http://gamingtrend.com
May 28, 2015, 01:13:33 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: "Best" of CES 2015  (Read 672 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
rittchard
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 4257


View Profile
« on: January 07, 2015, 09:35:36 PM »

http://www.engadget.com/2015/01/07/introducing-the-best-of-ces-2015-finalists/

Now I have a pretty open mind when it comes to electronics, and I'm as much of a gadget freak/early adopter as the next guy (probably more so), but there are some trends I just don't get:

Curved TVs:  I checked them out recently and while the picture looked fantastic when you are facing it dead on, it was just terrible from the sides, the curve was beyond just a distraction, it made me feel like part of the picture was missing

Curved phones: what need does this serve at all?  Seems like it would just be more difficult to store and protect, and visually I thought the whole idea was to be able to give a more "widescreen" feel, but that would only be in larger screen TVs

Thinner TVs:  OK this is kind of cool from a technology standpoint, and I can certainly see the benefit if you are going wall mount or want to hide the TV.  But in the case of the new Sony, it's a bit perplexing.  They've made it super thin, but the support pieces look the same, so you still need the same footprint if you aren't doing a wall mount.  Ultimately, though, I am not moving it around or looking at the sides of the TV, so what do I care if it's thin or not lol?  And again, if I don't wall mount I don't even save any space.

Web-based kitchenware stuff:  this wasn't in the CES 2015 best of article, but I keep hearing about more and more "connected" kitchen items.  I keep trying to figure how this would be useful but I keep coming up empty

All in all I didn't see anything that jumped out at me, YMMV...
Logged
YellowKing
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3327



View Profile
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2015, 01:21:50 AM »

I agree on the curved TVs. I went to Best Buy and looked at a 78-inch curved one and dead center I could see the appeal since it made the picture slightly more immersive, but from the sides I didn't find it particularly better than viewing any decent flat-screen TV at an angle. And it would look utterly ridiculous wall-mounted.

I think this is a case of manufacturers doing it because they stumbled upon some tech that looks cool, not something that actually fulfills any consumer need.

I don't mind the thinner TVs - thinner = lighter, and all that eventually trickles down to lower cost. Less materials, costs less to ship, etc.

Honestly most of this CES seemed more about stuff that I think is still a few years away from being ready for prime time. VR, self-driving cars, smart watches? I think those are all a ways off from mainstream adoption.
Logged
wonderpug
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 11716


hmm...


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2015, 02:34:59 AM »

I didn't see much in that article to get excited about, but I do love that we live in an age where "best robot or drone" is a valid category.
Logged
Lee
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3801


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2015, 02:38:08 AM »

I think a computer monitor might be cool since viewing angles aren't usually an issue. Still I am not sure if there is a really a point. Like YK said, it seems they are just doing it because they can. All these manufacturers are desperately looking for anything to stand out, and this is their latest attempt.

Logged
Ironrod
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3491



View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2015, 03:00:16 AM »

Maybe the "Internet of Things" really is the Next Big Thing, but it strikes me as a solution in search of a problem. I'd worry about my toaster and my refrigerator conspiring against me. Maybe I'd let my guard down if they went back to calling it the "smart house."
Logged

Curio City Online - Weird stuff you can buy
Curious Business - The Curio City Blog
Lee
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3801


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2015, 04:01:32 AM »

Quote from: Ironrod on January 08, 2015, 03:00:16 AM

Maybe the "Internet of Things" really is the Next Big Thing, but it strikes me as a solution in search of a problem. I'd worry about my toaster and my refrigerator conspiring against me. Maybe I'd let my guard down if they went back to calling it the "smart house."

I love the whole Internet of Things idea. I need my phone to turn on most of my lights or to play music, but that really isn't an issue since I always have my phone close. If I didn't live an apartment I would get a Nest in a second. Not sure I need anything connected in my kitchen though, I can't think of any uses. Like the wifi crockpot, a device that has two or three settings and it's something I need to prepare and monitor myself, so why do I need it online?

I was looking at electric toothbrushes they other day. There is a bluetooth one that you use your phone with. Seems completely pointless. Some of this stuff is really a fad.
Logged
naednek
Global Moderator
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 4886



View Profile
« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2015, 05:06:03 AM »

I think the point of the curved tv is for those who are not sitting dead center would get the same effect.  My experience from looking at one at costco was there was a huge glare on the sides.
Logged
EngineNo9
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 11602


I said good day, sir!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2015, 05:10:20 AM »

Quote from: Lee on January 08, 2015, 02:38:08 AM

I think a computer monitor might be cool since viewing angles aren't usually an issue. Still I am not sure if there is a really a point. Like YK said, it seems they are just doing it because they can. All these manufacturers are desperately looking for anything to stand out, and this is their latest attempt.

Yeah, I think a computer might be the best place for a curved display.  You're generally only using it with one person and they sit in pretty much the same place all the time, so you don't have the off-angle problems of curved TVs.  

Also, did you see this video from Vizio?  I laughed.  smile
Logged
YellowKing
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3327



View Profile
« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2015, 04:52:01 PM »

I think the "Internet of Things" thing is a really necessary infrastructure and could pay huge dividends down the road that we can't even fathom right now. The problem is that as consumers it understandably feels very gimmicky because the actual important use cases can't come about until it's a standard. I believe this is one of the rare instances in which the technology needs to be forced on consumers. Standard API that is just built into everything whether you utilize it or not. Once it's out there, application developers can start making feature sets for it.

This isn't about your toaster oven telling you the weather. This is about making electronics speak a common language so that our environment can work as a cohesive system rather than a bunch of disparate units.
Logged
wonderpug
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 11716


hmm...


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: January 08, 2015, 05:00:07 PM »

Quote from: YellowKing on January 08, 2015, 04:52:01 PM

This isn't about your toaster oven telling you the weather. This is about making electronics speak a common language so that they collectively become self-aware and take over the world.

 
Logged
YellowKing
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3327



View Profile
« Reply #10 on: January 08, 2015, 06:03:39 PM »

I, for one, welcome our new Terminator overlords.  icon_smile
Logged
rittchard
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 4257


View Profile
« Reply #11 on: January 09, 2015, 12:42:58 AM »

Here's some stuff about curved TV viewing:

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2014/01/whats-the-deal-with-curved-tvs/

It still seems like it would only be effective on a really huge (theater-like) scale, or, as mentioned, for a single person's personal space.  As the main TV servicing a general family room, it seems like it would be more detrimental since anyone stuck on the sides gets a more distorted view.

Given that, it really makes me wonder what the use case is for a curved phone?   saywhat

- - -

I love the line about the toaster and fridge conspiring lol.  While I am intrigued by the concept of appliances and other items having a common API/language, I'm still wondering where the benefit lies.  So let's just imagine in the extreme, every single thing in your kitchen is capable of communicating on a common platform with each other and thus with your phone/watch.  That's still not going to allow the dishes to wash themselves or the food to cook itself.  Maybe if you added robots into the mix?  I guess we're really getting into Terminator territory then lol.

Other smart home items I can see some benefits in, and as mentioned in the Echo thread, I can imagine a common interface binding them all together - the Nest, door locks, home security, lighting, TV, etc.  A futuristic home where most common things are voice or watch/phone commanded via a seamless wireless interface.  Maybe it's just the kitchen stuff that's bugging me.

Logged
Lee
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3801


View Profile
« Reply #12 on: January 09, 2015, 12:57:08 AM »

Quote from: rittchard on January 09, 2015, 12:42:58 AM

Other smart home items I can see some benefits in, and as mentioned in the Echo thread, I can imagine a common interface binding them all together - the Nest, door locks, home security, lighting, TV, etc.  A futuristic home where most common things are voice or watch/phone commanded via a seamless wireless interface. 

Apple is trying that with Homekit, which should be out this year. I believe Google has their own version centered around Nest as well. WeMO is extending their stuff too. It's coming, but unfortunately there won't be one standard.
Logged
wonderpug
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 11716


hmm...


View Profile
« Reply #13 on: January 09, 2015, 02:34:46 AM »

Have any tv companies hinted at developing flexible TVs?  Flat for everyday use, curved as much or as little as you want when one or two are watching?
Logged
Ironrod
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3491



View Profile WWW
« Reply #14 on: January 09, 2015, 03:18:40 AM »

Quote from: YellowKing on January 08, 2015, 04:52:01 PM

I believe this is one of the rare instances in which the technology needs to be forced on consumers.

So if I'm forced to adopt the solution, the problem will follow? Got it.

As soon as the things get the internet they'll want social networks. Where do I invest in Thingbook?
Logged

Curio City Online - Weird stuff you can buy
Curious Business - The Curio City Blog
EngineNo9
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 11602


I said good day, sir!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #15 on: January 09, 2015, 05:19:27 AM »

Quote from: rittchard on January 09, 2015, 12:42:58 AM

Given that, it really makes me wonder what the use case is for a curved phone?   saywhat

I had a Samsung/Google Nexus S phone that was the very first curved phone a few years ago.  After being taken apart by tech sites it was apparently just curved glass and not curved screen, but same idea. 

It was actually a nice little curve that made the phone fit on your face slightly more comfortably than a square brick.  You know, for when you use it as a phone.  Subtle, but it was nice.  But certainly not a feature I even considered when buying that phone, or one I'd care about now.
Logged
YellowKing
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3327



View Profile
« Reply #16 on: January 09, 2015, 02:51:05 PM »

Quote from: Ironrod
So if I'm forced to adopt the solution, the problem will follow? Got it.

Well in theory, you're not actually being forced to do anything or use anything in a different way. The only difference would be that the electronics in your refrigerator you never notice would run on a standard platform instead of on Java or whatever. It's not like you're going to stop buying appliances with electronics, since all of them have it anyway. The internals would just be on a standard.

Quote
Other smart home items I can see some benefits in, and as mentioned in the Echo thread, I can imagine a common interface binding them all together - the Nest, door locks, home security, lighting, TV, etc.  A futuristic home where most common things are voice or watch/phone commanded via a seamless wireless interface.  Maybe it's just the kitchen stuff that's bugging me.

I think the use cases are definitely more useful for the stuff you described (lighting, security, etc.) but there are some good appliance uses as well. Health monitoring, for instance. Your dryer could send you a text and tell you the heating element is starting to go out. Or your fridge could alert you when it's time for a new water filter.

I also see the potential to make very smart "green" appliances that could regulate their power consumption based on certain conditions. Maybe your washer can sense the load and use the precise amount of water and power to use to wash it, then communicate that information to the dryer.

If every appliance is aware of its environment and has the ability to communicate, then every appliance could be a smoke alarm or carbon monoxide detector. We'd move away from the concept of a house full of disparate machines, and into the concept of a house being an integrated, self-aware ecosystem.
« Last Edit: January 09, 2015, 02:57:53 PM by YellowKing » Logged
Isgrimnur
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 9066



View Profile
« Reply #17 on: January 09, 2015, 03:35:13 PM »

Quote from: YellowKing on January 09, 2015, 02:51:05 PM

I also see the potential to make very smart "green" appliances that could regulate their power consumption based on certain conditions. Maybe your washer can sense the load and use the precise amount of water and power to use to wash it, then communicate that information to the dryer.

My newish washer already does this.  And my oldish dryer already has an auto-dry setting that monitors the humidity.  Although, this doesn't work well for things like blankets and synthetics.
Logged

Hadron Smasher on 360; IsgrimnurTTU on PS3
Dante Rising
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2406


View Profile
« Reply #18 on: January 12, 2015, 06:49:53 AM »

Quote from: wonderpug on January 09, 2015, 02:34:46 AM

Have any tv companies hinted at developing flexible TVs?  Flat for everyday use, curved as much or as little as you want when one or two are watching?


Funny that you should ask:

http://www.engadget.com/2014/01/06/lg-77-inch-curved-oled-tv/

Highly expensive for the moment, however
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.166 seconds with 62 queries. (Pretty URLs adds 0.055s, 2q)