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Author Topic: Rocky Balboa Impressions (from last night's pre-screening)  (Read 1838 times)
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PeteRock
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« on: December 15, 2006, 05:34:49 PM »

**I will do my best to avoid any major spoilers in the film, referring to specific memorable events only in vague references, allowing you all to experience them without any prior knowledge just as I was able to and to experience the pure raw emotion that I also felt at some special moments in the film.** 

This past Sunday the owner of the Eagles bar our club visits handed out free passes to a Rocky Balboa pre-screening that was held last night in northern Scottsdale.  My wife and I have both been huge Rocky fans for most of our lives, growing up with one of the most famous sports figures to ever come out of the Philadelphia area (the fact that he is a fictional sports figure is irrelevant and rarely mentioned, given our sports history and need to cheer for at least something).

Since the beginning of our relationship, my wife and I have watched the Rocky films more than any other film series.  I have lost count of the lazy Saturdays spent watching the Rocky marathon on TNT.  Regardless of our plans, no matter where we were, if we would wake up to find the Rocky marathon on television, the day’s plans would be cancelled, meetings would be missed, and our day would be spent watching the life and career of one of Philadelphia’s favorite sons.  From Rocky’s first fight against Spider Rico, to when he single-handedly ended the Cold War, my wife and I have always been there, cheering him on as if he were a member of our own family.  Quotes from the Rocky films have become a regular part of our everyday lives, even becoming a part of my proposal to my wife.  Clubber Lang’s eloquent use of the English language has inspired our choice of words on many occasions (I’ve lost count of how many times my wife has told me that she’s going to crucify me……..real bad), Mickey’s witty and endearing comments that kept even one of Philly’s greatest fighters grounded and humble are often heard in our home, and Rocky himself has inspired some of our most memorable conversations, including, “So, uh……..Jaime…….uh…….I was wonderin’ if you would……..uh……mind marryin’ me too much.”  Even our beloved Philadelphia Eagles have incorporated Rocky history into their pre-game preparations, showing memorable scenes from the Rocky films before a game, such as Adrian’s inspiring “win” scene from Rocky II, and Rocky’s famous training montage from the very first film, all while playing the Rocky theme loud enough to rattle the cars passing by on Route 95.  Needless to say, the Rocky films have been a fairly substantial part of our lives, making the closing of such an inspiring and amazing story an important event for us.

This pre-screening has been our most anticipated event of the week.  Not our company Christmas party, our puppy’s First-birthday party, not even the upcoming Eagles game on Sunday (well, perhaps not quite as anticipated as this weekend’s game, but close) have been able to inspire such anticipation.  My wife and I have been humming the Rocky theme since Sunday, watching the Rocky films each night after we get home from work, even calling Simba “Butkus” and a few of our fish “Cuff” and “Link” from time to time.  And the day the famous Rocky legacy would come to a close had finally arrived.

The theater was alive with energy, not a single open seat remaining.  Discussions could be heard from around the theater about various great moments from the film series’ history, debates about which were the best and worst of the legacy were heard from all directions.  It was as if we were attending a family reunion, discussing the amazing life of one of our favorite relatives.

And then the lights dimmed.  I have never been in a room so silent with anticipation, the entire theater leaning forward, anxious for the Rocky theme to begin.  As the initial credits popped up on the screen, one after another, the crowd kept leaning even farther forward, practically unable to contain itself, waiting for the first bar of one of the most famous film themes of all time. Once it began, the entire crowd roared in unison, and then began chanting “Rock-y, Rocky-y, Rocky-y” as if we were in attendance at a real-life fight.  Never has a fictional sports figure had such an impact.  And then, just as quickly as the crowd had erupted, it then fell into complete silence as the film began.

From the opening moments, Rocky Balboa immediately felt as if Sylvester Stallone had made it a point to rediscover what inspired him to make the very first Rocky film, finding that same heart, emotion, and inspiration that helped America to fall in love with the character of Rocky Balboa.  Rocky Balboa felt as if it was meant to pay homage to the greatest films of the series (Rocky I and II), with references to some of our favorite memories, making some of Rocky’s most loyal supporters feel almost as if they’d come home.  Bill Conti himself was back to handle the film’s score, Sylvester Stallone had penned the story and was again behind the camera, and from the opening moments it was apparent that Stallone took this film very seriously, wanting to give fans of the series a fitting end to one of the most inspiring underdog stories of our time.  And before I go on, I would like to say that this was by far the most emotional Rocky film in the series, both for the viewers, and I also believe for Sylvester Stallone himself.

**Now that I plan to discuss some of the story, I will provide a minor spoiler warning for those who do not want to read any further, and are content with the part of my review that I’ve presented thus far.  Feel free to move on to the final portion of my review to learn of my final thoughts on the film.**

Spoiler for Hiden:
The film opens with beautiful scenes of the city of Philadelphia, from the Liberty Towers, to Boathouse Row, and finally to South Philly, the fictional birthplace of Rocky Balboa.  The scenes were beautifully cut, and they showed the Philly I remember.  I was immediately homesick, remembering all of what I loved about the City of Brotherly Love.  Rocky awakens on a cold Philadelphia morning, with only a picture of his beloved Adrian by his side on the nightstand, and already you are treated to references to the first two films in the series.

The story of Rocky Balboa begins with the anniversary of the death of Rocky’s personal strength, the real “rock” that helped to inspire him to do such great things, his amazing wife Adrian.  Rocky and his brother-in-law Paulie visit Adrian’s gravesite, with Paulie making his usual comments meant to disguise his true feelings, and Rocky struggling to deal with such a substantial loss.  As they have done in years past since Adrian’s passing, Rocky and Paulie had plans to tour some of the more memorable locations where Rocky and Adrian shared some of their most special moments, such as the old pet shop, the ice skating rink, and Rocky’s old apartment.  While visiting the site of the old ice skating rink, which has since been torn down, we finally see Paulie’s sarcastic armor finally begin to crumble, as he comes to regret his poor treatment of Adrian, and his inability to cope with the loss of a person he felt he never showed enough love toward.  It is a moving scene that finally shows Paulie’s true feelings no longer disguised behind sarcastic comments and bottles of liquor.

Paulie then storms off due to overwhelming guilt, and Rocky proceeds on to an old bar he used to frequent years ago.  It is here that he meets a person from his past, a woman who was once a young girl who used to hang on the corner of the old Atomic Hoagie shop.  And it is here that you begin to see the underlying theme of the film.  Dealing with aging, coping with losing things (such as loved ones, and sources of strength) from your past, and trying to get back up after being beaten down, but this time not by an opponent, but by life.  Rocky has obviously physically come along in years, but his knowledge and wisdom has also aged with him.  He is no longer the ignorant, naďve kid from the neighborhood.  Rocky has experienced a lot in his life, and through the distinctive Rocky-esque delivery you can immediately tell that he is obviously a much more intelligent and knowledgeable man, made apparent by various “speeches” he gives throughout the film that show just how much this man has learned in his life, and how far along he has come since that first fight with Spider Rico a number of decades ago.  But even though he has learned so much, he still doesn’t quite know how to deal with this next phase in his life, which involves coping with loss.  Rocky was never prepared for this day to come, for the day when his strength, his inspiration, his wife Adrian would no longer be with him. 

As the film progresses you learn of Rocky’s son and his unwillingness to live under his father’s enormous shadow.  He has made it a point to be everything his father is not.  He is educated, working in Center City in an office setting, maintaining higher-class friends, dressing in suits instead of boxing trunks, working with a pen instead of boxing gloves.  And you learn that he resents his father, and blames his father for having such an overwhelming shadow, making his own pursuit of success seemingly more challenging and difficult.  He almost never makes it a point to see his own father, and is rarely willing to make time for him.

And then we are treated to more beautiful scenes of Philadelphia as Rocky shops for supplies for his restaurant, named Adrian’s, of course.  He shops at one of Philadelphia’s most famous locales, The Italian Market in South Philly.  When he arrives at his restaurant, you soon discover another character from Rocky’s past, and you start to see a trend in Rocky’s lifestyle.  He is trying to help all that he can, showing just how much he has learned from a difficult life and his willingness to help all those who may have it a little tougher than him. 

As most know from the film’s trailer, eventually ESPN shows a computer-generated fight pitting the current boxing champion, Mason “The Line” Dixon, a hated fighter who is meant to epitomize the sorry state modern boxing is in, against Rocky Balboa, one of the most respected and loved boxers to have ever fought in the ring.

And, as most of you already know, the computer-generated fight determines Rocky Balboa as the winner.  This creates some unrest in Dixon’s camp, mainly with his publicist and manager, who mainly see this as an opportunity to make money, and this also helps Rocky to identify that he still has something holed up inside, a beast that is locked in his own “basement,” and until this beast is let go, he will be unable to move on with his life.  Following this realization, we are then treated to one of the most emotional and gut-wrenching scenes I’ve ever experienced in a Rocky film.  Rocky explains to his closest friend Paulie his reasons to want to fight again, and about the holed up, unresolved problems locked in his “basement,” and during this scene I don’t think there was a dry eye in the theater, including my own.  It was probably by far the most memorable scene in the film, and also one of the most moving of any Rocky movie, ranking up there with (and perhaps surpassing) Rocky’s outburst at Mickey in the first film for his sudden interest in managing Rocky after the announcement of the fight with Apollo.                             

Rocky then decides to apply for a boxing license, and you again get to see the knowledge and wisdom Rocky has developed over the years when he addresses the boxing panel.  Rocky has come a long way since his days of collecting at the docks, and you almost can’t help but feel a sense of pride in just how far he has come.  Shortly after earning his boxing license, Rocky is approached by Mason Dixon’s publicist and manager, who are hoping to pump some life back into the world of boxing.  They propose an exhibition fight between a respected champion of the past against a current champion of the present.

Not wanting to tell the entire film’s story, I’ve left out various story elements of the film that continue to showcase Rocky’s maturity, and that continue to add to the emotional weight of the film, but I don’t want to give everything away.  This is by far the most emotional Rocky film in the series, and except for the most cynical of the group, I doubt there will be many who can make it through with dry eyes, especially those who have grown up with Rocky as part of their own family, just as we have.  Just as Rocky has emotional items stored up in his basement that he needs to get out with the help of fighting again, this film also helps the audience to release some stored up emotion.  You can’t help to get emotional right along with Rocky himself, and even his friend Paulie.

Eventually we reach the inevitable, the Rocky Training Montage™.  But because of Rocky’s age and number of years in the ring, he now takes a different approach to training, and works on building pure physical power.  Because he no longer has the speed or endurance, he must now focus on sheer strength.  I felt that the training was a little too short, when compared with Rocky films of old, but it was nice to see a different type of training, and they really helped you to feel just how strong Rocky was becoming based on his training methods.  As his trainer put it so eloquently, Dixon would feel like he was trying to kiss a moving freight train.

And all that I have explained of the film thus far leads us to the one inherent part of every Rocky film, an epic boxing match.  And all I will say of the fight is this:  it is truly epic.  The filming style, the choice of colors, the flashbacks, it all made for one amazing battle between boxers.  The parrying between boxers was mind-blowing, the use and timing of Conti’s musical score was perfect, and the progression of the fight was just awesome.  I’m rarely a man at a loss for words, but I don’t think I blinked or even breathed during the match.  I don’t think I can put it more eloquently than:  It was FUCKING AWESOME.  Wow.

For those who have not read through the portion of my review that contains minor spoilers, I’ll summarize my thoughts here.  Rocky Balboa is by far the most emotional film in the Rocky series.  By far.  Even Adrian’s coma in Rocky II does not compare with Rocky’s emotional battle in this film, especially when you see how it affects Paulie.  Rocky is a man who has experienced a great deal in his life, and he has come a long way from the punk boxer collecting at the docks.  His knowledge and wisdom is made apparent on more than one occasion in the film, and you can’t help but feel a sense of pride in Rocky’s progression, and a feeling of respect for such a wise man.  The story is moving, the emotion is powerful, the fight is epic, the humor is spot-on, and the final chapter in the Rocky legacy is a fitting end to one of the most inspiring underdog stories I have ever seen.  Granted, it is not without its faults, such as a training montage that felt a bit short, an overall film length that felt a bit short due to characters not being as well-developed as I would have preferred and storylines not receiving as much focus as I would have liked, but it is apparent that Sylvester Stallone took this film very seriously, and he treated this final chapter with the utmost respect, which couldn’t have been made more obvious by his exit out of the boxing arena following his fight with Mason Dixon.

Rocky Balboa is a perfect end to the Rocky legacy, and because saying goodbye can oftentimes be rather emotional, it seems perfectly fitting for the final film in the Rocky legacy to be the most emotional of the series.  Rocky Balboa is an emotional goodbye to a close friend.

And when you see this film you owe it to yourself to stay until the final credits.  There is a still scene that manages to encompass the entire Rocky universe in one final shot, and it shows Sylvester Stallone saying his final goodbye to what can only be described as a legacy.

Yo, Adrian.  We did it.
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« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2006, 05:37:11 PM »

Great writeup -- thanks!!

My wife has never seen any of these; I've had Rocky and Rocky 2 in the queue for a while to rectify that.  I'll need to see this, but I confess I may wait for DVD after 4 and 5, which were not quite my cups of tea...
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« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2006, 05:39:23 PM »

Quote from: JLu on December 15, 2006, 05:37:11 PM

Great writeup -- thanks!!

My wife has never seen any of these; I've had Rocky and Rocky 2 in the queue for a while to rectify that.  I'll need to see this, but I confess I may wait for DVD after 4 and 5, which were not quite my cups of tea...

This film almost ignores that IV and V even existed, and really focuses on the history of the first two films, which in my opinion were the best of the series.  Right now I currently would rank I and II at the top of my list, followed by Rocky Balboa, III, IV, and finally V.  I think it was that good.

Also, it's worth noting that the humor in the film is actually quite funny, especially some of Paulie's gems.  Very good writing, excellent dialogue, great delivery, and some entertaining and also some emotional moments all stemming from fantastic acting and delivery.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2006, 06:37:52 PM by PeteRock » Logged

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« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2006, 06:44:50 PM »

I almost teared up just reading your writeup! 

Must be a Philly thing.

Thanks Pete.
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« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2006, 06:56:44 PM »

I am truly excited about this movie and I've never seen I or II.

I've seen the fight from II, of course, or the best moments of it at least at the beginning of III.

III is one of my greatest movie memories from childhood.  Mr. T and Hulk Hogan? Come on!

I watched Rocky IV again just a couple of years ago and I was screaming my head off.  What a great movie.

V should never have been made.

I've been meaning to do I and II...maybe I'll rent em.

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« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2006, 06:59:12 PM »

Quote from: ATB on December 15, 2006, 06:56:44 PM

I am truly excited about this movie and I've never seen I or II.

First you reveal that you've never played a Monkey Island game and now this?  <Shakes head in wonder>
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« Reply #6 on: December 15, 2006, 09:06:25 PM »

Quote from: ATB on December 15, 2006, 06:56:44 PM

I am truly excited about this movie and I've never seen I or II.

 :icon_eek:

I think having seen I and II really adds to one's appreciation of Rocky Balboa.  These are classic films that really provide not just the boxing history but the human and emotional history of Rocky's life. 

Quote
I've seen the fight from II, of course, or the best moments of it at least at the beginning of III.

There is so much more to these films than just the final fights, which all adds to the emotional impact of Rocky Balboa.  The fights are a small portion of the Rocky mythos.  Rocky's relationships, heart, dedication, desire, and inspiring love story are all what made the Rocky films great, not necessarily just the fights.  And this same thing is what makes Rocky Balboa such an emotional film.  If you know and can appreciate the drama and emotion inherent in Rocky's life, and the hard emotional times he is currently going through, only then can you truly appreciate what is taking place in the most recent and final chapter.   

Quote
III is one of my greatest movie memories from childhood.  Mr. T and Hulk Hogan? Come on!

Yes, III had some fantastic dialogue and great drama, but it just doesn't compare, at all, with I and II.  There's just no comparison.

Quote
I watched Rocky IV again just a couple of years ago and I was screaming my head off.  What a great movie.

IV is actually a fairly week film in the series, but when people attempt to explain just how bad IV really was, once you acknowledge that Rocky Balboa single-handedly stopped the Cold War himself, only then can you appreciate the pure, unadulterated film gold that is Rocky IV.   icon_wink

Quote
V should never have been made.

Stallone's vision was never realized or fully fleshed-out.  While the story had some merit, the overall execution was absolutely terrible.  What is nice about Rocky Balboa is it mainly acknowledges the best films in the series (I and II), and almost ignores the rest.  III wasn't a terrible film, but it was the beginning of a downward spiral.  Rocky Balboa starts back at the beginning, when Rocky (the film and the man) was in its prime.  It goes back to its routes, to the best films in the series, and pays homage to some of the finest memories in Rocky's history (his time with his wife, the person who gave him strength and desire, the person who helped him to achieve greatness, who stood by his side and supported him no matter what, not his fights).

The Rocky films are ultimately a drawn-out love story, a dramatic telling of just how imporant love can be, and how much strength it can bring to a relationship.  Rocky is about relationships, about friendship, about love, it's about a fighter's life, not about fighting.  And most importantly, it's about life.  It's not about how hard you can hit.  It's about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward.   

Quote
I've been meaning to do I and II...maybe I'll rent em.

You should.  Especially before you see Rocky Balboa.  Once you watch them, and then go into this film, you will then realize the imporance of the back-story and how important it is to experiencing the full emotional impact of Rocky Balboa.
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« Reply #7 on: December 15, 2006, 10:57:36 PM »

Wow, excellent writeup!  I'm so there when this opens...I've been looking forward to this for a while.  Its good to hear that it'll be such a great endcap to such a great series.  Thanks Pete!
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« Reply #8 on: December 16, 2006, 12:34:30 AM »

I liked Rocky I & II, never saw any of the others.

I had no intention of seeing this new one, but now I do.

Stallone should cut you a check Pete because your write up sold that movie.
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« Reply #9 on: December 16, 2006, 06:20:23 AM »

Nice write up Pete, I'm sold.  The wife and I will be there on opening day.
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« Reply #10 on: December 16, 2006, 05:24:56 PM »

I appreciate the compliments, guys.  I did my best to sum up my feelings on the Rocky legacy, and it felt good to put this write-up together.  Needless to say, I'm a huge Rocky fan, having even gone so far as to propose to my wife by doing one of my best Rocky impersonations to date, using the same proposal, word-for-word, as in Rocky II.  But that's a whole different story.  It was far more tasteful than it sounds, and appropriate given the history with my wife.   ninja

The more I think about it, and the more times I see the trailer on TV, the more I realize just how much I liked this film.  Now, keep in mind, it is far from being without faults, but they're nitpicky at best.  For example, the training montage felt a bit short, some of the character development could have been fleshed out a little better, and the film could have used at least another 30 minutes for the aforementioned shortcomings, but as it stands, never once did I look at my watch, never once did I feel disappointed while watching the film, rarely was there a dry eye in the house, and when the credits started to roll, I felt that sense of closure that has been lacking since Rocky V.  As Rocky's character needed to find closure in his own life, so did Sylvester Stallone and the Rocky fan base, and Rocky Balboa has given us all that closure we've needed.  When I left the theater, all I could think to myself was, "Yo, Adrian.  We did it."  And that's exactly how this film felt.  It was a tearful goodbye, and Stallone has helped us all to let go of that beast we've all had in our basements since Rocky V. 

The shortcomings I touched on will be subtle but apparent to some, and perhaps glaring to others, but having gone into this movie with reserved hopes because of some of the past abominations, it was fairly challenging to even find the faults I discuss above.  Rocky Balboa brings back that raw emotion we all felt while watching the first two films in the series, the cinematography is reminiscent of the earlier films, the story returned to being about a man from South Philadelphia instead of about fighting, and like with the original film, the build-up to the final fight is enough to have you practically falling forward out of your seat, and when the final fight comes to a close, few will be disappointed.     

Perhaps some of my emotion is due to the Rocky films being such an integral part of my life (watching the Rocky marathon with my wife every time it's on television, quoting from the films in everyday conversations, getting to see my favorite city shown in such a respectful light, the inspiring underdog story, etc).  And there is just something about being from Philadelphia.  The character of Rocky Balboa is such an important part of Philadelphia history, having inspired a real-life statue, and making the act of running up the stairs of the Art Museum a right of passage of sorts for anyone who lives in or even visits the City of Brotherly Love.  But being such an avid fan, and having been terribly disappointed in the past, it would take a lot for me to accept a film as appropriate closure to such an inspiring legacy.  And I received all I was looking for, and then some.

I'm looking forward to hearing what other fans of the series will have to say.  Many people will not give this film a chance, but hopefully my review has helped some to reconsider and give Stallone one last chance to give us that closure to the Rocky legacy that we've all needed.  And I think you will be happy that you did.  The first two Rocky films are probably two of my favorite films of all time, and I am almost surprised to say that Rocky Balboa now ranks up there as well, mainly for the raw emotion Sylvester Stallone managed to get out of me and all who attended the pre-screening.  I'm not embarassed to say that I practically cried through most of the movie, as did my wife, but they were tears of joy and pride in watching how far such a special man has come, as well as tears of loss for knowing that such a beloved character was saying his final goodbyes in such a special and heartfelt way.  But all I can ask is that you give Rocky Balboa a shot, just as we all did back in 1976.           
« Last Edit: December 16, 2006, 05:30:46 PM by PeteRock » Logged

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« Reply #11 on: December 16, 2006, 06:18:10 PM »

Quote
I appreciate the compliments, guys.  I did my best to sum up my feelings on the Rocky legacy, and it felt good to put this write-up together.  Needless to say, I'm a huge Rocky fan, having even gone so far as to propose to my wife by doing one of my best Rocky impersonations to date, using the same proposal, word-for-word, as in Rocky II.  But that's a whole different story.  It was far more tasteful than it sounds, and appropriate given the history with my wife.   
You met her in a pet shop buying 'animals' named Cuff and Link?  slywink

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having gone into this movie with reserved hopes because of some of the past abominations,
That is me in a nutshell. I really want to have high hopes for this movie, and you are bolstering that hope with your writeup. 
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