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Author Topic: The Gaming Trend Cookbook (Crowdsourced nom book!)  (Read 916 times)
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Knightshade Dragon
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« on: July 19, 2013, 03:20:47 PM »

All this talk of food got me thinking...what if we did a crowdsourced cook book?   Everyone has their special spin on a dish that makes it kinda awesome, so what if we put those together, built a cookbook, and sold it on Amazon?  We could donate half the proceeds to Childs Play Cystic Fibrosis for one of our long-time forum members, using the other half for operating expenses for the site.   Beyond that, I think it'd be a fun little exercise and we'd all end up with a pretty sweet list of secret recipes.  If you guys are interested, I figured we'd just start throwing things out and then cull the list later.  I'll start.  I was also thinking we'd do it "Cooking for Geeks" style, assuming nothing and injecting some humor) What do you guys think?  


Snacks:

Krab, Lime, Awesome
Needed:
1/2 block of Philadelphia Creme Cheese
1/2 jar of (pick your salsa choice here)
1/2 a pound-ish of Imitation Krab Flakes
1 Bag of Tostitos "Hint of Lime" chips

Roughly an hour before your party guests arrive....
Unwrap the creme cheese.  Microwaving tinfoil wrapping makes the lights dance in your microwave and lets the smoke out.  It won't blow up though, Mythbusters showed us that. Using a microwave-safe plate, heat the 1/2 block of Creme Cheese for ~30 seconds (adjust for your microwave - you want it soft, not cooked).  Spread this over the plate evenly using the back side of a spoon (not your fingers!  that's just gross...unless you don't like your guests).  Spread a thin to medium amount of salsa over the top of the creme cheese.  Use the same spoon to spread it evenly (unless you've licked it clean already).  Hand-shred the 1/2 pound of Imitation Krab Flakes into a bowl.  Realizing you'll be eating them with chips as a delivery vehicle, size accordingly.  Take the shredded awesome results and sprinkle it liberally on top of the salsa / creme cheese.

You'll want to wash your hands for this next part.  Using your hand (the palm, weirdo) press the flakes down a bit and 'compact' the snack.  You want it to come off in one chunk, not fall all over the place.   Serve with Tostitos "Hint of Lime" chips as the flavor combo is awesome.   Some people aren't big salsa or creme cheese fans.  Those people eat this like it's their last meal.  Try it for yourself!  

« Last Edit: July 19, 2013, 04:52:14 PM by Knightshade Dragon » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2013, 04:04:00 PM »

great idea.  I'll add my wife's mango salsa and a recipe for seafood gumbo
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« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2013, 05:55:30 PM »

this is the single most requested recipe in our circle of friends.

The Greatest Dip Ever Made By Anyone

-3 locally grown tomatoes, Plum tomatoes are great in this. Chop em up and seed them.
-1 Avocado - we like Hass avocados, so if you use those use a couple as they are small. Chop those bad boys up as well.
-1 small sweet onion (Vidalia or Walla Walla), finely chopped.
-Some garlic, finely minced. We use 2 cloves, but you might like more.
-Some fresh cilantro. Some people hate this, so we leave it out when we are making for a group.
-Oil and vingegar. We use extra virgin olive oil and white wine vinegar at a 1-1 ratio. Usually a Tablespoon of each.
-1 package of feta, 4-6 ounces depending on your love of cheese.

Mix up everything except the oil and vinegar and the feta.

Whisk the oil/vinegar together and add slowly to the dip, gently folding it in.

Put that cheese in and gently mix some more.

Chill for awhile before serving to allow the flavors to mix.

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« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2013, 06:08:06 PM »

I make Mexican Pot Beans as the basis for a whole week's meals, especially toward the end of the month when the grocery budget is nearly gone -- you get a huge vat of beans for next to no money. I serve them as beans & rice the first night, then make burritos with them the second night, then loaded baked potatoes the third night, and then as a side dish with burgers the fourth night. Easy, tasty, cheap, nutritious.

Quote
To make a pot of robust Mexican beans, you need just a few everyday ingredients - dried pinto beans, chili powder, onions, garlic, and canned tomatoes. Use the quick-soak method of bringing the dried beans to a boil and letting them sit for an hour before draining and starting the regular cooking. Mexican natives enjoy these rich, creamy, spicy beans any time of day: as a side dish with eggs for breakfast; or for lunch or dinner wrapped in flour or corn tortillas and stuffed with grated cheese, chopped tomatoes, sliced green onions, shredded lettuce, and salsa. Beans contain the highest percentage of protein of any vegetable, so they're healthy and filling. New research says the low-fat, high-fiber content of beans protects against heart disease and controls weight. Mexican pot beans have it all: taste, wholesomeness, and low cost. Each cup - this pot makes 10 - is little more than "two bits" (25 cents).

   
2   pounds dried pinto beans
3   quarts water
2   onions, coarsely chopped
1   tablespoon chili powder
3   cloves garlic, finely chopped
1   can (about 14 ounces) whole plum or fire roasted tomatoes, crushed in a bowl
   Salt, to taste
1. In a large pot, bring the beans and 1 quart of the water to a boil. Simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and let the pot stand, covered, for 1 hour. Drain the beans into a colander and rinse with cold water.

2. In the pot combine the beans, the remaining 2 quarts of water, onions, chili powder, and garlic. Bring to a simmer, partially cover with the lid, and cook, stirring occasionally, for 45 minutes.

3. Stir in the tomatoes and salt (beans need at least 1 tablespoon for flavor). Continue cooking, uncovered, for 15 minutes or until the beans are very tender and the broth thickens.

Carnivores might like to add meat skins or back bacon.
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« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2013, 01:01:56 AM »

Cereal
 Ingredients..
1 Box of Cereal (any flavor)
1 Gallon of Milk
1 Large cooking pot

1) Get pot from cabinet.
2) Get box of cereal from cabinet
3) get Milk from cabinet
4) Throw Milk out and buy new gallon of milk from refrigerated section of Supermarket. (For best results, go to SuperMarket, not just a regular market)
5) Pour cereal into pot, then add milk. Bring to a boil
6) Throw out resulting mess
7) Goto IHOP
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« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2013, 01:03:39 AM »

Quote from: Punisher on July 20, 2013, 01:01:56 AM

Cereal
 Ingredients..
1 Box of Cereal (any flavor)
1 Gallon of Milk
1 Large cooking pot

1) Get pot from cabinet.
2) Get box of cereal from cabinet
3) get Milk from cabinet
4) Throw Milk out and buy new gallon of milk from refrigerated section of Supermarket. (For best results, go to SuperMarket, not just a regular market)
5) Pour cereal into pot, then add milk. Bring to a boil
6) Throw out resulting mess
7) Goto IHOP

lol!
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« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2013, 01:29:10 AM »

Quote from: Punisher on July 20, 2013, 01:01:56 AM

Cereal
 Ingredients..
1 Box of Cereal (any flavor)
1 Gallon of Milk
1 Large cooking pot

1) Get pot from cabinet.
2) Get box of cereal from cabinet
3) get Milk from cabinet
4) Throw Milk out and buy new gallon of milk from refrigerated section of Supermarket. (For best results, go to SuperMarket, not just a regular market)
5) Pour cereal into pot, then add milk. Bring to a boil
6) Throw out resulting mess
7) Goto BOB EVANS

Fixed that for you.
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« Reply #7 on: July 20, 2013, 01:31:46 AM »

Quote from: Tebunker on July 20, 2013, 01:29:10 AM

Quote from: Punisher on July 20, 2013, 01:01:56 AM

Cereal
 Ingredients..
1 Box of Cereal (any flavor)
1 Gallon of Milk
1 Large cooking pot

1) Get pot from cabinet.
2) Get box of cereal from cabinet
3) get Milk from cabinet
4) Throw Milk out and buy new gallon of milk from refrigerated section of Supermarket. (For best results, go to SuperMarket, not just a regular market)
5) Pour cereal into pot, then add milk. Bring to a boil
6) Throw out resulting mess
7) Goto BOB EVANS

Fixed that for you.
Bleh... it was fine the 1st time... IHOP is much better.... i would have also accepted Denny's as a valid answer... besides, it's my recipe!
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« Reply #8 on: July 20, 2013, 02:42:05 AM »

What is a Krab and how do you make flakes out of it?  Or imitation flakes?
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« Reply #9 on: July 20, 2013, 02:52:49 AM »

Quote from: Teggy on July 20, 2013, 02:42:05 AM

What is a Krab and how do you make flakes out of it?  Or imitation flakes?

Krab is imitation crab.  It's actually whitefish, usually Sol.  smile   It's damned yummy....
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« Reply #10 on: July 20, 2013, 03:01:02 AM »

Not my own original recipe, but this is a family favorite. One of the best and simplest recipes that I can recommend.
Gnocchi with Sausage and Spinach

Yield
Serves 4
Active Time
Hands-On Time: 15m
Total Time
Total Time: 25m
Ingredients

        2 9-ounce packages refrigerated gnocchi or one 17.5-ounce package shelf-stable gnocchi
        1 tablespoon olive oil
        1 medium yellow onion, finely chopped
        1 pound Italian sausage, casings removed
        1 clove garlic, finely chopped
        1 5-ounce bag baby spinach
        1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
        1/4 teaspoon black pepper
        3/4 cup (3 ounces) grated Parmesan, plus more for serving

Instructions

        Cook the gnocchi according to the package directions. Drain, reserving 1/4 cup of the cooking liquid.
        Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and cook until softened, about 5 minutes.
        Add the sausage and cook, crumbling it with a spoon, until browned, 5 to 7 minutes.
        Add the garlic, spinach, salt, and pepper and cook, tossing frequently, until the spinach wilts, about 3 minutes.
        Add the gnocchi, the reserved cooking liquid, and the Parmesan and toss. Divide among individual bowls and sprinkle with additional Parmesan.

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« Reply #11 on: July 20, 2013, 04:50:24 AM »

Quote from: Ironrod on July 19, 2013, 06:08:06 PM

I make Mexican Pot Beans as the basis for a whole week's meals, especially toward the end of the month when the grocery budget is nearly gone -- you get a huge vat of beans for next to no money. I serve them as beans & rice the first night, then make burritos with them the second night, then loaded baked potatoes the third night, and then as a side dish with burgers the fourth night. Easy, tasty, cheap, nutritious.

Quote
To make a pot of robust Mexican beans, you need just a few everyday ingredients - dried pinto beans, chili powder, onions, garlic, and canned tomatoes. Use the quick-soak method of bringing the dried beans to a boil and letting them sit for an hour before draining and starting the regular cooking. Mexican natives enjoy these rich, creamy, spicy beans any time of day: as a side dish with eggs for breakfast; or for lunch or dinner wrapped in flour or corn tortillas and stuffed with grated cheese, chopped tomatoes, sliced green onions, shredded lettuce, and salsa. Beans contain the highest percentage of protein of any vegetable, so they're healthy and filling. New research says the low-fat, high-fiber content of beans protects against heart disease and controls weight. Mexican pot beans have it all: taste, wholesomeness, and low cost. Each cup - this pot makes 10 - is little more than "two bits" (25 cents).
   
2   pounds dried pinto beans
3   quarts water
2   onions, coarsely chopped
1   tablespoon chili powder
3   cloves garlic, finely chopped
1   can (about 14 ounces) whole plum or fire roasted tomatoes, crushed in a bowl
   Salt, to taste
1. In a large pot, bring the beans and 1 quart of the water to a boil. Simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and let the pot stand, covered, for 1 hour. Drain the beans into a colander and rinse with cold water.

2. In the pot combine the beans, the remaining 2 quarts of water, onions, chili powder, and garlic. Bring to a simmer, partially cover with the lid, and cook, stirring occasionally, for 45 minutes.

3. Stir in the tomatoes and salt (beans need at least 1 tablespoon for flavor). Continue cooking, uncovered, for 15 minutes or until the beans are very tender and the broth thickens.

Carnivores might like to add meat skins or back bacon.

Made this a couple of times after you posted it years ago on OO. Pretty good, definitely easy and cheap. Black beans work well too.
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« Reply #12 on: July 20, 2013, 05:46:28 AM »

Quote from: Lee on July 20, 2013, 04:50:24 AM

Quote from: Ironrod on July 19, 2013, 06:08:06 PM

I make Mexican Pot Beans

Made this a couple of times after you posted it years ago on OO. Pretty good, definitely easy and cheap. Black beans work well too.

Thanks for the feedback. It's always nice to learn that I'm not just shouting into the void.

I've got a lot of good recipes but I don't know how tolerant people are of actually, you know, cooking.

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« Reply #13 on: July 20, 2013, 05:52:14 AM »

Quote from: Ironrod on July 20, 2013, 05:46:28 AM

Quote from: Lee on July 20, 2013, 04:50:24 AM

Quote from: Ironrod on July 19, 2013, 06:08:06 PM

I make Mexican Pot Beans

Made this a couple of times after you posted it years ago on OO. Pretty good, definitely easy and cheap. Black beans work well too.

Thanks for the feedback. It's always nice to learn that I'm not just shouting into the void.

I've got a lot of good recipes but I don't know how tolerant people are of actually, you know, cooking.

I think with enough good instructions we could put some awesome food together.  Hoping PeteRock comes in here and posts his patented chili that he makes for occasions....


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« Reply #14 on: July 26, 2013, 02:57:47 PM »

Ping!  I'm SURE you guys have some recipes to share....
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« Reply #15 on: July 26, 2013, 09:55:34 PM »

OK, here's one that I make several times during the fall, when my garden's kicking out the produce. I use homegrown tomatoes, eggplant, zucchini, green beans, peppers, and herbs (sage, thyme, and oregano); the rest is store-bought.

Italian Vegetable Stew
Makes 6 generous servings

1/3    cup olive oil
2    medium onions, chopped
2    stalks celery, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced
3    carrots, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced
2    cloves garlic, chopped
2    medium eggplant, cut into 1-inch cubes
1/2    cup water
1    can (28 ounces) whole tomatoes, drained and chopped (reserve juice)
2    red bell peppers, cored, seeded, and cut into 3/4-inch pieces
   Salt and black pepper, to taste
3/4    pound green beans, trimmed and cut into 2-inch pieces
1 1/4    pounds zucchini, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced
2    medium boiling potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces

1. In a large flameproof casserole over medium-high heat, heat the oil. When it is hot, add the onions, celery, carrots, and garlic. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes or until the vegetables are pale golden.

2. Add the eggplant and water. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes or until the eggplant softens.

3. Stir in the tomatoes and their juices with the bell peppers, salt, and black pepper. Lower the heat and cook, uncovered, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes.

4. Meanwhile, in a saucepan of boiling salted water, cook the green beans for 5 minutes or until tender but still crisp. With a slotted spoon, transfer to a bowl.

5. Add the zucchini to the green bean water. Cook for 5 minutes or until tender but still crisp. Transfer to the bowl of green beans.

6. Add the potatoes to the vegetable water. Cook for 10 minutes or until they are just tender.

7. Add the beans, zucchini, and potatoes to the eggplant mixture. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes or until all the vegetables are soft. (Total cooking time is 70 minutes.) Taste for seasoning and add more salt and pepper, if you like.

As mentioned above, I add homegrown sage, thyme, and oregano at step 3. A bay leaf never hurts, either. Serve it with garlic toast and red wine.
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« Reply #16 on: July 27, 2013, 03:03:51 AM »

Chicken fried steak;

Seriously.

Get some thin cut Eye of Round steaks.
Beat the ever loving crap out of them with a meat tenderizer. I mean beat the steaks as if they insulted you, your family and your dead relatives and then spit on your kids. Very important step since Eye of Round is tough, but good for this.

Then, Soak the Eye of round in buttermilk seasoned with salt and pepper, don't need too much, do it to taste.
Let that sit as long as you can tolerate, sometimes overnight is best.

Then in a big frying pan heat up about 1/4 to 1/2 cup of oil. Vegetable oil is fine, peanut is better, but don't use Olive oil it smokes at a lower temp. I have no exact temp, I can just tell by the shimmer of the oil in the pan, I heat up at just above medium on my stove top.

while the oil heats up, take about a 1/2 cup to cup of flour and about a 1/4 cup of corn starch(this is the key to crispy and flaky), mix it with a seasoning of choice, I like to use traditional montreal steak seasoning, but you can get creative. Season to taste here. Put this is a bowl big enough to dip the steaks in.

In another bowl, your choice here, but either more buttermilk or or regular milk or a couple of eggs beaten, but not as violently as the steaks.

Set these bowls by the heated pan.

So in order with each steak, go Flour, Egg/Milk , Flour, Fryer. In that order. When putting the steaks in the frying pan lay them away from you.

Cook a couple at a time, roughly 3 to 4 minutes on each size depending on thickness, desired wellness and if the batter is browning. I personally have the steaks around 3/4 of an ich to an inch thick, cook close to 4 minutes on each side and end up with medium. May go less to try for medium rare.

Let steaks rest a minute or two before serving.

If you want to make a white gravy for it, this recipe doesn't need it, but you can easily melt a couple of tablespoons of butter and slowly add a tablespoon or four of flour and some milk, season with salt and pepper to taste. Do this over low to medium heat being careful not to burn the butter. DO NOT USE MARGARINE or Butter substitute for your gravy, it will not satisfy. I personally skip said gravy.

I know that isn't an exact recipe, but that is part of the fun, try different things, you get the general gist, and make a really good southern comfort food.
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« Reply #17 on: July 27, 2013, 03:36:11 PM »

I have three recipes but will have to get to them later.

Ken's Yummy Spaghetti

Ingredients
1 pound of ground beef, you can do lean, but it's really good at 80/20
spaghetti noodles (I usually get a handful or two and break in half)
Italian Seasoning (I don't measure, I just add to touch)
Garlic Salt (I don't measure, I just add to touch)
Black Pepper (I like the fine black pepper, and I don't measure, I just add to touch)
12oz of Tomato Paste (at least 12 oz)
10-12oz of water (do 6 oz at a time, just to make sure it doesn't get really runny.)
and my special ingredient
Mustard (I don't measure, I just do it by touch.  I would estimate it to be 2-3 teaspoons)


Put meat in a deep pan, brown the beef.  Choose to drain the grease or not.  If there isn't much grease I leave it in.  Depends on the type of meat you are using.  While it's browning I sprinkle in some garlic salt, pepper, and Italian seasoning. 

In a pot, fill with water, bring to boil and then add noodles.  Stir occasionally.  Some people add salt or oil to keep it from sticking.  I never really had any problems as long as I stirred often.

When the ground beef is done, I add in the tomato paste, and water.  I stir until the sauce is fairly thick.  Remember to add the water in stages to make sure you don't make the sauce runny.  It needs to be thick.  I add more garlic salt, Italian seasoning and pepper.  Then I add the mustard.  You think it may be gross, but it interacts well with the acidity of the tomato paste.  People beg to me to make my spaghetti, it's that good.  It's better than Prego and Ragu, that's for sure.

Stir everything together, cover the pan, bring to a low boil, and then set it on low.  Stir every once in a while so that the meat doesn't stick to the bottom of the pan.

Drain the noodles.  Serve sauce over noodles.

It's my favorite dish.

I'll post my Rib recipe and Chicken Enchiladas recipes soon, they are the bomb.   
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« Reply #18 on: August 27, 2013, 05:21:04 PM »

I'm surprised at the lack of steak recipes.  You guys don't have any special secret steaky bits cooking methods?
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« Reply #19 on: August 27, 2013, 05:30:27 PM »

Quote from: Knightshade Dragon on August 27, 2013, 05:21:04 PM

I'm surprised at the lack of steak recipes.  You guys don't have any special secret steaky bits cooking methods?

Olive Oil.  Salt.  Pepper.  Get grill hot as possible.  Sear steak on each side (typically 90 secs - 2 mins).  Lower grill to ~400 degrees.  Cook to 120 degrees max.  Pull from grill.  Rest.  Eat.
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« Reply #20 on: August 27, 2013, 05:34:45 PM »

Quote from: Knightshade Dragon on August 27, 2013, 05:21:04 PM

I'm surprised at the lack of steak recipes.  You guys don't have any special secret steaky bits cooking methods?

my recipe for steak.  
1) get the grill red hot
2) sear both sides of the steak for 60 seconds
3) enjoy!

Yeah I like my steak to moo when I cut it.    I will add this,  marinating a steak overnight in Italian dressing gives you a very tender flavorful steak, this also works quite well with chicken breast.
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« Reply #21 on: August 27, 2013, 06:59:55 PM »

1) cut steak off cow.
2) pass each side over candle a few times.
3) open bottle of beer.  good beer.  domestic if necessary.
4) enjoy!
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« Reply #22 on: August 27, 2013, 07:14:31 PM »

Lately I've been enjoying teriyaki steak tips as a good way to jazz up some cheap cuts of meat. Marinate steak tips in some good teriyaki sauce for a couple of hours and grill them about 3 minutes per side. I scored some delicious kosher teriyaki sauce with sesame seeds and no HFCS.

Yesterday I made a big vat of the Italian Vegetable Stew that I posted earlier. Took over 3 hours including skinning and coring the tomatoes, but I'll get 2 dinners and 2 lunches out of it and I was able to use up 10 pounds of homegrown tomatoes, three eggplants, two big zukes, and all of my green beans and bell peppers. Oh, and I threw in a Biker Billy jalapeno for just a little burn. Definitely worth the effort if you have homegrown produce.
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« Reply #23 on: August 27, 2013, 07:37:35 PM »

I have a different thing I guess.  I take the steak out and let it hit room temperature.  I then heat my grill to ~600 to 700 (infrared grill ftw), rub CostCo Garlic Salt liberally on both sides.  Toss it on the grill for 4 minutes, turn it a bit and heat for 2 minutes, flip for 2 minutes, rest for a few while I finish the sides.   It comes out medium rare and tastes pretty great. 
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« Reply #24 on: August 27, 2013, 07:57:40 PM »

Quote from: CeeKay on August 27, 2013, 06:59:55 PM

1) cut steak off cow.
2) pass each side over candle a few times.
3) open bottle of beer.  good beer.  domestic if necessary.
4) enjoy!

This is pretty close to how I order a rare steak at a restaurant as they tend to overcook them.  When they ask how rare I want it I basically tell them to walk it slowly through a warm room.
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« Reply #25 on: November 08, 2013, 03:09:22 AM »

I made New Orleans Voodoo Shrimp last night. It's an ambitious recipe that's really, really worth the effort (and expense; including the beer I think I spent nearly $40 on this one).

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NEW ORLEANS VOODOO SHRIMP

Serves 6 (4 is more realistic)

You can use toast points or rice in place of the corn bread. (But don't.)

2 pounds large or extra-large shrimp, shelled and deveined
1 tablespoon lemon juice
2 teaspoons hot pepper sauce
1 12-ounce bottle dark beer, preferably black lager (stout or porter would work, too)
1½ cups heavy cream
1/3 cup Worcestershire sauce
1½ teaspoons lobster base (preferably Better Than Bouillon brand) or 1 cube shrimp bouillon
1½ teaspoons chopped fresh thyme
1½ teaspoons dried oregano, crushed
¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 packed tablespoon brown sugar
Salt and black pepper
1 14.5-ounce can petite diced tomatoes, drained
3 tablespoons chopped fresh basil
6 scallions, thinly sliced (about 2/3 cup)
6 wedges corn bread, halved and toasted, if desired, for serving

Make cornbread according to package directions.

In a medium bowl, toss the shrimp, lemon juice, and hot pepper sauce; cover and refrigerate until ready to use.

In a large straight-sided saute pan over medium-high heat, stir the beer, cream, Worcestershire sauce, lobster base or bouillon, thyme, oregano, cayenne, brown sugar, and ½ teaspoon each salt and black pepper to combine. Bring to a strong simmer and continue to simmer vigorously, stirring and scraping the bottom of the pan occasionally, until reduced to about 1¼ cups and very thick (about the consistency of warm honey) and glossy, about 16 minutes. Add the shrimp and tomatoes, stir to mix, return to a simmer, adjust heat to medium, and cook until shrimp are just cooked through, 3 to 5½ minutes. Stir in the basil and about half the scallions. Taste the sauce and adjust seasoning with salt and black pepper, if necessary.

While the shrimp are cooking, divide the cornbread into quarters, then slice each piece in half. Toast the bottom halves under the broiler. Place the bottom halves in warmed shallow bowls, top with some of the shrimp mixture, set the top halves slightly askew over the shrimp, spoon on a little more sauce, sprinkle with the remaining scallions, and serve at once.

I served it into 4 bowls. We ate two of them right away and refrigerated the other two for dinner the next day. The reheated servings still tasted great but the cornbread was soggy and the shrimp were chewy. Still, it's a hard recipe to cut in half so I'll probably do it the same way next time.

It took me a long time to reduce the sauce to gravy, possibly because I don't have a saute pan and used a skillet instead. Had to go to 3 grocers before I found the lobster base.
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rshetts2
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« Reply #26 on: November 08, 2013, 03:48:23 AM »

Thanks for the Voodoo shrimp recipe, it sounds awesome.  Ill have to give it a try.
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« Reply #27 on: November 08, 2013, 06:58:02 AM »

It is really delicious. Let me know if you have any tips after you make it yourself. It's fussy enough to take me another 2-3 times to perfect it.
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« Reply #28 on: November 11, 2013, 10:18:00 PM »

Yeah I'm gonna give that one a go for tailgating I think.
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« Reply #29 on: November 12, 2013, 07:17:33 AM »

Anyone have a good simple chili recipe? With or without beans.
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« Reply #30 on: November 12, 2013, 06:26:59 PM »

Yep.

1lb Lean Ground Beef
1 - 2 Tbsp Canola Oil
2 Strips Bacon (optional)
1 White Onion
1 Red Bell Pepper
4 Garlic Cloves
2 Tbsp Good Chili Powder (like Penzey's!)
1 Tbsp Cumin
1 tsp ground coriander
1 tsp salt
1 tsp Mexican Oregano
1/4 tsp ground black pepper
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
1/4 tsp red pepper flakes (or you know, to taste... you can omit both of these, which I do for my sissy kid)
1 15oz can black beans, rinsed
1 15oz can diced tomatoes (get Hunt's)
1 15oz can tomato sauce
1 cup frozen corn

If using bacon, chop it up and cook it in the bottom of a big soup pot until crispy, then remove and put on a towel.  Remove most of the bacon grease, but leave a little, you know, for flavor.
Add half of oil to pot and swirl to coat.  Cook ground beef over medium high heat until browned and crumbled.  Remove from pan.
Add other half of oil, and add in chopped onion and bell pepper, and cook until tender.
While this is going on, put all of the spices (sans garlic) into a little container and mix together.
Add minced garlic.  Cook until fragrant... like 30 seconds.
Dump in spices, and stir to coat everything and get fragrant.  30 - 60 seconds.
Dump in beans, diced tomatoes, tomato sauce and corn.  Bring to a simmer... throw in crock pot for a few hours.
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« Reply #31 on: November 12, 2013, 06:41:06 PM »

I kind of made up a recipe for a half assed chicken pozole the other night that was pretty good and might fix your chili craving as well.  I used a 'natural' rotisserie chicken from the grocery store and it was the way to go... didn't have to roast a chicken, and it had all the benefits of having done so.

Meat from 1 rotisserie chicken, removed from carcass and shredded into bite sizes.
8 cups low sodium chicken stock (I used Pacific Foods, which is really good... so this was two cartons).
1lb tomatillos (or if you can find canned tomatillos, you could use those instead and save a step).
1 Tbsp Canola or similar oil
1 White Onion, chopped
1 Red Bell Pepper, chopped
1 Large Stalk Celery, chopped
5 Cloves Garlic, minced
1 Tbsp Ground Cumin
1 tsp Ground Coriander
1 tsp Mexican Oregano
1/2 tsp salt (then add to taste)
1/4 tsp ground black pepper
1 roasted medium hot pepper - pasilla or anahiem, or just buy a small can of roasted diced green chiles.
2 Tbsp flour
1 28oz can whole hominy (BRING ON THE HOMINY!), drained and rinsed.
Cayenne pepper, to taste

Heat the broiler to high.  Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil, and remove husks and wash the tomatillos.  Arrange on the baking sheet.  You could probably roast your hot pepper on the same sheet and it'd work out ok.  Stick under the broiler and turn regularly until mushy and charred (or not mushy, but charred for the pepper).  Remove seeds and skin from blackened pepper, and dice.  Maybe 20 minutes of oven time.
Add the oil to a medium hot stock pot, and throw in onion, bell pepper and celery.  Cook until tender (8 min?)
While that's going on, remove the stems/hard bits from the tomatillos, and blend in the blender until smooth.
Add garlic to stock pot, stir 30 seconds. 
Add in spices, stir 30 seconds.
Add in broth, chicken, tomatillo puree, diced hot pepper, and hominy.  Bring to a low boil.
Mix flour and 1 cup of water together separately, and whisk until smooth.  Add into pot to thicken.
Adjust seasonings to taste.
Let it cook for an hour or so.

Thoughts: if you made a roux from the flour it might be slightly tastier, but... that's more work.
If you added the hominy later (last 15 minutes or something) then it'd be a bit firmer, but if it's in there a long time it adds a nice corny flavor to everything, and helps thicken the soup a bit, I think.
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« Reply #32 on: November 12, 2013, 07:08:19 PM »

anyone else here like using sausage in their chili instead of ground beef?  I started using Bob Evans Zesty Hot sausage and I don't think I could ever go back to regular beef chili again.  on the plus side it is not too hot, you can still spice up the chili with fresh jalapenos without it getting too spicy.
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« Reply #33 on: November 12, 2013, 07:22:49 PM »

I feel like it overpowers a lot of the time, and usually really ups the greasiness.
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« Reply #34 on: November 12, 2013, 08:58:40 PM »

D&B Kung-Pao Tofu

Please double the amounts for leftovers!

1 14-ounce package extra-firm water-packed tofu, rinsed
2 Tbsp. sesame oil
1 Tbsp. lime juice (optional)
1 oz. hot chili paste
1 tsp. rice wine vinegar
1/2 tsp. “five-spice powder”
2 tsp. brown sugar
3 Tbsp. oyster-flavored sauce or 2 Tbsp. soy sauce
1/2 tsp. cornstarch or flour dissolved in 2 Tbsp. water
12 oz. broccolette crowns, trimmed and cut into bite-size pieces (4 cups?)
3 small bok-choy
1 red bell pepper, cut into 1/2-inch diced parts
1 onion
2 carrots
1 small minced fresh ginger
2 cloves minced garlic
6 Tbsp. unsalted roasted cashews (or peanuts)

Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees. Grease a baking sheet (or cover with foil) and bake tofu for 20 minutes, turning once. When done, stir-fry tofu and cashews/peanuts in wok with sesame oil.

In a small bowl, combine the lime juice, chili paste, vinegar, spice, sugar, oyster/soy sauce and cornstarch and stir until well combined. Put the baked and stir-fried tofu in there and allow to marinate for _at least_ 30 minutes (preferably several hours to overnight), mixing occasionally to coat tofu well. Set aside.

In a wok, large skillet or sauté pan over medium-high heat, add the sesame oil, then sauté the bok choy stem, carrot and brocollette for 5 minutes, then add the rest of the vegetables and stir-fry for 3 more minutes.

Add the sauce and stir until coated.

Add the tofu and continue to cook until all pieces are well coated (cooking just until combined and heated through).

Serve with rice or noodles.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2013, 09:00:46 PM by hitbyambulance » Logged
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« Reply #35 on: November 16, 2013, 10:31:42 PM »

Quote from: kratz on November 12, 2013, 07:22:49 PM

I feel like it overpowers a lot of the time, and usually really ups the greasiness.

I usually just dump in the sausage complete with what grease there is in the pan, but Bob Evans sausage usually doesn't have that much grease left over.  I was kind of surprised about that the first time I fried up some.
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