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Author Topic: Somethin' for the old-timers here  (Read 1530 times)
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Zekester
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« on: January 21, 2011, 07:43:21 PM »

Not much goin on today, so i just thought i'd throw this up........

To all the kids who survived the 1930's, 40's, 50's, 60's and 70's!

First, we survived being born to mothers who smoked and/or drank while they were pregnant. They took aspirin, ate blue cheese dressing, tuna from a can, and didn't get tested for diabetes.

Then after that trauma, we were put to sleep on our tummies in baby cribs covered with bright colored lead-based paints. We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets. There weren't any plugs in the electric outlets and some of us learned not to stick scissors blades into them.

As infants & children, we would ride in cars with no crumple zones to absorb accident damage, no car seats, booster seats, seat belts or air bags. Riding in the back of a pick up truck on a warm day was always a special treat. When we rode our bikes, we had no helmets to protect our heads. We undertook some risks when we hitchhiked or rode the Pawley family bus system (later the county bus system) in Dade County.

We drank water from the garden hose and NOT from a bottle. This was particularly risky in west Hialeah if you drank from the well water hose because most of us were on septic tanks instead of the sewer system and probably most of western Dade County was that way back in the 50's and 60's.

We fished along canals and lakes chock full of water moccasins on land frequented by rattlesnakes. Sometimes we swam or were pushed into the same canals and we survived.

We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle and none of us actually died from this. {removed cause kratz was crying}

We ate cupcakes, white bread and real butter, drank McArthur's or Velda Farms' whole milk chock full of fat, ate ice cream full of fat, ate too many Royal Castle hamburgers and too much pizza, and drank Kool-Aid made with sugar, but we weren't overweight because we were always outside playing!

We would leave home in the morning and play all day, swimming in dangerous newly dug rockpits occasionally, as long as we were back home by the time the streetlights came on. Some parents would yell or whistle loudly when it was time to come home. Other than that, no one was able to reach us all day long. And we were just fine.

We would spend hours building our go-carts out of scraps only to find out we forgot the brakes. After running into the bushes a few times, we learned to solve the problem.

We did not have Playstations, Nintendo's, X-boxes, no video games at all, no 150 channels on cable or satellite TV, no video movies or DVD's, no surround-sound or CD's, no cell phones, no personal computers, no Internet or chat rooms! A lot of us didn't have air-conditioning in our homes until the 70's, but it seemed like we had ocean breezes to cool us off somehow.

We had FRIENDS and we went outside and found them! We fell out of trees, got cut, broke bones and teeth and there were no lawsuits from these accidents. Some of us ate worms and mud pies made from dirt, and the worms did not live in us forever.

We were given BB guns for our 10th thru 14th birthdays, made up games with sticks and tennis balls and, although we were told it would happen, we did not put out very many eyes.

We rode bikes or walked to friends' homes and knocked on the door or rang the bell, or just walked in and talked to them!

Little League had tryouts, often at parks miles away that we had to ride bikes to, and not everyone made the team. Those who didn't had to learn to deal with disappointment. Imagine that!

The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke the law was unheard of. They actually sided with the law and the police officers who nailed us!

These generations have produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers and inventors ever!

The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas. But we had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned how to deal with it all!

If YOU are one of them . . . CONGRATULATIONS! You might want to share this with others who have had the luck to grow up as kids, before the lawyers and the government regulated so much of our lives for our own good. And while you are at it, forward it to your kids so they will know how brave (and lucky) their parents were.

The above kind of makes you want to run through the house with scissors, doesn't it?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The quote of the year is by Jay Leno:

"With hurricanes, tornados, fires out of control, mud slides, flooding, severe thunderstorms tearing up the country from one end to another, and with the threat of bird flu and terrorist attacks, "Are we sure this is a good time to take God out of the Pledge of Allegiance?"


.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2011, 04:56:37 PM by Zekester » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2011, 08:00:52 PM »

Truly great days.
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« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2011, 08:02:37 PM »

nice one Zeke!
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« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2011, 08:08:37 PM »

it could be argued that the smoking and drinking while pregnant and the lead paint could explain some interesting posts around here...  ninja
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Zekester
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« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2011, 08:09:02 PM »

Ya I guess I should say that I have no idea who wrote it, but it sure does pertain a lot to my childhood.

I've often wondered how our teenage years would have been had we had cell phones to communicate with eachother all the time. Usually we found out on Monday at school if there were any parties we missed, or if anyone got into a fight, or someone got laid. LOL
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Zekester
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« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2011, 08:09:23 PM »

Quote from: Harkonis on January 21, 2011, 08:08:37 PM

it could be argued that the smoking and drinking while pregnant and the lead paint could explain some interesting posts around here...  ninja

Haha...ya, maybe
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Zekester
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« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2011, 08:34:14 PM »

Hmmm, what else do I remember from back then......

(let me know if this needs a nsfw label)

Girls? ya, oral was pretty damn rare unlike today. AIDS really wasn't around that we knew of back then, so we had plenty of unprotected sex. And most girls I knew were unshaven. there was no girl-on-girl like today, but if it did go on it was extremely secretive.

I was pulled over at least three times after drinking and driving when I was 16-17, and never got in trouble for DUI. Usually either got a ticket for whatever traffic infraction it was, or got just a warning.

Reefer was pretty popular, and fairly cheap. I guess that's still true? But we also had valuum, quaalude, and acid. I didnt dabble much in that shit though.

Jeans were super-tight on girls and guys. Jordache jeans were the big thing. I actually liked mine...they fit well and were pretty rugged. I'm happy to see tight jeans are back on girls now. LOVE IT.

I lived a few blocks from the river, so we spent a lot of time down there swimming and fishing in the summers. There was also a nice private patch of woods that we called "the swing" because, duh, there was a nice bullrope there. We'd go to hang out all day, pretending to smoke and look at Playboy's.

Some of us had people in the family that knew how to weld, so we had homemade choppers for bicycles. All it was was longer forks welded together. The things wouldn't handle for shit, but they were cool to cruise around. And definitely NO helmets. lol

There was an abandoned "workhouse" near us, and we would sneak in there and mill around in the different buildings. Most were half falling down. And when they finally tore the place down, I would sit there for hours watching the crane with a ball smash the shit out of the buildings. Loved that.

Puppies were easy to find. They were everywhere. We had plenty. We almost never got them shots or took them to the vet, and they lived fine. It was pretty easy to get exactly the type of mix you wanted.

When we got cars, they were cheap and easy to work on. They didnt have all of them emissions and computer stuff like today. Gas, spark and timing were the main things to check for when something was wrong. We didnt need insurance. muscle cars from the 70's were easy to find, and cheap to buy. I had a '73 GTO, '74 Roadrunner, '70 Mustang, and '71 Camaro. I also had that big-ass white Cadillac that was just on the new American Top Gear episode. The exact car.

I also got my first motorcycle when I was 16. Drag-raced that bitch, along with a half a dozen others over the next couple years. Japanese bikes were so durable that you could drag race them all night, and ride the sucker home 50 miles away at 2am. They were bulletproof. But we did have to wear helmets back then  mad I ran from the police quite a few times with my bikes.

There's more, but i'll stop now  icon_razz
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« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2011, 09:26:47 PM »

Quote from: Zekester on January 21, 2011, 07:43:21 PM

The quote of the year is by Jay Leno:

"With hurricanes, tornados, fires out of control, mud slides, flooding, severe thunderstorms tearing up the country from one end to another, and with the threat of bird flu and terrorist attacks, "Are we sure this is a good time to take God out of the Pledge of Allegiance?"

I'll contest that as the "quote of the year".

Hey Jay, do you really think your government, or ANY of them, are acting in the best interests of God? The thing about allegiance is that it's a two-way street. Tongue
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« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2011, 09:43:51 PM »

Purge...chillout...... icon_biggrin




As a 1974 HS graduate we led lifestyles that most parents wouldn't consider allowing now. It is strange how the kids of that time grew up to be the paranoid parents of today.

One of the strangest things to me is how state drivers license laws (at least in California) have changed the way things are done. My friends and I all had our licenses the minute we turned 16 and basically we all had cars within a few months of HS graduation. My daughters have friends who are out of high school and still don't drive. Because state law doesn't allow for sharing a ride until you have been driving for at least a year kids just don't get licenses. Parents take kids everywhere.
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« Reply #9 on: January 21, 2011, 10:00:04 PM »

I grew up in the late 70s/early 80s and most of the stuff in Zekester's post was true in the small Montana town where we lived.   But I think a lot of the changes are due to a perception we have that the world isn't as safe and the reality that it's a lot more legalistic then it used to be.  We fear our neighbors because we all hear the horror stories, but our actual crime rates are lower.  But it doesn't seem that way because anything bad that happens around the country we hear about right away.  And kids wear helmets and can't buy BB guns because too many people sued when bad things happened.

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« Reply #10 on: January 21, 2011, 10:53:28 PM »

Quote from: Zekester on January 21, 2011, 07:43:21 PM

We did have a crude saying for those friends who used too much lip over the bottle opening though.

Dude, you are so right on. These are the true problems with this pussified version of America we all have to put up with now... our expectant mothers aren't smoking and nobody's cool with you saying 'nigger lip'.  Those were truly better times.
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« Reply #11 on: January 21, 2011, 11:29:13 PM »

I actually did  run through the house with scissors...I have a 2.5" scar on my knee to prove it.  Why is it still so visible after25+ years?  Well because I was on my bike a week later ripping the stiches out popping wheelies.
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« Reply #12 on: January 22, 2011, 01:12:19 AM »

Quote from: Scuzz on January 21, 2011, 09:43:51 PM

Purge...chillout...... icon_biggrin

As a 1974 HS graduate we led lifestyles that most parents wouldn't consider allowing now. It is strange how the kids of that time grew up to be the paranoid parents of today.



Indeed. The people across the street from us dress their toddlers in helmets and knee pads to play in the yard. They usually sit outside and watch them. At least the kids actually play outdoors a lot...you don't see much of that anymore. I haven't seen any sign of them playing in the snow, though, and we've had a lot this year. Their yard looks as untrampled as mine does.

Snow forts and tunneling...good times.

(I was Class of 75, btw. Didn't know that we're the same age).
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« Reply #13 on: January 22, 2011, 01:18:09 AM »

Quote from: kratz on January 21, 2011, 10:53:28 PM

Quote from: Zekester on January 21, 2011, 07:43:21 PM

We did have a crude saying for those friends who used too much lip over the bottle opening though.

Dude, you are so right on. These are the true problems with this pussified version of America we all have to put up with now... our expectant mothers aren't smoking and nobody's cool with you saying 'nigger lip'.  Those were truly better times.

What?  You mean kids back in the 70's used racial slurs as slang??? Say it isn't so!  Gasp, we even used it in the 80's!  When will the kids learn?

Way to miss the point.
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« Reply #14 on: January 22, 2011, 01:20:34 AM »

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« Reply #15 on: January 22, 2011, 01:32:03 AM »

Lets hear it for the class of '74!   That posting was a summation of my growing up.  The sheer level of paranoia in todays society is mind boggling to me.  People complain about jackhammer noise and feed their kids McDonalds 5 times a week.  Maybe what we experienced as kids has caused this whole paranoia thing?  Well its either that or way too much reefer! icon_smile
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« Reply #16 on: January 22, 2011, 02:04:27 AM »

Quote from: Mr. Fed on January 22, 2011, 01:20:34 AM



LOL at Southwest Virginia.
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« Reply #17 on: January 22, 2011, 05:01:31 AM »

Quote from: morlac on January 22, 2011, 01:18:09 AM

Quote from: kratz on January 21, 2011, 10:53:28 PM

Quote from: Zekester on January 21, 2011, 07:43:21 PM

We did have a crude saying for those friends who used too much lip over the bottle opening though.

Dude, you are so right on. These are the true problems with this pussified version of America we all have to put up with now... our expectant mothers aren't smoking and nobody's cool with you saying 'nigger lip'.  Those were truly better times.

What?  You mean kids back in the 70's used racial slurs as slang??? Say it isn't so!  Gasp, we even used it in the 80's!  When will the kids learn?

Way to miss the point.

 thumbsup
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« Reply #18 on: January 22, 2011, 06:47:17 AM »

Quote from: morlac on January 22, 2011, 01:18:09 AM

Quote from: kratz on January 21, 2011, 10:53:28 PM

Quote from: Zekester on January 21, 2011, 07:43:21 PM

We did have a crude saying for those friends who used too much lip over the bottle opening though.

Dude, you are so right on. These are the true problems with this pussified version of America we all have to put up with now... our expectant mothers aren't smoking and nobody's cool with you saying 'nigger lip'.  Those were truly better times.

What?  You mean kids back in the 70's used racial slurs as slang??? Say it isn't so!  Gasp, we even used it in the 80's!  When will the kids learn?

Way to miss the point.

Yes, when...

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Zekester
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« Reply #19 on: January 22, 2011, 02:23:27 PM »

Kratz, I think you need to go rub one out.

There was nothing in this thread that was supposed to be inflammatory.
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« Reply #20 on: January 22, 2011, 02:44:09 PM »

Quote from: Zekester on January 21, 2011, 07:43:21 PM

Not much goin on today, so i just thought i'd throw this up........

To all the kids who survived the 1930's, 40's, 50's, 60's and 70's

We did not have Playstations, Nintendo's, X-boxes, no video games at all, no 150 channels on cable or satellite TV, no video movies or DVD's, no surround-sound or CD's, no cell phones, no personal computers, no Internet or chat rooms! A lot of us didn't have air-conditioning in our homes until the 70's, but


I don't know about you guys,  ut I had Odyssee, HBO if I played with the fine tuning, Super 8 versions of movies (including some pr0n), cassets, 8-track, and a transistor radio. I remember the "Buckle up for safety"ads along with the anti-smoking ones.  maybe the 70's part should be dropped.  smile

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« Reply #21 on: January 22, 2011, 04:37:51 PM »

Quote from: Zekester on January 22, 2011, 02:23:27 PM

Kratz, I think you need to go rub one out.

There was nothing in this thread that was supposed to be inflammatory.

Of course not.
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« Reply #22 on: January 22, 2011, 04:55:53 PM »

Quote from: kratz on January 22, 2011, 04:37:51 PM

Quote from: Zekester on January 22, 2011, 02:23:27 PM

Kratz, I think you need to go rub one out.

There was nothing in this thread that was supposed to be inflammatory.

Of course not.

I removed that part from the original post just for you, kratz. Didn't mean to hurt your feelings.

 crybaby
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« Reply #23 on: January 22, 2011, 05:00:33 PM »

Quote from: sgoldj on January 22, 2011, 02:44:09 PM

Quote from: Zekester on January 21, 2011, 07:43:21 PM

Not much goin on today, so i just thought i'd throw this up........

To all the kids who survived the 1930's, 40's, 50's, 60's and 70's

We did not have Playstations, Nintendo's, X-boxes, no video games at all, no 150 channels on cable or satellite TV, no video movies or DVD's, no surround-sound or CD's, no cell phones, no personal computers, no Internet or chat rooms! A lot of us didn't have air-conditioning in our homes until the 70's, but


I don't know about you guys,  ut I had Odyssee, HBO if I played with the fine tuning, Super 8 versions of movies (including some pr0n), cassets, 8-track, and a transistor radio. I remember the "Buckle up for safety"ads along with the anti-smoking ones.  maybe the 70's part should be dropped.  smile



I barely remember the Odyssey, also got HBO that way, have two Super 8 movies but not pr0n, never got into 8-tracks, and used to walk up and down main street carrying a boombox blasting "you dropped a bomb on me" 

LOL
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« Reply #24 on: January 22, 2011, 06:24:57 PM »

Quote from: Zekester on January 22, 2011, 04:55:53 PM

Quote from: kratz on January 22, 2011, 04:37:51 PM

Quote from: Zekester on January 22, 2011, 02:23:27 PM

Kratz, I think you need to go rub one out.

There was nothing in this thread that was supposed to be inflammatory.

Of course not.

I removed that part from the original post just for you, kratz. Didn't mean to hurt your feelings.

 crybaby

You flatter yourself if you think you are capable of hurting my feelings.

I would think you would want to remove it because nostalgia for the casual racism of your childhood is idiotic...

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« Reply #25 on: January 22, 2011, 06:50:33 PM »

This is excerpted from a column in yesterday's Boston Globe. No link because access is limited to subscribers, of which I is one. No guilt because I is one and because I am not quoting the entire column. It made me think of this thread.

Quote
Where are the snow shovelers of yesteryear?

When I was a kid in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, a snowstorm was a great entrepreneurial opportunity. As soon as the flakes tailed off, you grabbed your shovel and headed out. You'd ring a doorbell, hope for an older person, and offer to clear the walk for a couple of bucks. The driveway might earn you another five or so.

In a good afternoon of shoveling, you could pocket more than a paperboy made in a month. It was one reason I loved winter. (The other was hooky-bobbing, a should-be Olympic sport where you crept up behind when a car stopped at the corner, grabbed the bumper, and vied for the longest shoe-sled ride along the snowy streets.)

Many decades later, I've arrived at the age where paying someone to shovel seems like a justifiable investment in preventive health care. So where are the earnest young guys eager to make a buck? As far as I can tell, they are all on Facebook or busy texting their pals.

Shovel snow? RUS? G1. LOLOLOLOL. ROFL!

Indeed, during my nearly three decades in Boston, exactly one kid has come by seeking a shoveling job. He worked for about 20 minutes on freeing my car from the snowplowed ridge that held it captive, whittling the wintry berm down to the point where you might possibly have extracted the vehicle if, say, you had a mammoth fork-lift at your disposal. When I noted same, he said he'd settle for half the agreed-on fee - and left me to finish the job.

If you're, um, lucky enough to have some Gen Y-ers in your neighborhood, you can find yourself wondering if they are even aware of what that exotic cold-weather implement with the wooden shaft and wide metal blade is for, let alone know how to use one themselves.

A couple years back, when frigid weather transformed the untended sidewalk next door into a slip-and-fall no man's land, I asked the guys renting there if they'd like to borrow my shovel. Or even my prized ice-piercing spade.

No thanks, one shrugged. We can make it through OK.

As the winter wore on, I started clearing a narrow path through their snow, in the hope of sending a not-so-subtle message. A message was indeed sent, but hardly the one I'd intended. A year or two later, another next-door resident - this one, I hasten to add, a terrific neighbor - confided that during her first winter there, she'd assumed the three-condo building had hired someone to do the shoveling.

The recent college grads a few doors down labor under a similar misconception, or at least they did until last week's storm. When my wife gently noted that they risked a citation if they didn't clear their walk, the young woman seemed shocked. She'd always thought city workers did that, she said. (Future mayoral hopefuls, take note.)

Still, life would be much simpler if a platoon of eager shovelers patrolled the neighborhood. But the fact that the snow falls doesn't mean the doorbell will ring, as a proverb might put it. Might, that is, if today's proverb-penners weren't worn out from shoveling.
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« Reply #26 on: January 22, 2011, 06:59:29 PM »

Quote from: kratz on January 22, 2011, 06:24:57 PM

Quote from: Zekester on January 22, 2011, 04:55:53 PM

Quote from: kratz on January 22, 2011, 04:37:51 PM

Quote from: Zekester on January 22, 2011, 02:23:27 PM

Kratz, I think you need to go rub one out.

There was nothing in this thread that was supposed to be inflammatory.

Of course not.

I removed that part from the original post just for you, kratz. Didn't mean to hurt your feelings.

 crybaby

You flatter yourself if you think you are capable of hurting my feelings.

I would think you would want to remove it because nostalgia for the casual racism of your childhood is idiotic...



Thanks for taking that stick out of your ass long enough to use it to point that out.

Quote
Where are the snow shovelers of yesteryear?

When I was a kid in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, a snowstorm was a great entrepreneurial opportunity. As soon as the flakes tailed off, you grabbed your shovel and headed out. You'd ring a doorbell, hope for an older person, and offer to clear the walk for a couple of bucks. The driveway might earn you another five or so.

In a good afternoon of shoveling, you could pocket more than a paperboy made in a month. It was one reason I loved winter. (The other was hooky-bobbing, a should-be Olympic sport where you crept up behind when a car stopped at the corner, grabbed the bumper, and vied for the longest shoe-sled ride along the snowy streets.)

Many decades later, I've arrived at the age where paying someone to shovel seems like a justifiable investment in preventive health care. So where are the earnest young guys eager to make a buck? As far as I can tell, they are all on Facebook or busy texting their pals.

Shovel snow? RUS? G1. LOLOLOLOL. ROFL!

Indeed, during my nearly three decades in Boston, exactly one kid has come by seeking a shoveling job. He worked for about 20 minutes on freeing my car from the snowplowed ridge that held it captive, whittling the wintry berm down to the point where you might possibly have extracted the vehicle if, say, you had a mammoth fork-lift at your disposal. When I noted same, he said he'd settle for half the agreed-on fee - and left me to finish the job.

If you're, um, lucky enough to have some Gen Y-ers in your neighborhood, you can find yourself wondering if they are even aware of what that exotic cold-weather implement with the wooden shaft and wide metal blade is for, let alone know how to use one themselves.

A couple years back, when frigid weather transformed the untended sidewalk next door into a slip-and-fall no man's land, I asked the guys renting there if they'd like to borrow my shovel. Or even my prized ice-piercing spade.

No thanks, one shrugged. We can make it through OK.

As the winter wore on, I started clearing a narrow path through their snow, in the hope of sending a not-so-subtle message. A message was indeed sent, but hardly the one I'd intended. A year or two later, another next-door resident - this one, I hasten to add, a terrific neighbor - confided that during her first winter there, she'd assumed the three-condo building had hired someone to do the shoveling.

The recent college grads a few doors down labor under a similar misconception, or at least they did until last week's storm. When my wife gently noted that they risked a citation if they didn't clear their walk, the young woman seemed shocked. She'd always thought city workers did that, she said. (Future mayoral hopefuls, take note.)

Still, life would be much simpler if a platoon of eager shovelers patrolled the neighborhood. But the fact that the snow falls doesn't mean the doorbell will ring, as a proverb might put it. Might, that is, if today's proverb-penners weren't worn out from shoveling.

Ironrod, we used to have to actually compete for shovelling jobs when I was a kid. Head out earlier, work faster, sale yourself better at the door, etc.

But I have been out myself the past couple winters now making some money on the side. I went out with my brother last winter, and made $180 for about 3hrs work.

Haven't been out yet this winter, though.
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« Reply #27 on: January 22, 2011, 11:02:39 PM »

Quote from: Zekester on January 22, 2011, 06:59:29 PM


Ironrod, we used to have to actually compete for shovelling jobs when I was a kid. Head out earlier, work faster, sale yourself better at the door, etc.

But I have been out myself the past couple winters now making some money on the side. I went out with my brother last winter, and made $180 for about 3hrs work.

Haven't been out yet this winter, though.
Me and my friends used to try to beat each other to the old people's houses because they were always happy to see us...although they wanted to pay Depression prices. Yeah, a nickel and some cookies won't cut it. No, neither will a quarter. A dollar? Throw in the cookies and we've got a deal.

Last time I was shoveling a guy pulled up in a pickup truck. He had a snowblower in back. He said "I see you're almost done, but do you want me to finish it up for you?" Uh, no. Where were you 90 minutes ago? I totally would've given him a dollar and some cookies.

Friend of mine had 3 teenage boys. It had not occurred to him that they could be conscripted for raking and shoveling -- he paid a service to do that. The idea that they might actually have to work in exchange for the money that he gave them was entirely novel to him. He grew up rich and never had to do chores for his money, either. Somewhere along the line it seems like most parents broke that connection.
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« Reply #28 on: January 22, 2011, 11:48:46 PM »

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« Reply #29 on: January 23, 2011, 03:31:44 AM »

I drag raced a lot, right on Main Street. Never killed or hurt anyone.
I drank a lot while driving, and never got in trouble for it; just occassional warnings from cops who told me to go home now.
I shot a kid with a BB air-rifle. My parents never heard about it.
I had a lot of unprotected sex, and never had a child because of it, or any disease for that matter.
I dug massive snow caves, and actual caves in sides of cliffs, and never had a cave-in.
I threw fruit at cars, but never hurt anyone (but survived many foot-chases by pissed-off drivers, including one cop).
I took a car off a carlot for a long joyride, which resulted in a very lengthy footchase by approximately 8 of Mandan, ND's finest. Not caught.
I tried pot exactly once, and got so sick, I swore off drugs from then on. Same with alcohol many years later.
At about age 25, I suddenly quit all risky behavior, and started leading a very quiet life. I figured I was on borrowed time.

I do look back on all that and call it the good old days. Wouldn't change any of it now.
But I also consider myself extremely lucky. Now I'm 50, and it's all I can do to survive a day of work, and then go home.
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« Reply #30 on: January 23, 2011, 02:55:53 PM »

Quote from: Ironrod on January 22, 2011, 11:02:39 PM

Quote from: Zekester on January 22, 2011, 06:59:29 PM


Ironrod, we used to have to actually compete for shovelling jobs when I was a kid. Head out earlier, work faster, sale yourself better at the door, etc.

But I have been out myself the past couple winters now making some money on the side. I went out with my brother last winter, and made $180 for about 3hrs work.

Haven't been out yet this winter, though.
Me and my friends used to try to beat each other to the old people's houses because they were always happy to see us...although they wanted to pay Depression prices. Yeah, a nickel and some cookies won't cut it. No, neither will a quarter. A dollar? Throw in the cookies and we've got a deal.

Last time I was shoveling a guy pulled up in a pickup truck. He had a snowblower in back. He said "I see you're almost done, but do you want me to finish it up for you?" Uh, no. Where were you 90 minutes ago? I totally would've given him a dollar and some cookies.

Friend of mine had 3 teenage boys. It had not occurred to him that they could be conscripted for raking and shoveling -- he paid a service to do that. The idea that they might actually have to work in exchange for the money that he gave them was entirely novel to him. He grew up rich and never had to do chores for his money, either. Somewhere along the line it seems like most parents broke that connection.

Nice article. Man. I used to do everything I could to make some extra scratch growing up. Since there was only a few kids around my age in the neighborhood, we'd work together and figure out ways to get a quarter here or a buck there. Shoveling snow was ALWAYS a top earner. The best was when you were close to being done, the person that hired you brought out a cup of hot chocolate for you. Awesome. Then off to the next house! We never really made all that much money, but it helped get us a few packs of baseball cards or something like that now and again.

Doug Stanhope has a good joke about 'today's kids'. Back when we were kids, the 'next generation of kids were wild and crazy' and each generation got more and more wild and crazy.
Now? Sheesh. When people say 'that town is 20 years behind the times', I'd say - take me there. I had fun 20 years ago.
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« Reply #31 on: January 24, 2011, 05:25:04 PM »

I remember the first time we had cable. I rented a house with my brother and a friend in the late 70's while going to college. I think cable added about 10 stations. It also added a sports station that was nothing but a ticker that gave results. Pre-ESPN!

As a kid we used to play line ball in the street. We played hardball at elementary school and would ride our bikes down blind mountain roads. Today in my neighborhood parents put out orange cones and "Kids" playing signs while their brats play in the street. The only kids I see on bikes are the mormon mission kids in their suits.

What do you think the kids of today will be like as parents when they can't go more than 30 seconds without texting?
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« Reply #32 on: January 24, 2011, 05:56:48 PM »

Times have changed we used to play:

Hide & Go Seek

Red Light IN

Skelly ( One of my favorites)
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« Reply #33 on: January 24, 2011, 08:55:15 PM »

Red Light IN
Skelly

Not familiar with those.

We played truth or dare, but it was 99% all dares lol

I also remember having rifle club in 7th grade. Yup, 7th grade. We shot .22 bolt action rifles at targets in the basement of the school. loved it. Could you imagine that nowadays??
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« Reply #34 on: January 25, 2011, 12:59:47 AM »

Quote from: Zekester on January 21, 2011, 08:09:02 PM

I've often wondered how our teenage years would have been had we had cell phones to communicate with eachother all the time.

Ah, but I miss the days of the phonebooth camp out. It was way too cool when you could manage to get your car or truck close enough and operate it from a rolled down window - a real bitch when you ran out of dimes. Unless of course I was lucky enough to be hanging out with one of my Phone Phreaking friends.  icon_cool
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« Reply #35 on: January 25, 2011, 02:00:16 AM »

a summer day when I was a kid is so different from today.  I would get up about 730am and be out the door by 8,  I always told my parents the nite before, in case they were not up yet, besides, getting out early meant less chance they would "find" something for you to do.  I would grab my bike and head over to my best friends house  ( we are still best friends to this day )  He would grab his bike and then we would either head to the basketball courts or head out to one of the local lakes.  There were tons of lakes nearby and a 10 mile bike ride was just warming up for us. We would proceed to spend the day swimming or playing b-ball, heck we even played tennis at the park on occasion.  If it was tuesday or thursday, the 4H camp had a open swim at the pool for a quarter that ran from 5-8pm.  We rarely missed that.   I almost have a heart attack think about how active I was.  It was a 6 mile bike ride to the pool, we swam for 3 hours and then rode the bikes back home.  I would spend most of the day away from home, checking in for a meal or two and my parents never had to worry about me.
  When I was 18, I was 5'8" and weighed 120 lbs.  Now I weigh almost twice that.  sigh  I miss being a kid.
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« Reply #36 on: January 25, 2011, 05:40:08 PM »

I grew up near two golf courses (public) that had municipal pools. My friends and I would get dropped off in the morning, play golf until we we had enough (27 holes usually) and then would hit the pool for the rest of the day until our ride arrived. One of those still exists but I wonder how many kids take advantage of both nowadays.
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« Reply #37 on: January 25, 2011, 07:32:28 PM »

We didn't have too many friends that had pools, so we either swam in the river or pool-hopped a neighbors pool at night  icon_twisted
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« Reply #38 on: January 25, 2011, 07:43:59 PM »

Quote from: Scuzz on January 21, 2011, 09:43:51 PM

Purge...chillout...... icon_biggrin

Not worked up. biggrin I just think Jay is a flake.

I was born when some of you graduate, and the world was still not as homogenized as it is today (significantly).

My mom always gave me choices:
1) household chores
2) go outside and play

Today, who's kids are outside playing?

MINE. I'll be damned if there isn't another 15 kids on our street, and NONE of them are out playing.
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« Reply #39 on: January 25, 2011, 07:56:55 PM »

Quote from: Zekester on January 25, 2011, 07:32:28 PM

We didn't have too many friends that had pools, so we either swam in the river or pool-hopped a neighbors pool at night  icon_twisted
We had this small pond, Erie or something like that.
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