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Author Topic: [movie] Deadpool  (Read 2023 times)
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Scraper
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« Reply #40 on: February 17, 2016, 07:55:50 PM »

Quote from: Bullwinkle on February 16, 2016, 11:05:51 PM

Quote from: naednek on February 16, 2016, 09:50:21 PM

Quote from: Bullwinkle on February 15, 2016, 07:29:07 AM

Quote from: Destructor on February 15, 2016, 04:52:19 AM

Quote from: drifter on February 15, 2016, 03:58:54 AM

Great movie but WTH parents why are there kids like 7 years old at the movie?  Congrats to the Mom and her 4 kids all young that now know what exactly a strip club is like inside and what goes on in there.

As a joke, it took me like 5 seconds to Google up 'Why is Deadpool rated R?' and find out exactly why so thanks to IMDB.

...why can't parents do so?

Because it doesn't occur to them that they have to do that.

The kids want to see the movie.  All the parents see is a poster for Marvel and what looks like a regular superhero on it.  They've been to Marvel movies before, and it has never been a problem.  Why would they even think to check if this one is an outlier?

The studio has done what they could with the previews and such, but if the parents haven't seen that, there's not much to do. 

The only time to be sure the message is getting to the parents is at the point of sale.  I feel like the onus should be on the theater to point out when they are buying or picking up the tickets that the movie is rated R.  I get it, they don't want to give a refund, but the backlash could be really bad.

Umm maybe because it has a rating that people should use as a guideline...

Seriously?

there should still be a societal obligation to point out to a parent that this movie is an outlier from every other Marvel movie that has come before.  Again.

Seriously? There is a societal obligation in place, it's called the Rating System. It's there for movies like this. If a parent can't take the 2 seconds it takes to look at the rating of a movie (Which is on the Movie poster, the board that lists the show times, the ticket, and prominently displayed before the movie actually starts, among other places) then they have terrible parenting skills and the their kids seeing an R rated film is the least of their issues.
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Bullwinkle
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« Reply #41 on: February 17, 2016, 08:39:23 PM »

Quote from: Scraper on February 17, 2016, 07:55:50 PM

Quote from: Bullwinkle on February 16, 2016, 11:05:51 PM

Quote from: naednek on February 16, 2016, 09:50:21 PM

Quote from: Bullwinkle on February 15, 2016, 07:29:07 AM

Quote from: Destructor on February 15, 2016, 04:52:19 AM

Quote from: drifter on February 15, 2016, 03:58:54 AM

Great movie but WTH parents why are there kids like 7 years old at the movie?  Congrats to the Mom and her 4 kids all young that now know what exactly a strip club is like inside and what goes on in there.

As a joke, it took me like 5 seconds to Google up 'Why is Deadpool rated R?' and find out exactly why so thanks to IMDB.

...why can't parents do so?

Because it doesn't occur to them that they have to do that.

The kids want to see the movie.  All the parents see is a poster for Marvel and what looks like a regular superhero on it.  They've been to Marvel movies before, and it has never been a problem.  Why would they even think to check if this one is an outlier?

The studio has done what they could with the previews and such, but if the parents haven't seen that, there's not much to do.  

The only time to be sure the message is getting to the parents is at the point of sale.  I feel like the onus should be on the theater to point out when they are buying or picking up the tickets that the movie is rated R.  I get it, they don't want to give a refund, but the backlash could be really bad.

Umm maybe because it has a rating that people should use as a guideline...

Seriously?

there should still be a societal obligation to point out to a parent that this movie is an outlier from every other Marvel movie that has come before.  Again.

Seriously? There is a societal obligation in place, it's called the Rating System. It's there for movies like this. If a parent can't take the 2 seconds it takes to look at the rating of a movie (Which is on the Movie poster, the board that lists the show times, the ticket, and prominently displayed before the movie actually starts, among other places) then they have terrible parenting skills and the their kids seeing an R rated film is the least of their issues.

So what you're saying is, rather than try to understand where a frazzled parent might be coming from and helping them out or even seeing why, in a society where we're all trying to live together, they might be making a mistake, you would rather be irate at the parent and not only not try to understand how they might have gotten to this position, you would condemn them as just being terrible parents.

Nice.

You really can't open your brain the tiniest bit to see where someone might have gotten to the point of seeing "Marvel" and thinking kids' movie?  Really?  I can't believe I have to ask this again, but here we go: Why would they even bother to look for the "R"?  It doesn't matter if it's on the billboard behind the cashier.  If you look up at that thing, what info are you looking for?  You might be making sure the movie you're supposed to be seeing is actually at this theater, but otherwise, you're just looking at the time, so you can tell the cashier what showing you're there for.  I couldn't tell you the last time I checked a rating at the ticket booth.  

Who the hell looks at anything on their ticket after they get it?

And look at these posters:  









Not an R on there.  

And where the hell did you see the rating prominently displayed before the movie starts?  I have never seen that.  I didn't even get a red band trailer when I saw Deadpool.

I guarantee that the only thing these parents are aware of when they walk in with their kids is that they're getting a brief distraction respite with a Marvel movie.  They've done it before, many times.  Why would this time be any different?

Did you know that most accidents happen within two miles of a person's home?  Do you know why that is?  It's because you've driven those roads so many times, you've gotten familiar with their patterns.  Blind to them, even.  So, when you come to a small intersection where there has never been another car coming another way in your entire life, but this one time there is, your muscles and mind are so used to just going anyway, that you do it.  Boom, you've had an accident.  Was it your fault?  Absolutely.  Is it understandable?  I think so.  But if there is someone else on the sidewalk seeing it happen, do you think they should speak up to keep it from happening?  Even though it won't be their responsibility either way?  Or would not doing that and calling the guy a bad driver be the better route?

I wonder if people think I'm trying to condemn the movie or the studio or the theater for any of this stuff.  I'm not.  That's not my point at all.  I'm just shocked that people don't think it would be nice for them to have some compassion and give these understandably clueless parents a nudge in the right direction instead of washing their hands of the whole thing and condemning the parents along the way.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2016, 08:41:59 PM by Bullwinkle » Logged

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« Reply #42 on: February 17, 2016, 08:51:47 PM »

Your car analogy is so far removed from this scenario that it's like comparing a distracted driver to a mother who doesn't care. More on point where is the line that you would like to draw between personal responsibility and the nanny state? I mean the movie is called Deadpool, in order to even buy the tickets she would have to say please give me tickets for DEADPOOL. The name itself implies that this isn't your average Marvel movie, if that doesn't tell you that you should look at the rating then I don't know what does.
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« Reply #43 on: February 17, 2016, 09:29:38 PM »

Quote from: Scraper on February 17, 2016, 08:51:47 PM

Your car analogy is so far removed from this scenario that it's like comparing a distracted driver to a mother who doesn't care. More on point where is the line that you would like to draw between personal responsibility and the nanny state? I mean the movie is called Deadpool, in order to even buy the tickets she would have to say please give me tickets for DEADPOOL. The name itself implies that this isn't your average Marvel movie, if that doesn't tell you that you should look at the rating then I don't know what does.

The name argument is just ridiculous.  Again, Hellboy was not an issue for this same age of kid.  "Deadpool" just sounds like a superhero name.  It's not like "Kick-Ass" which I'm sure raised some eyebrows.

And I see where your disconnect is and how you won't be able to see your way clear to the other side here.

The car analogy is spot-on, and your follow up sentence shows why.  The mother is exactly like a distracted driver in this scenario.  You are assuming that she doesn't care and are putting that on her because you don't want to be empathetic, and it's easier to dismiss her.  I don't think I can get through that, so I guess we'll just have to leave it.
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« Reply #44 on: February 18, 2016, 03:12:02 PM »

I can understand both sides of this argument...
1) I think if the movie theaters are selling a Rated R ticket to an adult with kids, it wouldn't hurt to remind that that they are buying tickets to a Rated R movie. Obviously, this wouldn't help for online sales or anything (they could put up a warning as well though) nor would it help for the parents that drop their kids off at the concession stand/video games while they go buy a ticket.
2) I think that some responsibility does need to go on the parents. They should attempt to be more aware and I am sure that Deadpool has fixed the issue for some of them.
3) There were parents complaining at my showing and saying how could they release and R Rated superhero film, so I can see where the disconnect was, but again, the parents need to take some responsibility.
4) Again, at my showing, multiple parents left after the first 5 minutes or so when they realized what was happening. Other parents with young children, say 7-10 range did stay for the whole thing and that was their choice.
5) for the rated R thing I know I have been to many movies where they did the whole, "the following movie is rated r" thing. I wasn't paying attention enough to confirm if they did this for deadpool. If they did, nobody left until after the movie started.
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« Reply #45 on: February 18, 2016, 06:26:54 PM »

Quote from: Punisher on February 18, 2016, 03:12:02 PM

I can understand both sides of this argument...
1) I think if the movie theaters are selling a Rated R ticket to an adult with kids, it wouldn't hurt to remind that that they are buying tickets to a Rated R movie. Obviously, this wouldn't help for online sales or anything (they could put up a warning as well though) nor would it help for the parents that drop their kids off at the concession stand/video games while they go buy a ticket.
2) I think that some responsibility does need to go on the parents. They should attempt to be more aware and I am sure that Deadpool has fixed the issue for some of them.
3) There were parents complaining at my showing and saying how could they release and R Rated superhero film, so I can see where the disconnect was, but again, the parents need to take some responsibility.
4) Again, at my showing, multiple parents left after the first 5 minutes or so when they realized what was happening. Other parents with young children, say 7-10 range did stay for the whole thing and that was their choice.
5) for the rated R thing I know I have been to many movies where they did the whole, "the following movie is rated r" thing. I wasn't paying attention enough to confirm if they did this for deadpool. If they did, nobody left until after the movie started.

That doesn't sound like both sides so much as what I've been saying.
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« Reply #46 on: February 18, 2016, 07:46:21 PM »



Anyway...   


EDIT: just to be extra clear, I meant that as Deadpool is sad his thread has devolved into argument, not a criticism of anybody here.
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« Reply #47 on: February 18, 2016, 08:33:02 PM »

Quote from: EngineNo9 on February 18, 2016, 07:46:21 PM



Anyway...   


EDIT: just to be extra clear, I meant that as Deadpool is sad his thread has devolved into argument, not a criticism of anybody here.

Truth.  Lets get back to talking about how awesome the movie is.
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« Reply #48 on: February 19, 2016, 08:04:30 AM »

R rated movies always have a ratings splash screen before the movie starts
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« Reply #49 on: February 19, 2016, 03:39:40 PM »

Quote from: Harkonis on February 19, 2016, 08:04:30 AM

R rated movies always have a ratings splash screen before the movie starts

Maybe at the theater you're going to, I have never seen that.  Trailers have them, of course.
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« Reply #50 on: February 19, 2016, 10:21:37 PM »

Quote from: Bullwinkle on February 17, 2016, 08:39:23 PM



Did you know that most accidents happen within two miles of a person's home?  Do you know why that is?  It's because you've driven those roads so many times, you've gotten familiar with their patterns.  Blind to them, even.  So, when you come to a small intersection where there has never been another car coming another way in your entire life, but this one time there is, your muscles and mind are so used to just going anyway, that you do it.  Boom, you've had an accident.  Was it your fault?  Absolutely.  Is it understandable?  I think so.  But if there is someone else on the sidewalk seeing it happen, do you think they should speak up to keep it from happening?  Even though it won't be their responsibility either way?  Or would not doing that and calling the guy a bad driver be the better route?


Actually I'm pretty sure that the reason that most accidents occur within two miles of home is because every trip begins and ends there.  That means that the first two miles and last two miles of every trip falls into this statistic.  So every time you left your house you would have to travel a minimum of 4 miles from your home in a straight line in order to spend more than half your time beyond the 2 miles from home boundary.  If you counted up the time an average person spends in their car, the % that were within this two mile boundary will normally be well above 50%.
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« Reply #51 on: February 19, 2016, 10:34:11 PM »

Watching Deadpool again with my wife this weekend. The movie is a perfect 10 for me in entertainment value, and Colossus (my favorite XMEN of all time) was finally done right IMO
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« Reply #52 on: February 20, 2016, 04:47:01 AM »

I loved how much fourth wall breaking he was doing, but somehow they kept that aspect flowing as part of the movie, instead of a constant series of annoying cut aways. Jokes making fun of the comics, himself, Marvel stupidity, and even his stint as Green Lantern.
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« Reply #53 on: February 20, 2016, 06:55:46 AM »

Quote from: TheEgoWhip on February 19, 2016, 10:21:37 PM

Quote from: Bullwinkle on February 17, 2016, 08:39:23 PM



Did you know that most accidents happen within two miles of a person's home?  Do you know why that is?  It's because you've driven those roads so many times, you've gotten familiar with their patterns.  Blind to them, even.  So, when you come to a small intersection where there has never been another car coming another way in your entire life, but this one time there is, your muscles and mind are so used to just going anyway, that you do it.  Boom, you've had an accident.  Was it your fault?  Absolutely.  Is it understandable?  I think so.  But if there is someone else on the sidewalk seeing it happen, do you think they should speak up to keep it from happening?  Even though it won't be their responsibility either way?  Or would not doing that and calling the guy a bad driver be the better route?


Actually I'm pretty sure that the reason that most accidents occur within two miles of home is because every trip begins and ends there.  That means that the first two miles and last two miles of every trip falls into this statistic.  So every time you left your house you would have to travel a minimum of 4 miles from your home in a straight line in order to spend more than half your time beyond the 2 miles from home boundary.  If you counted up the time an average person spends in their car, the % that were within this two mile boundary will normally be well above 50%.

While that may be a factor, studies have shown otherwise.

Quote
"Our research suggests that many drivers appear to be in a comfort zone when driving close to home on familiar roads, hence why such a large proportion of accidents occur there," said Brian Martin, managing director of Elephant.co.uk.
"It's so important to keep a full level of concentration when driving, whether you're just popping to the shops or starting or ending a longer journey. These results emphasise this even more.
"It's interesting to note that the type of accidents people most commonly have close to home happen at lower speeds and involve less impact. In fact, these accidents could involve people simply manoeuvring in or out of their driveway.
"It's vital people stay alert and avoid complacency when driving close to home."

Quote
Progressive’s survey also shed some interesting light on other factors that may tend to lead toward the higher likelihood of auto accidents occurring close to home.  Progressive also surveyed seat belt usage close to home, driving distractions, and the frequency of driving errors that occur within a five mile radius of people’s homes.  The survey found that seat belt usage is much less frequent when driving closer to home than on longer commutes.

Also, people tend to talk on cell phones, listen to iPods, and eat while driving when closer to home as well.  A major cause of these increased driving distractions is that people tend to have a false sense of security when driving close to home, or in familiar areas, a factor that could lead to the high percentage of auto accidents close to home.

Car accident safety experts recommend that when driving close to home, you should not be fooled into having a false sense of security.  Drivers need to be twice as cautious when driving near home and be on the lookout for distracted and careless drivers.  Simply being aware of the fact that the likelihood of an auto accident increases dramatically the closer you are to home may save you from possibly becoming involved in a car accident.

Quote
driving close to home
You might think the drowsiness that accompanies a long road trip is more of a threat than cruising around your neighborhood. But car accidents often take place within  miles of home. While this is due to the fact that most driving occurs close to home, the relaxation we feel caused by the repetition of driving through our own neighborhood likely plays a role.

If you've ever gotten home from work only to realize that your brain was on auto-pilot the whole drive, then you know this phenomenon. Driving in familiar places can cause us to rely more on muscle memory than on our active driving skills (making us less likely to be hyper-vigilant on the road).

The 2 most important things you can do to stay safe on a short neighborhood ride are the same things that will protect you on any ride: stay alert and buckle up. Seems like a no-brainer, but being active about these things really does make you a better, safer driver.

Try not to fall into a comfort zone when you're approaching your humble abode (or hilltop mansion). Even though you may know the route like the back of your hand, accidents are often caused by unpredictable elements like another driver, a crossing animal, or car equipment failure. And letting your guard down can decrease your responsiveness behind the wheel.

The stats also suggest the importance of buckling your seat belt even if you're just driving around the corner. A main reason drivers give for skipping on seat belts, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), is that they're only going a short distance. But buckling up, even close to home, is a habit worth getting into.
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« Reply #54 on: February 21, 2016, 03:15:37 AM »

Quote from: Bullwinkle on February 20, 2016, 06:55:46 AM

Quote from: TheEgoWhip on February 19, 2016, 10:21:37 PM

Quote from: Bullwinkle on February 17, 2016, 08:39:23 PM



Did you know that most accidents happen within two miles of a person's home?  Do you know why that is?  It's because you've driven those roads so many times, you've gotten familiar with their patterns.  Blind to them, even.  So, when you come to a small intersection where there has never been another car coming another way in your entire life, but this one time there is, your muscles and mind are so used to just going anyway, that you do it.  Boom, you've had an accident.  Was it your fault?  Absolutely.  Is it understandable?  I think so.  But if there is someone else on the sidewalk seeing it happen, do you think they should speak up to keep it from happening?  Even though it won't be their responsibility either way?  Or would not doing that and calling the guy a bad driver be the better route?


Actually I'm pretty sure that the reason that most accidents occur within two miles of home is because every trip begins and ends there.  That means that the first two miles and last two miles of every trip falls into this statistic.  So every time you left your house you would have to travel a minimum of 4 miles from your home in a straight line in order to spend more than half your time beyond the 2 miles from home boundary.  If you counted up the time an average person spends in their car, the % that were within this two mile boundary will normally be well above 50%.

While that may be a factor, studies have shown otherwise.

Quote
"Our research suggests that many drivers appear to be in a comfort zone when driving close to home on familiar roads, hence why such a large proportion of accidents occur there," said Brian Martin, managing director of Elephant.co.uk.
"It's so important to keep a full level of concentration when driving, whether you're just popping to the shops or starting or ending a longer journey. These results emphasise this even more.
"It's interesting to note that the type of accidents people most commonly have close to home happen at lower speeds and involve less impact. In fact, these accidents could involve people simply manoeuvring in or out of their driveway.
"It's vital people stay alert and avoid complacency when driving close to home."

Quote
Progressive’s survey also shed some interesting light on other factors that may tend to lead toward the higher likelihood of auto accidents occurring close to home.  Progressive also surveyed seat belt usage close to home, driving distractions, and the frequency of driving errors that occur within a five mile radius of people’s homes.  The survey found that seat belt usage is much less frequent when driving closer to home than on longer commutes.

Also, people tend to talk on cell phones, listen to iPods, and eat while driving when closer to home as well.  A major cause of these increased driving distractions is that people tend to have a false sense of security when driving close to home, or in familiar areas, a factor that could lead to the high percentage of auto accidents close to home.

Car accident safety experts recommend that when driving close to home, you should not be fooled into having a false sense of security.  Drivers need to be twice as cautious when driving near home and be on the lookout for distracted and careless drivers.  Simply being aware of the fact that the likelihood of an auto accident increases dramatically the closer you are to home may save you from possibly becoming involved in a car accident.

Quote
driving close to home
You might think the drowsiness that accompanies a long road trip is more of a threat than cruising around your neighborhood. But car accidents often take place within  miles of home. While this is due to the fact that most driving occurs close to home, the relaxation we feel caused by the repetition of driving through our own neighborhood likely plays a role.

If you've ever gotten home from work only to realize that your brain was on auto-pilot the whole drive, then you know this phenomenon. Driving in familiar places can cause us to rely more on muscle memory than on our active driving skills (making us less likely to be hyper-vigilant on the road).

The 2 most important things you can do to stay safe on a short neighborhood ride are the same things that will protect you on any ride: stay alert and buckle up. Seems like a no-brainer, but being active about these things really does make you a better, safer driver.

Try not to fall into a comfort zone when you're approaching your humble abode (or hilltop mansion). Even though you may know the route like the back of your hand, accidents are often caused by unpredictable elements like another driver, a crossing animal, or car equipment failure. And letting your guard down can decrease your responsiveness behind the wheel.

The stats also suggest the importance of buckling your seat belt even if you're just driving around the corner. A main reason drivers give for skipping on seat belts, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), is that they're only going a short distance. But buckling up, even close to home, is a habit worth getting into.

Lots of speculation and findings that seem to support what the researchers were looking for, funny how that works, but only one actual definitive statement.

Obviously there can be no definitive answer that satisfies everyone.  Not trying to derail this thread any further.  Saw DP, it was awesome.  Not the best movie i have ever seen, but it did what it wanted to do better than i had dared to hope.
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« Reply #55 on: February 21, 2016, 05:17:41 AM »

Quote from: TheEgoWhip on February 21, 2016, 03:15:37 AM

Quote from: Bullwinkle on February 20, 2016, 06:55:46 AM

Quote from: TheEgoWhip on February 19, 2016, 10:21:37 PM

Quote from: Bullwinkle on February 17, 2016, 08:39:23 PM



Did you know that most accidents happen within two miles of a person's home?  Do you know why that is?  It's because you've driven those roads so many times, you've gotten familiar with their patterns.  Blind to them, even.  So, when you come to a small intersection where there has never been another car coming another way in your entire life, but this one time there is, your muscles and mind are so used to just going anyway, that you do it.  Boom, you've had an accident.  Was it your fault?  Absolutely.  Is it understandable?  I think so.  But if there is someone else on the sidewalk seeing it happen, do you think they should speak up to keep it from happening?  Even though it won't be their responsibility either way?  Or would not doing that and calling the guy a bad driver be the better route?


Actually I'm pretty sure that the reason that most accidents occur within two miles of home is because every trip begins and ends there.  That means that the first two miles and last two miles of every trip falls into this statistic.  So every time you left your house you would have to travel a minimum of 4 miles from your home in a straight line in order to spend more than half your time beyond the 2 miles from home boundary.  If you counted up the time an average person spends in their car, the % that were within this two mile boundary will normally be well above 50%.

While that may be a factor, studies have shown otherwise.

Quote
"Our research suggests that many drivers appear to be in a comfort zone when driving close to home on familiar roads, hence why such a large proportion of accidents occur there," said Brian Martin, managing director of Elephant.co.uk.
"It's so important to keep a full level of concentration when driving, whether you're just popping to the shops or starting or ending a longer journey. These results emphasise this even more.
"It's interesting to note that the type of accidents people most commonly have close to home happen at lower speeds and involve less impact. In fact, these accidents could involve people simply manoeuvring in or out of their driveway.
"It's vital people stay alert and avoid complacency when driving close to home."

Quote
Progressive’s survey also shed some interesting light on other factors that may tend to lead toward the higher likelihood of auto accidents occurring close to home.  Progressive also surveyed seat belt usage close to home, driving distractions, and the frequency of driving errors that occur within a five mile radius of people’s homes.  The survey found that seat belt usage is much less frequent when driving closer to home than on longer commutes.

Also, people tend to talk on cell phones, listen to iPods, and eat while driving when closer to home as well.  A major cause of these increased driving distractions is that people tend to have a false sense of security when driving close to home, or in familiar areas, a factor that could lead to the high percentage of auto accidents close to home.

Car accident safety experts recommend that when driving close to home, you should not be fooled into having a false sense of security.  Drivers need to be twice as cautious when driving near home and be on the lookout for distracted and careless drivers.  Simply being aware of the fact that the likelihood of an auto accident increases dramatically the closer you are to home may save you from possibly becoming involved in a car accident.

Quote
driving close to home
You might think the drowsiness that accompanies a long road trip is more of a threat than cruising around your neighborhood. But car accidents often take place within  miles of home. While this is due to the fact that most driving occurs close to home, the relaxation we feel caused by the repetition of driving through our own neighborhood likely plays a role.

If you've ever gotten home from work only to realize that your brain was on auto-pilot the whole drive, then you know this phenomenon. Driving in familiar places can cause us to rely more on muscle memory than on our active driving skills (making us less likely to be hyper-vigilant on the road).

The 2 most important things you can do to stay safe on a short neighborhood ride are the same things that will protect you on any ride: stay alert and buckle up. Seems like a no-brainer, but being active about these things really does make you a better, safer driver.

Try not to fall into a comfort zone when you're approaching your humble abode (or hilltop mansion). Even though you may know the route like the back of your hand, accidents are often caused by unpredictable elements like another driver, a crossing animal, or car equipment failure. And letting your guard down can decrease your responsiveness behind the wheel.

The stats also suggest the importance of buckling your seat belt even if you're just driving around the corner. A main reason drivers give for skipping on seat belts, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), is that they're only going a short distance. But buckling up, even close to home, is a habit worth getting into.

Lots of speculation and findings that seem to support what the researchers were looking for, funny how that works, but only one actual definitive statement.

Obviously there can be no definitive answer that satisfies everyone.  Not trying to derail this thread any further.  Saw DP, it was awesome.  Not the best movie i have ever seen, but it did what it wanted to do better than i had dared to hope.

Jesus, it was an analogy. The facts barely matter, correct though they were. But your speculation is somehow different I suppose.
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« Reply #56 on: February 21, 2016, 02:41:21 PM »

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« Reply #57 on: February 21, 2016, 05:31:39 PM »

I keep trying, and they keep pulling me back in.


Anyhoo, there's a petition going around to get Deadpool to host SNL.

This is his response:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cFYDD7XqiIA
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« Reply #58 on: February 21, 2016, 11:42:29 PM »

Deadpool Sidekick Auditions on The Late Late Show with James Cordon and Ryan Reynolds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Udmek2zsURo
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« Reply #59 on: February 22, 2016, 04:42:03 PM »

Quote from: Suitably Ironic Moniker on February 21, 2016, 02:41:21 PM



I let it goat when I saw that Bullwinkle is like a pit bull with a bone in his mouth on this issue. No sense derailing any further.

Also, I still haven't seen Deadpool. I'm thinking about taking the kids, does anyone know if this is appropriate for a 6 year old?  icon_lol
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« Reply #60 on: February 22, 2016, 06:07:37 PM »

Quote from: Scraper on February 22, 2016, 04:42:03 PM

Quote from: Suitably Ironic Moniker on February 21, 2016, 02:41:21 PM



I let it goat when I saw that Bullwinkle is like a pit bull with a bone in his mouth on this issue. No sense derailing any further.

Also, I still haven't seen Deadpool. I'm thinking about taking the kids, does anyone know if this is appropriate for a 6 year old?  icon_lol
I would say 6 and 3/4 at least... then bring ear plugs and an eye mask...
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« Reply #61 on: February 22, 2016, 06:17:16 PM »

Straight from the kiddie hotline source: FWIW my 11yo nephew told me his friend and 7yo younger brother both saw it, and apparently told him there were only "2 inappropriate scenes for kids."  (I'm presuming it was the sex scene and titty bar.)  So he asked me if that was true, and I said "well I guess so if you think 90 minutes of bad language is appropriate" lol to which he frowned at me and left.

In spite of all the hubbub, I have to say this one is a hard one for me.  If your kid is used to hearing swear words and knows they are not supposed to use them (and you are OK with that), then what's left is the violence and sex.  I honestly didn't feel the violence was worse than tons of other stuff I've seen; even things on TV have been much worse IMHO because this was very comic book-like.  (For a real adult gross-out I recommend Hannibal.)  So all that leaves is a short sex scene and a titty bar, which theoretically you could cover their eyes.  And again it begs the question of what and why individuals as parents feel is inappropriate.  Dismemberment vs. nudity?  Discuss!
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« Reply #62 on: February 22, 2016, 08:40:22 PM »

I really think parents should just harden their younger children on a steady diet of the Faces of Death series in order to prepare them for prime time television later on in life.
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« Reply #63 on: February 29, 2016, 04:57:41 AM »

Quote from: hepcat on February 22, 2016, 08:40:22 PM

I really think parents should just harden their younger children on a steady diet of the Faces of Death series in order to prepare them for prime time television later on in life.
I think I was 10 the first time I watched those movies and 9 when I watched Aliens in the theater.  I would not blanket recommend either for any child.  I had already been to a funeral for a kid who was killed, so my parents and grandmother figured I already understood enough by then. 

I enjoyed this movie a lot, but it will be a while before my kids watch it.
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