People need to sleep in EMF/EMR free environments for true deep sleep and more often than not, I find people that lack good deep sleep tend to have stuff like clock radios, cell phones and other stuff on their nightstands.  It really does make a difference.

Kobra, my apnea unfortunately isn't tied to my weight entirely.  When I was 7 years old and weighed in at 47 pounds (I was a tiny child) I had all the same symptoms as I have now, was a very very bad snorer, always tired etc.  I had apnea way before I put on a few extra pounds.  Evidentally my apnea is mixed apnea which means it is partly due to my throat and tongue muscles relaxing and becoming an obstruction and my brain which fails to signal my muscles to breath.  I use a battery powered clock and no cell phones in the room.  Only electrical devices in the room are lights.

I understand treating the cause, which I will be working at loosing some weight, but even if I drop 50 pounds I will still be above the threshold for severe sleep apnea according to the doctors.  They have very much recommended I loose to weight for multiple reasons.

Wow, this is good news then you are seeking treatment.. I figured you were the type to examine causes first, and in this case, the machine seems like a great idea!  Get longer tubes for the machine though.  My father in-law has his machine right next to his head practically, and I tested over 24.0mG coming off it.  Considering the US Government says anything over 1.0mG during sleep is bad news, umm, that was tragic.  Hes stubborn though, and refuses to move it..  Nothing I can do under those cases.
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Arkon
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« Reply #8 on: April 27, 2007, 04:24:56 PM »

Quote from: Kobra on April 27, 2007, 04:19:44 PM

Quote from: Arkon on April 27, 2007, 02:11:29 PM

Quote from: Kobra on April 27, 2007, 12:53:50 PM

Quote from: Arkon on April 27, 2007, 11:25:43 AM

Well, I finally found out.  I bit the bullet and did a sleep test. It was confirmed that I have severe sleep apnea and will start using a cpap machine.  As a point of reference, severe sleep apnea means you have a minimum of 40 interuptions an hour.  My score.... 120 an hour, yes that is one every 30 seconds.  In an hour my longest block of continuos sleep was 50 seconds.  Of the 5 stages of sleep I was never progressing past the second stage.  Hopefully this machine will help me out.

Just make sure to keep the machine a fair distance from you, they give off a good amount of EMF.  Also why not treat the cause rather than the symptoms?  The obvious one would be to lose weight if you are overweight, that can provide immediate relief, just 10lbs even.  Also examine and remove any electrical devices or cell phones near your bedside keeping them 5 feet from your body or switch to battery devices.  People need to sleep in EMF/EMR free environments for true deep sleep and more often than not, I find people that lack good deep sleep tend to have stuff like clock radios, cell phones and other stuff on their nightstands.  It really does make a difference.

Kobra, my apnea unfortunately isn't tied to my weight entirely.  When I was 7 years old and weighed in at 47 pounds (I was a tiny child) I had all the same symptoms as I have now, was a very very bad snorer, always tired etc.  I had apnea way before I put on a few extra pounds.  Evidentally my apnea is mixed apnea which means it is partly due to my throat and tongue muscles relaxing and becoming an obstruction and my brain which fails to signal my muscles to breath.  I use a battery powered clock and no cell phones in the room.  Only electrical devices in the room are lights.

I understand treating the cause, which I will be working at loosing some weight, but even if I drop 50 pounds I will still be above the threshold for severe sleep apnea according to the doctors.  They have very much recommended I loose to weight for multiple reasons.

Wow, this is good news then you are seeking treatment.. I figured you were the type to examine causes first, and in this case, the machine seems like a great idea!  Get longer tubes for the machine though.  My father in-law has his machine right next to his head practically, and I tested over 24.0mG coming off it.  Considering the US Government says anything over 1.0mG during sleep is bad news, umm, that was tragic.  Hes stubborn though, and refuses to move it..  Nothing I can do under those cases.

The tubes for my machine are 6 feet roughly, will check to see if they have longer ones.
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Kobra
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« Reply #9 on: April 27, 2007, 04:57:49 PM »

6 feet allotting for movement, means the machine will probably be on your nightstand. Not far enough away I would think.  Maybe go for 10-12 foot tubes to play it safe.  Those pumps run all night long and put out some pretty big EMF.
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« Reply #10 on: April 27, 2007, 05:17:23 PM »

I was the same way until a couple years ago when I had the sleep study too.  I was just as bad...and actually was considered bad enough that the CPAP machine was bypassed and I went straight to surgical options.  I had some upper palate removed, tonsils removed (I was also a strep carrier), and a deviated septum fixed.  I was also one of those that other people could hear snoring from the other side of the house and also a very deep sleeper.  It was getting so bad at one point that I was dozing off driving home (and would have to take naps at lunchtime) even though I was sleeping 9-10 hours a night.

It's an unbelievable difference.  It took about 2 weeks to get over the pain (I had an IV on the third day due to the complete inability to eat or drink anything) but after that I'm a new person.  I sleep better, my mood and memory is better, I sleep less and feel more rested and I no longer snore. 
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coopasonic
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« Reply #11 on: April 27, 2007, 05:39:30 PM »

Curiousity here, for you guys that have had surgery, etc, was it all covered under insurance? I'm seriously getting a sleep study done, but haven't go so far as to talk to my insurance carrier about it. Also, I think I'll wait til next month when I switch to a more comprehensive plan. I know I have a deviated septum, but I don't know if there is more behind it.
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« Reply #12 on: April 27, 2007, 07:42:27 PM »

I was reading in Men's Health that there is now a pillow that is an effective treatment for some people with sleep apnea.  You have to sleep on your side and it puts your head at the right angle to keep the airway open.  I don't recall the name of the pillow, but I can look it up when I get home.
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Arkon
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« Reply #13 on: April 27, 2007, 08:39:55 PM »

I am sure it depends on your insurance.  For my sleep study and CPAP it is all covered through my insurance.  Thankfully the CPAP at a high enough pressure was able to correct my apnea and snoring. 
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« Reply #14 on: April 27, 2007, 08:43:28 PM »

Good luck - I've been using a CPAP off and on for a month.  Haven't noticed a big difference yet, but I'm still having trouble keeping the thing on all night... it starts shifting on my head and becomes very distracting after a few hours.  But I've stopped snoring, so that's the main thing (at least according to the missus)
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Arkon
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« Reply #15 on: April 27, 2007, 08:54:47 PM »

Quote from: Laner on April 27, 2007, 08:43:28 PM

Good luck - I've been using a CPAP off and on for a month.  Haven't noticed a big difference yet, but I'm still having trouble keeping the thing on all night... it starts shifting on my head and becomes very distracting after a few hours.  But I've stopped snoring, so that's the main thing (at least according to the missus)

Laner, what type of mask do you have?  Mine is a comfort gel mask, that covers just my nose.  Using it at the clinic I had no problems with it shifting but it did irritate my upper lip since I have a moustache.  Perhaps you can look into a different style of mask?
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« Reply #16 on: April 27, 2007, 09:11:30 PM »

I have the same style, medium size.  I'm considering switching to the smaller size to see if that makes a difference.
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« Reply #17 on: April 27, 2007, 09:50:00 PM »

I had a basic HMO at the time and it was covered...mostly because I had a specialist and a couple doctors on my side (as well as the sleep study results).  They did say it was pretty rare for the insurance to bypass the CPAP and go straight to surgery but that it does happen for bad cases.

Yes the surgery was bad...for weeks it was bad and the first week was one of the worst in my life.  But once it was over my entire life was better...sleeping and awake.  Good luck with the CPAP...I know people who use it and it really makes a difference once it's fitted correctly and you get used to sleeping with it.
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Kobra
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« Reply #18 on: April 27, 2007, 10:32:46 PM »

Quote from: Teggy on April 27, 2007, 07:42:27 PM

I was reading in Men's Health that there is now a pillow that is an effective treatment for some people with sleep apnea.  You have to sleep on your side and it puts your head at the right angle to keep the airway open.  I don't recall the name of the pillow, but I can look it up when I get home.

http://sleepdisorders.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?zi=1/XJ&sdn=sleepdisorders&zu=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.sleepposture.com%2Fpillow.html

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« Reply #19 on: April 27, 2007, 10:59:26 PM »

I have sleep apnea and had my deviated septum corrected via surgery and that is a in-n-out procedure.
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Kobra
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« Reply #20 on: April 28, 2007, 12:28:32 AM »

I snore, but I sleep like a fucking truck driver after a 3,000 mile haul..  Literally 8-9 hours of unbelievably deep sleep.  If I have apnea, I wouldn't know it because I am almost never tired.
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« Reply #21 on: April 28, 2007, 12:46:44 AM »

Wow. I just had the sleep test this week. Wires, masks, you name it. Apparently I had 317 apneas during an 8 hour study, which equates to about 45/hour. I used the CPAP the following day and it was interesting. I blogged about it last night so, if you so choose, can take a look there.

Linky
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« Reply #22 on: May 01, 2007, 02:45:40 AM »

Arkon, has it made a big difference for you yet?
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Arkon
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« Reply #23 on: May 01, 2007, 11:09:02 AM »

Well, I have slept using my CPAP machine for 5 nights now.  The first 4 nights I only made it 6 hours before needing a break from the mask.  Last night I made it almost a full 8 hours, ended up waking up 15 minutes before my alarm went off.  So far the bags under my eyes have drastically reduced in darkness.  I am also not feeling as drowsy in the middle of the day.  It will likely take me another week or two to really get the full effect.  One note... I actually had a dream last night, first time in a very very very long time I have had a dream.
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mytocles
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« Reply #24 on: May 01, 2007, 08:06:41 PM »

Quote from: Arkon on May 01, 2007, 11:09:02 AM

Well, I have slept using my CPAP machine for 5 nights now.  The first 4 nights I only made it 6 hours before needing a break from the mask.  Last night I made it almost a full 8 hours, ended up waking up 15 minutes before my alarm went off.  So far the bags under my eyes have drastically reduced in darkness.  I am also not feeling as drowsy in the middle of the day.  It will likely take me another week or two to really get the full effect.  One note... I actually had a dream last night, first time in a very very very long time I have had a dream.

Wow, Arkon that is super to hear! I'm sure if you could get used to the mask this quickly, things will only get better.  It truly must be a life-changing experience - after all these years, too!

Congrats!!  icon_razz
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« Reply #25 on: May 02, 2007, 01:30:46 PM »

BTW, this is the pillow I had read about - it is FDA approved to treat sleep apnea

http://www.sonapillow.com/

There's a woman in her underwear at the top of the site, so I guess it is mildly NSFW.  Kind of a stupid design choice.

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Arkon
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« Reply #26 on: May 02, 2007, 02:49:11 PM »

Interesting until I got to this:

Quote
• May stop or decrease snoring
• May be used as a treatment to avoid mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea.
• May improve the quality of sleep.

So there is no gurantee it will work, and it has no effect if you have severe apnea.
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« Reply #27 on: May 02, 2007, 02:56:44 PM »

Quote from: Arkon on May 02, 2007, 02:49:11 PM

Interesting until I got to this:

Quote
• May stop or decrease snoring
• May be used as a treatment to avoid mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea.
• May improve the quality of sleep.

So there is no gurantee it will work, and it has no effect if you have severe apnea.

I think it would be more that they don't want to commit to being an effective treatment for severe cases.
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Kobra
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« Reply #28 on: May 02, 2007, 03:14:27 PM »

Quote from: unbreakable on May 02, 2007, 02:56:44 PM

Quote from: Arkon on May 02, 2007, 02:49:11 PM

Interesting until I got to this:

Quote
• May stop or decrease snoring
• May be used as a treatment to avoid mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea.
• May improve the quality of sleep.

So there is no gurantee it will work, and it has no effect if you have severe apnea.

I think it would be more that they don't want to commit to being an effective treatment for severe cases.

Exactly, not to mention the FDA would shut them down in a heartbeat if someone filed a complaint that it didn't work.  You have to be VERY VAGUE when making any claims unless you are a big pharmaceutical company - if you are one of those - you can claim anything you want and not worry about it.
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