http://gamingtrend.com
September 18, 2014, 09:48:39 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Has Art regressed?  (Read 3533 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Kev199
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 255


View Profile
« on: August 08, 2008, 10:25:36 PM »

Ok, I am sure some folks out there go to Art museums every once in a while or maybe there are a few art history majors out there.  I was roaming the Metropolitan Museum of Art a few days ago and I kind of noticed a trend.  Art seems to have regressed from something of beauty and grandeur to something as simple as a portrait of nothing but blue or red or maybe a single white stripe.  Now, cavemen have put together more thought provoking art collections on walls with animal blood.  I understand modern art as much as I can, but I guess I am criticizing it.  I feel like I'm walking through time and seeing art slowly devolve.  I am disappointed a bit.  I took a few art history classes in undergrad, but I didn't really feel the connection until I walked from the modern art area to the Roman sculpture hall.  However, I know in many places artists are creating original and beautiful works, but they don't seem to be worthy of the museums.  Maybe in 30 years I'll walk through the MET again and change my opinion, but at this moment, the "post-modern" and modern art seems a bit lacking.  However I have seen art take new forms, like film and gaming, which might explain why the art on the canvas has become so simple.

Any thoughts?
« Last Edit: August 08, 2008, 10:50:45 PM by Kev199 » Logged
helot2000
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 287


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2008, 10:38:36 PM »

Years ago, I  took my kids (then age 5 and 6) to the Minneapolis Institute of Art for the first time.  We greatly enjoyed all of the displays and eras until we came to the Modern Art on the first floor.  My son looked at a huge white canvas with a few squiggles of black on it and said "Dad, even I could do that."  We zoomed through the modern section as it seems like a scam to our untrained eyes.   

Four years ago I was lucky enough to see the traveling exhibit "Crossing the Channel"-a fabulous collection of French and British masterpieces of the Romantic period and it blew me away. I actually got goosebumps looking at some of the pieces.  In my opinion, yes, art has regressed. 

« Last Edit: August 12, 2008, 05:48:14 PM by helot2000 » Logged

Saving the world one post at a time.
Arowyn
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 40


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2008, 10:59:05 PM »

No, art hasn't regressed, as that would mean that it went backward or returned to a previous state.  Art has moved forward, and not always in ways that many of us appreciate.  But remember that the impressionists that many of us love so much were scorned and ridiculed in their day.  Art reflects the society that inspires it, for good or ill.  And yes, we have many new art forms, some of them beautiful and inspiring, some hideous and thought provoking, some mundane.  But art moves forward, as does time. 
Logged
Biyobi
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 718


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2008, 11:18:27 PM »

I agree that art hasn't regressed but modern paintings don't seem to do much for me.  I'm with helot's opinion in the feeling that a lot of these works seem like a scam.  I am a big fan of some of the sculpture work that has come along though.
Logged
The Grue
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 8186


You are likely to be eaten by a grue.


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2008, 12:01:16 AM »

Quote from: helot2000 on August 08, 2008, 10:38:36 PM

My son looked at a huge white canvas with a few squiggles of black on it and said "Dad, even I could do that." 

Yes, but your son didn't.  We look at it afterwards and it seems so simple, but the creation of it wasn't and there is a message behind it.
Logged

XBox Live ID: The Grue
Playstation Network Name: TheGrue
Laner
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 4693


Badassfully


View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: August 09, 2008, 12:22:39 AM »

Quote from: The Grue on August 09, 2008, 12:01:16 AM

We look at it afterwards and it seems so simple, but the creation of it wasn't and there is a message behind it.
Says who?  Anyone can draw a few lines and say how it symbolizes some ridiculous philosophical nonsense.
Logged
Biyobi
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 718


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: August 09, 2008, 12:23:11 AM »

Quote from: The Grue on August 09, 2008, 12:01:16 AM

Quote from: helot2000 on August 08, 2008, 10:38:36 PM

My son looked at a huge white canvas with a few squiggles of black on it and said "Dad, even I could do that." 

Yes, but your son didn't.  We look at it afterwards and it seems so simple, but the creation of it wasn't and there is a message behind it.

The "message behind it" could be that the son doesn't have the sales skills to convince someone that his "Doodles on a Sketchpad" collection is worth money.  Maybe if he put on a beret and complained tragically of a lack of inspiration his "Hashmarks on a Field of White" will sell to a pretentious someone that appreciates the difficult creation process.  The rest of us will look at it and see graph paper, and think "WTF".
Logged
The Grue
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 8186


You are likely to be eaten by a grue.


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2008, 12:30:42 AM »

Quote from: Laner on August 09, 2008, 12:22:39 AM

Quote from: The Grue on August 09, 2008, 12:01:16 AM

We look at it afterwards and it seems so simple, but the creation of it wasn't and there is a message behind it.
Says who?  Anyone can draw a few lines and say how it symbolizes some ridiculous philosophical nonsense.

You are assuming art is all about technical skill.  It isn't.  Art is about using a particular medium to express emtions, concepts, etc.  It doesn't have to be the Mona Lisa to do that.  I'll take the modern art over portrait art any day, but even portrait art is still art.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2008, 12:32:28 AM by The Grue » Logged

XBox Live ID: The Grue
Playstation Network Name: TheGrue
The Grue
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 8186


You are likely to be eaten by a grue.


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2008, 12:33:04 AM »

Quote from: Biyobi on August 09, 2008, 12:23:11 AM

Quote from: The Grue on August 09, 2008, 12:01:16 AM

Quote from: helot2000 on August 08, 2008, 10:38:36 PM

My son looked at a huge white canvas with a few squiggles of black on it and said "Dad, even I could do that." 

Yes, but your son didn't.  We look at it afterwards and it seems so simple, but the creation of it wasn't and there is a message behind it.

The "message behind it" could be that the son doesn't have the sales skills to convince someone that his "Doodles on a Sketchpad" collection is worth money.  Maybe if he put on a beret and complained tragically of a lack of inspiration his "Hashmarks on a Field of White" will sell to a pretentious someone that appreciates the difficult creation process.  The rest of us will look at it and see graph paper, and think "WTF".

And maybe you're just being a dick now.  And I mean this in the nicest possible way.

Actually, let's not just leave it there.  Let me try to put this concept into another art form....music.  Let's try something like Punk.  People could sit there and argue that Punk music is just people string 3 chords together and convincing someone that it represents pent up anger about our bullshit capitalist society and how "The Man" is keeping us down.  The fact that it was just 3 chords doesn't make it any less artistic than Mozart's "Queen of the Night."  It is still art in that, to some, they get the whole "pent up anger" thing and it meant something to them.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2008, 12:37:50 AM by The Grue » Logged

XBox Live ID: The Grue
Playstation Network Name: TheGrue
Kev199
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 255


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: August 09, 2008, 12:48:37 AM »

One painting was a canvas painted completely white.  Another, by a different artist, was painted completely black.  They were "untitled" works.  I was stunned people were taking pictures.  Honestly, someone explain to me the message behind that art?  A lack of creativity or the perfection of marketing?
Logged
Fellow
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 1176


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: August 09, 2008, 02:08:12 AM »

Postmodernism at work, more or less. I think a lot of the headscratchers these days have more to do with trying to garner some kind of a cognitive response from the viewer, than to "paint a pretty picture".

A simple example would be the white canvas you mentioned, for instance. You looked at it, and you immediately began to wonder what the deal was. Right there and then it made you think. Question. Challenge. It caused an emotional reaction in you (doesn't matter, if it was negative), etc. etc. Who knows? That may have been the artist's intent.

Having said the above, I feel a little dirty defending it, because while I can appreciate the conceptual thinking behind the stuff, I'm still not a big fan. There are definitely some wonderful examples of postmodern stuff that tickle the mind, but unfortunately there's an abundance of dreck as well. And remember just because it's called art, doesn't mean it's also not crap (in some cases, literally).

Ultimately, though, it's up to you to decide, which is the beauty of it. And like The Grue said, different strokes for different folks.
Logged

X360 Gamertag: LuckyFellow
PS3: Fellow
Nintendo Wii: 2484 8443 5009 9425
EngineNo9
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 11061


I said good day, sir!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #11 on: August 09, 2008, 02:10:01 AM »

Quote from: The Grue on August 09, 2008, 12:33:04 AM

Quote from: Biyobi on August 09, 2008, 12:23:11 AM

Quote from: The Grue on August 09, 2008, 12:01:16 AM

Quote from: helot2000 on August 08, 2008, 10:38:36 PM

My son looked at a huge white canvas with a few squiggles of black on it and said "Dad, even I could do that." 

Yes, but your son didn't.  We look at it afterwards and it seems so simple, but the creation of it wasn't and there is a message behind it.

The "message behind it" could be that the son doesn't have the sales skills to convince someone that his "Doodles on a Sketchpad" collection is worth money.  Maybe if he put on a beret and complained tragically of a lack of inspiration his "Hashmarks on a Field of White" will sell to a pretentious someone that appreciates the difficult creation process.  The rest of us will look at it and see graph paper, and think "WTF".

And maybe you're just being a dick now.  And I mean this in the nicest possible way.

Actually, let's not just leave it there.  Let me try to put this concept into another art form....music.  Let's try something like Punk.  People could sit there and argue that Punk music is just people string 3 chords together and convincing someone that it represents pent up anger about our bullshit capitalist society and how "The Man" is keeping us down.  The fact that it was just 3 chords doesn't make it any less artistic than Mozart's "Queen of the Night."  It is still art in that, to some, they get the whole "pent up anger" thing and it meant something to them.

If it was a 2 second song with 3 notes and some dude yelling "Crap!" then I would agree with your comparison.  
Logged

Sandwiches do fix everything.
Andrew Mallon
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 1900


View Profile
« Reply #12 on: August 09, 2008, 02:18:32 AM »

Quote from: Fellow on August 09, 2008, 02:08:12 AM

A simple example would be the white canvas you mentioned, for instance. You looked at it, and you immediately began to wonder what the deal was. Right there and then it made you think. Question. Challenge. It caused an emotional reaction in you (doesn't matter, if it was negative), etc. etc. Who knows? That may have been the artist's intent.

This is silly. I can provoke an emotional reaction by running up to a random stranger and calling him or her an asshole. It doesn't make it art. Or, at the very least, it doesn't make it very good art.
Logged
CSL
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 1356


View Profile
« Reply #13 on: August 09, 2008, 03:36:14 AM »

Modern art is crap. There, I said it.

The worst part of the Tate and the National Gallery was always Modern Art.
Logged
Fellow
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 1176


View Profile
« Reply #14 on: August 09, 2008, 03:39:20 AM »

Quote from: Andrew Mallon on August 09, 2008, 02:18:32 AM

This is silly. I can provoke an emotional reaction by running up to a random stranger and calling him or her an asshole. It doesn't make it art. Or, at the very least, it doesn't make it very good art.

Heh, sure. Have a buddy film every time you call a random stranger an asshole, put up an exhibit of the various tapes looping on a wall, name it the human conditioning, and voila... art!

I think the big problem these days is that the basic definition of art(which back in the day was the result of some fella painting and sculpting really really well) has changed to something that's very hard to define outright. A huge part of postmodernism is to challenge everything, so of course you're going to have a large group of people reeeallly stretching the limits of what's considered as art and what's not.

Hell, this topic in itself is something people a lot smarter than us are still arguing about to this very date. I myself have no qualms about admitting that there's A LOT of stuff today that I don't get, and which makes me shake my head in disbelief. I still prefer a well painted portrait or a landscape more than an otherwise white canvas with a small red square in it, but at the same time I do acknowledge both of them as being art.
Logged

X360 Gamertag: LuckyFellow
PS3: Fellow
Nintendo Wii: 2484 8443 5009 9425
Turtle
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 9364



View Profile WWW
« Reply #15 on: August 09, 2008, 05:10:23 AM »

Same here, as an artist myself, I do consider many, many things as art.  But, I don't consider a lot of modern art out there to be worth the crap it's created with.

Sometimes I get really annoying at how much I have to struggle to become a professional draftsman and animator and yet some people make thousands putting crap on crap.

On the other hand, some really good artists have been making a good living selling small paintings on ebay these days, which is what I'll be doing.
Logged
Sarkus
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2593


View Profile
« Reply #16 on: August 09, 2008, 06:03:18 AM »

I think we need to seperate Art from the Business of Art when talking about modern art.  We associate art with its monetary value.  In the long-term, this value is accurate.   In the short-term, this value is not accurate.  So, something that is "modern art" that has a high monetary value on par with something much older is not really the same thing.  We won't know until decades from now how or what "modern art" will be considered great, but we do know what older art has stood the test of time and currently has value.

 

Logged

Roger: And you should know, I have no genitals.
Syndey: That's alright.  I have both.

- American Dad
Turtle
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 9364



View Profile WWW
« Reply #17 on: August 09, 2008, 07:29:21 AM »

Heh, I wasn't even talking about monetary value either.  A lot of the modern art I've seen isn't valuable monetarily or for their ideas.
Logged
warning
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 7325



View Profile
« Reply #18 on: August 09, 2008, 03:19:55 PM »

I like how Art is capitalized.  It makes it seem grander somehow.

How about we just call it "art" and take it at face value.  People have made the same arguments about music (that it has regressed) ever since Elvis.  You listen to Mozart and Nine Inch Nails side by side and there's no question things have changed.  Visual art is really no different.

I'd take a piece of graph paper over Thomas Kinkade any day.
Logged
Sparhawk
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 1834



View Profile
« Reply #19 on: August 09, 2008, 03:38:49 PM »

http://www.conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=126395

http://www.conceptart.org/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=46

I don't think art has gone anywhere. The style of modern art is not the only art still around. Don't fret...
Logged

PSN: Kal_Torok
Xbox Live: Sparhawk GT
noun
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 253


View Profile
« Reply #20 on: August 09, 2008, 03:47:37 PM »

My criteria: if I can personally duplicate it, it's bullshit, not art. I can't copy another artist's painting or sculpture, but I can glue a bunch of crap together or take a photo of my foot.
Logged
kathode
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2469



View Profile
« Reply #21 on: August 09, 2008, 04:09:35 PM »

The Hirschhorn Modern Art Museum in DC is usually a lot of fun.  I think it mainly depends on the artist and curator.  You don't go to a big summer music festival and expect to like every band do you?  I'm not a fan of the Rothko-style simplicity myself, but there are a lot of current artists I like.  I made a trip to NYC last April just to see the Cai-Guo Qiang exhibit at the Guggenheim before it left.  I thought it was mind-blowing.  I think you just have to figure out what you like and zero in on stuff like that, like you would with music or cinema or even games.  
Logged
Ironrod
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3391



View Profile WWW
« Reply #22 on: August 09, 2008, 09:11:50 PM »

Quote from: Arowyn on August 08, 2008, 10:59:05 PM

No, art hasn't regressed, as that would mean that it went backward or returned to a previous state.  Art has moved forward, and not always in ways that many of us appreciate.  But remember that the impressionists that many of us love so much were scorned and ridiculed in their day.  Art reflects the society that inspires it, for good or ill.  And yes, we have many new art forms, some of them beautiful and inspiring, some hideous and thought provoking, some mundane.  But art moves forward, as does time. 

I would add that to understand any art school or movement, you have to know the context of what came before it, as well as what was going on in the world at large. Every stylistic change is either an evolution of what came before, or a reaction to it, or it reflects something that was going on in the world outside of art. You still won't  enjoy or appreciate every new twist, but at least you can understand why it happened and what it means.

Boston's Museum of Fine Arts is arranged more-or-less chronologically. If you have time and patience, you can follow the whole progression of art from Egyptian friezes to modernist paintings, and even a bit beyond (although they don't really get into contemporary art)...and it makes sense.
Logged

Curio City Online - Weird stuff you can buy
Curious Business - The Curio City Blog
helot2000
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 287


View Profile
« Reply #23 on: August 10, 2008, 03:56:39 AM »

Quote from: Arowyn on August 08, 2008, 10:59:05 PM

But remember that the impressionists that many of us love so much were scorned and ridiculed in their day.  Art reflects the society that inspires it, for good or ill.  And yes, we have many new art forms, some of them beautiful and inspiring, some hideous and thought provoking, some mundane.  But art moves forward, as does time. 
I recognize this and I greatly enjoyed a book on the subject, The Judgment of Paris: The Revolutionary Decade That Gave the World Impressionism. The difference would be that Impressionism won acceptance in a very short period of time...in 1863 the impressionists were relegated to the Salon des RefusÚs and then ten years later was the first Impressionist exhibit.  How long have we had modern art?

I don't know if I will ever be able to shake the fact that what passes for modern art has more to do with the sig on the corner than what is on the canvas.  When Yoko Ono puts an apple under glass and names the exhibit "Apple under Glass," that's modern art.  Now put that up against the larger than life "The Execution of Lady James Grey."  I know, all art is not created equal.  One moves me and the other just feels like a sham.  I will concede that like almost everything else in life, it is personal taste.  And that I am biased by an opinion expressed by others that if anyone can do it, copy it or mimic it, I'm not impressed. 
Logged

Saving the world one post at a time.
Arowyn
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 40


View Profile
« Reply #24 on: August 10, 2008, 04:49:37 AM »

I blame Marcel Duchamp. nod
Logged
Sparhawk
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 1834



View Profile
« Reply #25 on: August 10, 2008, 05:12:08 AM »







Did any of you actually visit the links I provided?

Just because someone is a modern artist doesn't mean they can't paint in the classical style.

Logged

PSN: Kal_Torok
Xbox Live: Sparhawk GT
Fellow
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 1176


View Profile
« Reply #26 on: August 10, 2008, 12:52:10 PM »

I actually did, and found them to be absolutely stunning.
Logged

X360 Gamertag: LuckyFellow
PS3: Fellow
Nintendo Wii: 2484 8443 5009 9425
Ironrod
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3391



View Profile WWW
« Reply #27 on: August 10, 2008, 05:11:53 PM »

Once a year I visit the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (MassMoCA). It's not a collecting museum. Everything there is just passing through. Over the past 10 years I have seen some memorable and provocative installations, a few really offensive or disturbing pieces, and a whole lot of forgettable and forgotten efforts. I always enjoy the visit, though. Contemporary art resists the Yoko Ono effect that helot2000 mentioned. It is more about emerging talent and experimentation than star power. 
 
Logged

Curio City Online - Weird stuff you can buy
Curious Business - The Curio City Blog
LordMortis
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 370


View Profile
« Reply #28 on: August 11, 2008, 12:53:46 PM »

It all depends on what you expect from the source, I guess.

I don't get modern art or post modernism or whatever you want to call it but I am often fascinated by it.  I love reading long explanations about what looks like ping pong table mounted on a wall.  I love finding out about authorial presence and texture of medium and rebellion against intentionality and how the war reduced us to a pursuit of absurdity or meaninglessness or whatever.

But when I look, I still see what looks like ping pong table mounted on a wall or a pile of telephones or paint splattered on a wall.

Sometimes I apprecitate technique.  Sometimes I appreciate "getting it."  Sometimes I appreciate the pursuit of getting it.   Sometimes I apprecitate effort.  Sometimes effortlessness. 

At the same time, I like the irony.  You call the MET's acceptance of art acting and reacting, necessarily going forward regression because you long for how you saw how things used to be.

I'm a fickle bitch and I like what I like.  Museums generally don't do much for me because they always seem to divorce work from its context, so the works feel like watching caged animals.  Although every museum seems to have something that grabs me.  Being a proper child of my generation, it's usually some of the impressionists or surrealists.  Some of those people, who in their way regressed from real.  From talent for concrete presentation as we would think of it to give us something else.  And that something can totally put me under a spell.
Logged
hepcat
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 9233


I'M the one that knocks! Now...burp me!


View Profile
« Reply #29 on: August 11, 2008, 01:48:47 PM »

All art is subjective.  To argue its merits is a fool's errand. 
Logged

Warning:  You will see my penis. -Brian

Just remember: once a user figures out gluten noting them they're allowed to make fun of you. - Ceekay speaking in tongues.
Hemlock Bones
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 38


View Profile
« Reply #30 on: August 11, 2008, 04:14:07 PM »

If it must be defended... it's not art.
Logged
hepcat
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 9233


I'M the one that knocks! Now...burp me!


View Profile
« Reply #31 on: August 11, 2008, 04:23:11 PM »

Quote from: Hemlock Bones on August 11, 2008, 04:14:07 PM

If it must be defended... it's not art.

all art has had to be defended from at least one critic at one point...ergo, art does not exist. 

WE ARE LIVING IN AN ARTLESS WORLD!

(except for that "dogs playing poker" painting...that thing just takes the imagination to new realms)
Logged

Warning:  You will see my penis. -Brian

Just remember: once a user figures out gluten noting them they're allowed to make fun of you. - Ceekay speaking in tongues.
Kev199
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 255


View Profile
« Reply #32 on: August 11, 2008, 05:44:10 PM »

If no one defends it, then it is not art...



Anyways, I think art has regressed.  It is still art, but at a lower level of complexity and beauty.
Logged
hepcat
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 9233


I'M the one that knocks! Now...burp me!


View Profile
« Reply #33 on: August 11, 2008, 06:03:15 PM »

I think we're exposed to so many mediums and so many styles at this point that it's easy to dismiss all modern art with an exasperated shrug.  However, it doesn't mean that art itself has degenerated.  It just means we have more to search through in order to find what appeals to us as individuals.  I, for one, enjoy having the option to decide what catches my fancy.
Logged

Warning:  You will see my penis. -Brian

Just remember: once a user figures out gluten noting them they're allowed to make fun of you. - Ceekay speaking in tongues.
th'FOOL
Executive Producer and Editor-At-Large
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 5012


Never whistle while you're pissing


View Profile WWW
« Reply #34 on: August 11, 2008, 06:05:38 PM »

This is a question that really hits home for me as my wife is a struggling painter.  

Put simply, her work is AMAZING.  And that isn't bias speaking:






Her current situation is this:  The actual artists of Houston recognize her as the best in town- she is an artist's artist.  Most galleries don't even want to show local work, and those that do are really low-rent or just want to show abstract (BAD abstract).  She had a solo show last october that was the most publicized and talked about show the gallery she had it at ever had, yet inexplicably, the gallery owner thought it would be nice to get wasted at her opening and proceed to scare off any potential buyers, completely dissing her work aloud in the process.  I almost beat him to a fucking pulp....

Needless to say, the experience has left her disillusioned and she is only just now getting the urge to do new art.  meanwhile, I have a house that is crowded with paintings that she won't even let me talk her into shopping around outside of Houston as they "aren't good enough"....

So, yeah.  It pisses me off when bird-vomit paintings sell all the time but my wife can't sell one to save her life no matter how hard she tries.

Logged

Mike Dunn
Executive Producer & Managing Editor, GamingTrend
hepcat
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 9233


I'M the one that knocks! Now...burp me!


View Profile
« Reply #35 on: August 11, 2008, 06:10:44 PM »

Quote from: th'FOOL on August 11, 2008, 06:05:38 PM


Put simply, her work is AMAZING.  And that isn't bias speaking:




not trying to be rude, but in this you can't help but be biased.  icon_wink

Logged

Warning:  You will see my penis. -Brian

Just remember: once a user figures out gluten noting them they're allowed to make fun of you. - Ceekay speaking in tongues.
The Grue
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 8186


You are likely to be eaten by a grue.


View Profile
« Reply #36 on: August 11, 2008, 06:12:02 PM »

Now, see, this is why art is subjective.  While I think the paintings are nice, they aren't something I would want hanging in my house as the subject matter doesn't appeal to me.  Yet, some of the modern art that is just bare bones from a technical standpoint, but carries a message, would immediately go up.  
Logged

XBox Live ID: The Grue
Playstation Network Name: TheGrue
th'FOOL
Executive Producer and Editor-At-Large
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 5012


Never whistle while you're pissing


View Profile WWW
« Reply #37 on: August 11, 2008, 06:18:39 PM »

Quote from: hepcat on August 11, 2008, 06:10:44 PM

Quote from: th'FOOL on August 11, 2008, 06:05:38 PM


Put simply, her work is AMAZING.  And that isn't bias speaking:




not trying to be rude, but in this you can't help but be biased.  icon_wink



sorry.  meant to say "isn't JUST bias speaking...."
Logged

Mike Dunn
Executive Producer & Managing Editor, GamingTrend
hepcat
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 9233


I'M the one that knocks! Now...burp me!


View Profile
« Reply #38 on: August 11, 2008, 06:18:53 PM »

Years ago I briefly dated a woman who was convinced she was a great artist.  She quit her day job to paint and to work in a gallery.  I never had the heart to tell her that her "Me As A Young Girl" painting was the single creepiest thing I'd ever seen.  It was like a set piece for a Texas Chainsaw Massacre movie.  I had to endure looking at the thing for the few months we were together and I swear it scarred me both emotionally and mentally.  

Somehow she was able to eventually get a small gallery show.  From what I heard from friends, it was primarily due to the unsettling nature of her work.  To each their own, I guess.  As I said, art is truly subjective.

Quote
I blame Marcel Duchamp.

I actually consider learning about the 1919 Paris Armory show to be one of the highlights of my brief tenure as an art major in college (I eventually dropped it to a minor and then dropped it altogether when I couldn't shade that goddamn tennis ball in Intro to Drawing).  Introduced me to the full effect of Dadaism and "Found Art".

The general feel I'm getting from some of the posts in this thread is that some folks only like "photo realism" in their art.   icon_wink
« Last Edit: August 11, 2008, 06:28:44 PM by hepcat » Logged

Warning:  You will see my penis. -Brian

Just remember: once a user figures out gluten noting them they're allowed to make fun of you. - Ceekay speaking in tongues.
Purge
Gaming Trend Staff
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 18537



View Profile WWW
« Reply #39 on: August 11, 2008, 08:02:34 PM »

Quote from: kathode on August 09, 2008, 04:09:35 PM

I think you just have to figure out what you like and zero in on stuff like that, like you would with music or cinema or even games.  

I think what bothers me about art is this: there are those who would tell you that you're less-than simply because you don't "get" it; they themselves don't "have" it, they simply gravitate to a BS piece and give it false depth.
Logged

"If it weren't for Philo T. Farnsworth, inventor of television, we'd still be eating frozen radio dinners." - Johnny Carson
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.174 seconds with 103 queries. (Pretty URLs adds 0.055s, 2q)