http://gamingtrend.com
September 21, 2014, 06:30:17 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Two Tablespoons? Coffee Question  (Read 1031 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Eco-Logic
Gaming Trend Member
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2960


Gamertag: St0ckBroker


View Profile
« on: March 29, 2008, 01:33:09 PM »

I am a huge coffee drinker.  I also happen to make an awful cup of coffee.

Help me out here. 

I just got a bag of coffee for my birthday and the instructions say, 2 level tablespoons for every 6 ounces of water.  So if I brew 6 cups, I would put 12 level table spoons.  That is an awful lot. 

How do you all do it? 

Chris
Logged

This signature is intentional, ie not a mistake.  If you thing Rick Perry should be forced to resign for this crap, you're part of the problem with our country.  Give me a freaking break.
gellar
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 8986


I'm a dolphin!


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2008, 02:05:24 PM »

I haven't used a drip coffee machine in a while, but I remember using actually 2 heaping tbps for every cup.  I like my coffee a bit strong.

gellar
Logged
IkeVandergraaf
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2784


RRoD FTL! F MS!


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2008, 02:53:36 PM »

Every coffee maker's a little bit different.  Keep experimenting until you get it right is the best advice I can give you.  Keep in mind that a normal sized mug of coffee is the equivalent of 2 "cups" of coffee.  Also, you're better off with good coffee and fresh cold running water.  If you buy whole bean coffee and grind your own beans every time you make coffee, it makes a gigantic difference.  An inexpensive coffee bean grinder costs around $15 and is probably the most significant investment you can make if you want better coffee at home.
Logged

Gamertag = IkeV
I KNOW DEEP IN MY NMIND THAT THIS DISGUSTING WEBSITE THAT IS OBIVOUSLY OPERATED BY HIGHSCHOOL DROPOUTS LIVING PURPOSELESS AND JOBLESS LIVES
Marik
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 62


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2008, 04:01:17 PM »

Quote from: IkeVandergraaf on March 29, 2008, 02:53:36 PM

Every coffee maker's a little bit different.  Keep experimenting until you get it right is the best advice I can give you.  Keep in mind that a normal sized mug of coffee is the equivalent of 2 "cups" of coffee.  Also, you're better off with good coffee and fresh cold running water.  If you buy whole bean coffee and grind your own beans every time you make coffee, it makes a gigantic difference.  An inexpensive coffee bean grinder costs around $15 and is probably the most significant investment you can make if you want better coffee at home.

This is dead on.  You want about 4 tablespoons/heaping tablespoons per mug of coffee.  You'll twitch a bit at first but in the end you'll thank me.
Logged
Kevin Grey
Global Moderator
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13976


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2008, 04:05:07 PM »

I typically use 5-6 heaping tablespoons for an 8 cup coffee pot (as Ike notes that really like 3 real cups of coffee). 
Logged
unbreakable
Guest
« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2008, 04:05:32 PM »

First of all, your description gave away the problem: you got a bag of coffee.

The easiest thing to do, and you will immediately notice a difference, is to get a bag of coffee beans and a grinder.  Coffee beans have oils in them, and that oil starts to degrade shortly after it's exposed to air.  So pre-ground coffee will start to taste significantly worse (and weaker!) only a few minutes after it's been ground.  The ideal scenario is where you grind the beans right before you brew.  

It's also pretty cheap: you don't necessarily have to go all-out with a $100 burr grinder.  Just get a bladed grinder, you can pick one up for about $15-20, I've seen them on sale for $10.  Now if you will be making espresso... get a burr grinder.

I'd also highly recommend getting a French Press: it's going to taste way better than drip.


BTW... that description does sounds about right, especially since they are talking level tablespoons.  But since coffee varies so much in how strong it is, just play around with how much you use and go with what you like best.  Every time I try a different kind of coffee, I have to adjust how many scoops of beans I grind.
Logged
gellar
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 8986


I'm a dolphin!


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2008, 05:05:20 PM »

Quote from: unbreakable on March 29, 2008, 04:05:32 PM

I'd also highly recommend getting a French Press: it's going to taste way better than drip.

ABSOLUTELY.  I've tossed by drip machine and make coffee via the French Press and Espresso via an Espresso maker.  The press can be a pain in the ass to clean, but the coffee out of it is well, well worth it.

gellar
Logged
Daehawk
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 11755



View Profile
« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2008, 05:37:35 PM »

Theres an episode of Good Eats hosted by Alton Brown that addresses the perfect cup of coffee. Watch that. I love that show.
Logged

---------------------------------------------------
I am Dyslexic of Borg, prepare to have your ass laminated.

Check my trader rating. Im 22+ and zero negs. Trade with me! smile
Speaker2Animals
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 240

Diplomatic Kzin


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2008, 08:28:00 PM »

(1) Another + vote for a French Press. Bit too lazy to use every time, but I def. tastes significantly better/richer. However, I vaguely recall reading some reference to some recent study that indicates an elevated health risk w/ french pressing- WTF?!?! you say, all my French Pressing brethren. But it has (allegedly) something to do with the non-filtered methods (incl. percolating, espresso, etc.) versus filtering - some "magic" aspect to filtering makes the black brew saferrerrr -or something-... I'm too lazy to actually look for that info again (or to heed it), and figure to keep on pressing now & again - but figure that same laziness is a helpful defense mechanism in that I only sometimes use the press, so the laziness will save me smile

(2) Back to OP, if dripping, I've found I prefer the coffemakers that use the cone/ #4/ little triangle shaped filters versus the "typical" flat bottom ones. Less coffee needed imho for given taste extraction... works w/ smaller/half pot/couple cups or so brews that I often do- But that "seems more efficient" thing is just a personal/anecdotal thing perhaps. But w/ your history of bad coffeemaking, perhaps worth a shot...?
Logged
Hamsterball_Z
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 228



View Profile
« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2008, 09:24:13 PM »

Quote from: Daehawk on March 29, 2008, 05:37:35 PM

Theres an episode of Good Eats hosted by Alton Brown that addresses the perfect cup of coffee. Watch that. I love that show.

I was just going to bring that up.  Here's the Cliff's Notes version from the Food Network website.

Quote
Regardless of method, brew using 2 heaping tablespoons of coffee for each 6 ounces of clean (filtered or bottled), cool water. If you prefer a milder cup, brew to full strength, and then dilute with hot water. Brewing with too little coffee will result in over-extraction, and that means bitterness.

If two tablespoons per cup sounds like too much then that last sentence tells you why your coffee sucks.   icon_smile
Logged

(HBZ)
mikeg
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2549


View Profile WWW
« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2008, 12:14:50 AM »

Besides making the coffee, what do you put in yours AFTER you get it?  Nothing.  Cream and sugar.  Halfnhalf.  International Coffee's Vanilla flavoring.  What?
Logged

I am Xboxalot on Live.
Eco-Logic
Gaming Trend Member
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2960


Gamertag: St0ckBroker


View Profile
« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2008, 03:53:22 AM »

Quote from: mikeg on March 30, 2008, 12:14:50 AM

Besides making the coffee, what do you put in yours AFTER you get it?  Nothing.  Cream and sugar.  Halfnhalf.  International Coffee's Vanilla flavoring.  What?

Nothing, Black is best.

Today after reading this thread I followed the directions on the bag (you're right about grinding being better I am sure, I will start grinding again).  I put two level table spoons for every 6 ounces of cold filtered water. 

The coffee came out perfect. 

The link to the food network site is awesome, thank you for that.  I have had coffee from a French press before and it was very good, but in the morning time, anything that takes any additional effort will likely be skipped (with me stopping by Starbucks or somewhere instead). 

Great advice you all, thanks so much.  I have bookmarked this thread in case I relapse.

Chris
Logged

This signature is intentional, ie not a mistake.  If you thing Rick Perry should be forced to resign for this crap, you're part of the problem with our country.  Give me a freaking break.
unbreakable
Guest
« Reply #12 on: March 31, 2008, 04:30:35 PM »

Here is a really good guide to using a press pot.
Logged
Z-Corn
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 99


View Profile
« Reply #13 on: April 05, 2008, 12:44:04 PM »

There is only one way to make coffee:

Use 7 grams (by weight, buy a scale!) per 6-8 oz water (195-203 degrees Fahrenheit) in all brewing methods.  It's an exact science...
Logged
Alefroth
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 686



View Profile
« Reply #14 on: April 05, 2008, 03:28:21 PM »

Quote from: Z-Corn on April 05, 2008, 12:44:04 PM

There is only one way to make coffee:

Use 7 grams (by weight, buy a scale!) per 6-8 oz water (195-203 degrees Fahrenheit) in all brewing methods.  It's an exact science...

Apparently not...   icon_wink

Ale
« Last Edit: April 05, 2008, 03:36:59 PM by Alefroth » Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.166 seconds with 52 queries. (Pretty URLs adds 0.075s, 2q)