http://gamingtrend.com
November 26, 2014, 12:49:45 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Public speaking  (Read 269 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Lee
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3427


View Profile
« on: October 30, 2014, 10:02:47 PM »

Do you move around? Do you find it distracting when speaker do?

Three speeches in a week and in every one of them I moved around. Not pacing so much, but moving around the aisles of the classroom, stopping occasionally. I find it relaxes me and end up doing it without even thinking about it. The last speech was today, and it hit me that it was awkward that people were having to turn in their chairs to look at me. I realized I needed to stop, but I couldn't. Out of all the other speeches, not one person has left the podium, and now I am curious as to how it looks. I am not an energetic speaker even by the loosest definition, I am also an extremely dry, monotone person, so I am not a speaker who uses it for effect. (Professors never commit on it, and I get full points, but the bar is set extremely low in most classes.)

Thoughts?
« Last Edit: October 30, 2014, 10:04:24 PM by Lee » Logged
Gratch
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 12563


GO UTES!!


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2014, 11:08:10 PM »

I think that moving around is pretty much a requirement as a speaker.  I can't imagine listening to someone who stood rooted in one spot.  That said, you need to be careful how and where you move.  A good rule of thumb I've read is the "vision cone".  Hold your arms up at about a 45 degree angle and imagine they create a cone that goes outward (think of the guards in Metal Gear Solid).  You're safe to move anywhere, as long as the audience stays within that cone at all times.

Probably not explaining it very well (much easier to demonstrate), but hopefully that makes sense.
Logged

drifter
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 1253


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2014, 11:10:03 PM »

Moving around is fine but turning your back or moving behind the people unless its for effect its kind of a no-no.
Logged
Fireball
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 1621


View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2014, 12:46:48 AM »

It's natural to move around. I totally agree with drifter, just don't turn your back on anyone.

I was speaking in front of middle school classes all day today. Since the topic (the election, how Congress works, etc) wasn't entirely engaging, I tried to up my energy level a bit to keep their attention, and that involved moving around as I spoke, stepping towards the kids who were asking questions, etc. I'm not the best public speaker, though I have to do some for work, but it was fun.

The three most common questions? "Should I be worried about Ebola?" and "Have you met President Obama?"

Those seventh graders, keeping their eye on the big picture. smile
Logged

Bullwinkle
Gaming Trend Staff
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 15692


Watch me pull a rabbit outta my hat.


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2014, 03:05:08 AM »

I've done a lot of corporate events (groups as small as 50 people and as large as 5,000), and I've seen a lot of executive speeches, and I can tell you that not only is moving around something you should do, there are actually people out there who train executives to move around 'naturally" except when it's not natural, they'd probably be better off standing still.
Logged

That's like blaming owls because I suck at making analogies.
jament
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 378



View Profile
« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2014, 03:04:23 PM »

I've coached the high school speech and debate team for 20 years and practicing movement is a big part of platform speaking.

If you're trying to engage the audience in a less-formal, more personal way, then you definitely want to move away from the podium.  The podium represents a barrier between you and the audience and you step around the podium to remove that barrier.

Movement is a great idea as long as it has some purpose.  You have to be careful because your nerves can take over and turn the movement into nervous pacing, which is distracting to the audience. Shifting weight from foot to foot and swaying are distractions as well.

To prevent the movement from just looking like you're nervous, try and move naturally and with purpose.  For example, if you start your presentation behind the podium, move around the side or front of the podium during your opening/introductory comments. As you transition to your first point, move to a different area of the audience. Talk from there until you transition to your next idea, then move again. Just make sure you talk while you move and that you look natural as you walk. 

Other ideas are to reinforce your points and message with movement.  Step towards the audience when you make a point that you want them to remember.  As you move to background information or something less interesting, it's ok to turn your hips and move away from them to reset your position. As others have said, don't turn your back, but showing the audience your profile while you move to another area is fine.  You may have to compensate by raising your voice while you move.

There's such power in becoming an effective public speaker. Kudos to you for doing it.
Logged
Lee
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3427


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2014, 03:51:24 PM »

Thanks for the feedback guys. I think where I went wrong is in one class the layout was weird and I walked behind a 2 rows of people at one point. People were turning to look at me and looked to be very puzzled as to what I was doing. I didn't want them looking at me anyway, I had charts on a slide that they were supposed to be looking at as I talked about them. I think I need to apply Gratch's "vision cone" a bit more.

I always thought you were supposed to move a bit, but when I looked up public speaking yesterday, a lot of articles were saying that unless you are really good at it, it just comes across as awkward. As I said though, I felt more comfortable moving around, I think it gives me some confidence. One speech I had to control the slides without a clicker, so I had to keep going back to the computer and it completely threw me off. I lost any rhythm I had and struggled to remember what my key points were.
« Last Edit: October 31, 2014, 03:55:41 PM by Lee » Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.186 seconds with 37 queries. (Pretty URLs adds 0.038s, 2q)