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Author Topic: Books Read in 2011  (Read 7885 times)
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MonkeyFinger
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« Reply #80 on: April 17, 2011, 11:46:12 PM »

The Dresden Files books are good, I made it up to five or six before something shinier caught my eye, need to get back to them.

Funny, but I've gotten sucked into an 'Independant Reader' series by Brandon Mull called 'Fablehaven'. Read the first one then grabbed the rest of the series (five books in all), halfway through the fourth book now.  icon_cool
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« Reply #81 on: April 18, 2011, 02:49:03 AM »

Quote from: JayDee on April 17, 2011, 03:01:03 AM

I've been reading "The Day After Tomorrow" by Alan Folsom for what feels like forever now. The book is pretty good but it's a big one and it tends to drag in places. Also there is like 160 chapters and each is only a few pages long.

I should finish it this week.

I read that about 100 years ago, it seems. I also remember enjoying it quite a bit. Thanks for the reminder, I'll have to look it up again.
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« Reply #82 on: April 18, 2011, 05:33:02 PM »

HOMEFRONT: Voice of Freedom.
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« Reply #83 on: April 20, 2011, 08:38:37 PM »

I just started "The Lies of Lockmora".  It's great so far.

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« Reply #84 on: April 22, 2011, 05:03:30 AM »

Finished The Fifth Witness by Michael Connelly today. I really enjoyed it and like the direction he's taking the Haller books.

Next up,  The King of Plagues by Maberry.
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« Reply #85 on: April 22, 2011, 12:46:56 PM »

Quote from: lildrgn on April 22, 2011, 05:03:30 AM


Next up,  The King of Plagues by Maberry.

Sweet.  Enjoy. 

Any idea when the next one comes out??
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« Reply #86 on: April 22, 2011, 03:44:37 PM »

No, but WRT King of Plagues, what a brutal first chapter! Yow.
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« Reply #87 on: April 22, 2011, 06:43:54 PM »

Quote from: lildrgn on April 22, 2011, 05:03:30 AM

Next up,  The King of Plagues by Maberry.

Same here.  Just picked it up from the library.   drool
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« Reply #88 on: April 23, 2011, 04:14:24 AM »

just finished up "girl with dragon tattoo."  looking forward to starting on the second one soon.

for the days on the bus ride in when I don't nap, I have a certain local author's zombie book in my kindle app.  been a fun read so far.
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« Reply #89 on: April 27, 2011, 03:51:47 AM »

The Hobbit - JRR Tolkein:  While I adore LOTR, I have to admit...I didn't really like The Hobbit all that much.  It was simply pretty boring, and I couldn't get into it at all.  Glad I read it so I can cross it off the "classics I need to read" list, but I sure won't be going back to it any time soon.
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« Reply #90 on: May 01, 2011, 12:54:37 PM »

Dune by Frank Herbert...again.

Council of the Cursed by Peter Tremayne

Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson

Dragon Keeper by Robin Hobb...still my favorite author.

The Colour of Magic by Terry Pratchett..first discworld novel.

Furies of Calderon by Jim Butcher

Doomsday Book by Connie Willis..Hugo and Nebula award winner.
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« Reply #91 on: May 03, 2011, 01:21:01 AM »

Guests of the Ayatollah  by Mark Bowden.     Bowden brings the same energy and thoroughness  to studying the Iran Hostage Crisis that he did to the Battle of Mogadishu in Black Hawk Down.     I'm  reading this in tandem with a rereading of Delta Force by Col. Charlie Beckwith  as both cover the hostage crisis with a different focus.
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« Reply #92 on: May 06, 2011, 04:18:58 PM »

Just finished The King of Plagues last night. Was a quick read, but I found some of the main elements to be a little... off.

Spoiler for Hiden:
Specifically the Seven Kings and their "all-in" attitude with the Goddess. Just didn't seem authentic to me. Stuff like, "TO THE GODDESS!" just seemed weird.
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« Reply #93 on: May 07, 2011, 02:14:34 PM »

Yea, I agree about that.  I still thoroughly enjoyed it. 

I finished Lies of Locke Lamora and found it to be excellent. 

I'm currently reading Trojan Horse, by David Lender.

Here is the summary:
Quote
Daniel Youngblood is a world-weary oil and gas investment banker who’s ready to hit the beach, when he’s hired by a Saudi Prince for an OPEC deal where he can net himself $25 million as a swan song. At the same time, he meets and falls in love with Lydia, an exotic European fashion photographer, who he later discovers is really CIA-trained spy with a shocking past with the Saudi Prince. She convinces Daniel to enlist in what becomes a race for the lovers to stop a Muslim terrorist internet plot to bring down the Saudi royal family and cripple the world’s oil capacity, all before they wind up dead.

An excerpt from Bull Street, David Lender's upcoming thriller set on Wall Street during the financial crisis, follows the text of Trojan Horse.

I'm about halfway through it and am really enjoying it.  It's a $0.99 Kindle book, and well worth it.
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« Reply #94 on: May 10, 2011, 05:14:55 PM »

Just finished.....

The Great Influenza by John Barry



Did you know that from 1918-1919 a influenza epidemic killed 675,000 Americans and somewhere between 50-100 million people world wide? And the infuenza was most deadly against the "healthiest" age group...the 20-35 year olds.

This book covers the epidemic, with an interesting background on the medical profession prior to that time.

The book is probably overly long, with a little too much medical stuff for most but I think the overall effect is a book that will educate and perhaps scare the average reader. Since most of the world isn't any more prepared for a killer influenza than it was then.

The author also makes an interesting point I had never heard of...that influenza can effect the mental well being of those who survive the illness. There are ties between the flu and mental disease.

3.5 of 5
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« Reply #95 on: May 20, 2011, 11:52:53 PM »

The Heroes - Joe Abercrombie

A wholly remarkable tale of a 3-day battle, told from the perspective of both sides.  Abercrombie is at his finest when writing about war, and he doesn't disappoint here.  Bloody and brutal with enough twists and turns to keep you on the edge of your seat the entire time.  Even by the end, I wasn't sure who I wanted to win since he painted such a remarkable portrayal of complex characters.  While reading the other books add significant  emotional impact, this could be easily recommended as a stand-alone book.  I cannot recommend it highly enough - A+, 5 stars, 10 out of 10, etc.

The only bad thing about this book is that having read the First Law Trilogy, Best Served Cold, and The Heroes over the last little while, I'll have to wait a while to revisit this world.  Abercrombie has cemented himself as #1a to Martin's #1, and I cannot wait to see what he does next.
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« Reply #96 on: May 23, 2011, 08:38:46 PM »

Quote from: Flatlander on May 03, 2011, 01:21:01 AM

Guests of the Ayatollah  by Mark Bowden.     Bowden brings the same energy and thoroughness  to studying the Iran Hostage Crisis that he did to the Battle of Mogadishu in Black Hawk Down.     I'm  reading this in tandem with a rereading of Delta Force by Col. Charlie Beckwith  as both cover the hostage crisis with a different focus.

I thought Guests of the Ayatollah was a pretty good book. The chapters on the rescue demonstrated to me a certain ignorance on behalf of the American side as the rescue had no chance at success. And should they not have had helicopter problems it could have been a very bloody mess.
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« Reply #97 on: May 23, 2011, 08:44:20 PM »

The First Law: The Blade Itself by Joe Abercrombie


I really enjoyed this book. I put it at a par with the First Omnibus of the Black Company Trilogy. The characters created by Abercrombie are all memorable and yet during the first book you have no idea how most them relate. You know (or think) at some point that they must all come together.

I have already started the second book in the trilogy with all the hope that Abercrombie will continue the excellent writing and that these books will not fall apart like the later Black Company Books.

Easily  4.5 of 5 *
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« Reply #98 on: May 24, 2011, 03:41:23 PM »

Quote from: Scuzz on May 23, 2011, 08:44:20 PM

The First Law: The Blade Itself by Joe Abercrombie


I really enjoyed this book. I put it at a par with the First Omnibus of the Black Company Trilogy. The characters created by Abercrombie are all memorable and yet during the first book you have no idea how most them relate. You know (or think) at some point that they must all come together.

I have already started the second book in the trilogy with all the hope that Abercrombie will continue the excellent writing and that these books will not fall apart like the later Black Company Books.

Easily  4.5 of 5 *

They just get better, actually.  And his two stand-alone books in that world (Best Served Cold and The Heroes) are even better, imo.
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« Reply #99 on: June 07, 2011, 04:34:17 AM »

Just finished Collusion by Stuart Neville, the follow up to his excellent The Ghosts of Belfast (aka The Twelve in the UK).

These two books were violent, intense, emotional and pretty brutal. Do read Ghosts/12 first, as they are definitely sequential.

Highly recommended.
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« Reply #100 on: June 12, 2011, 12:08:47 AM »

Quote from: lildrgn on June 07, 2011, 04:34:17 AM

Just finished Collusion by Stuart Neville, the follow up to his excellent The Ghosts of Belfast (aka The Twelve in the UK).

These two books were violent, intense, emotional and pretty brutal. Do read Ghosts/12 first, as they are definitely sequential.

Highly recommended.

Awesome recommendation, next on my list.  They sound great.

I'm almost finished with Scott Lynch's "Red Seas under Red Skies" and it is a fantastic equal to Lies of Lockmora, and I may now be an actual Scott Lynch fanboy.  Fantastic series and I can't wait for the 3rd.
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« Reply #101 on: June 12, 2011, 04:09:56 AM »

I really enjoyed those books, Eco. And I have to thank my local library for introducing Neville, Nesbo, and others to me on their "Recommended Reads" shelf. I have a bunch yet to go through, including a series about, what else, a detective, in Sweden, I think. A bit trendy, but I love 'em!
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« Reply #102 on: June 13, 2011, 04:14:56 PM »

Just finished both 'Feed' and 'Deadline', the first two books in the Newsflesh trilogy by Mira Grant (Pen name of Seanan McGuire).  Excellent reads (dunno if they've been mentioned here before, too long, didn't read the whole thread.)  If anyone would like me to give a basic world rundown, lemme know.
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« Reply #103 on: June 13, 2011, 10:08:36 PM »

Quote from: Dreamshadow on June 13, 2011, 04:14:56 PM

Just finished both 'Feed' and 'Deadline', the first two books in the Newsflesh trilogy by Mira Grant (Pen name of Seanan McGuire).  Excellent reads (dunno if they've been mentioned here before, too long, didn't read the whole thread.)  If anyone would like me to give a basic world rundown, lemme know.

Go for it smile
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« Reply #104 on: June 14, 2011, 12:28:48 AM »

Basically, the setting is a world where the zombie uprising happened, and humanity survived.  But so did the zombies, or more accurately what created them.  The cure for cancer and the cure for the common cold worked great and did exactly what they set out to do, then they met.  Anything over 60kg would reanimate after death under control of the virus and try to spread the active version, aka zombie time.  During the uprising bloggers and citizen journalists became the primary way news got around, since everyone else was either under the govt's thumb or dealing with the uprising. It became the way to report the news.  The story follows two young adults, Shaun and Georgia Mason, an Irwin and a newsie respectively, as they report on the post-Rising world.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kUXWlXK985U is an official 'trailer' for the series, though it skims over some of the details of the base story.

The third book is due out this time next year.

(Irwin - blogs about going out and poking Zombies with a stick,  Newsie - blogs about news events, including zombie situations.)
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« Reply #105 on: June 15, 2011, 01:08:31 PM »

A Feast for Crows - George RR Martin:  This was my 2nd time through, and I enjoyed it much more this time around.  I read it for what it was, rather than being frustrated by what it wasn't (i.e. leaving out many of my favorite characters).  While it's certainly the weakest of the 4 books, it's still a very fun read.
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« Reply #106 on: June 15, 2011, 04:04:34 PM »

The First Law Series: Book 2

Before They are Hanged

by Joe Abercrombie




I was pleased that the second book in the series continued the excellent writing of the first. This book continues the adventures and ends with disappointment, death and mystery. And I am looking forward to the third book, which I will start today.

There are some great characters in these books, and while Abercrombie added sex to the second book (meh) he maintained his wonderful work in fleshing out the characters from the first book.

And I still have no idea how this will end.
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« Reply #107 on: June 16, 2011, 12:47:34 AM »

Quote from: Dreamshadow on June 14, 2011, 12:28:48 AM

Basically, the setting is a world where the zombie uprising happened, and humanity survived.  But so did the zombies, or more accurately what created them.  The cure for cancer and the cure for the common cold worked great and did exactly what they set out to do, then they met.  Anything over 60kg would reanimate after death under control of the virus and try to spread the active version, aka zombie time.  During the uprising bloggers and citizen journalists became the primary way news got around, since everyone else was either under the govt's thumb or dealing with the uprising. It became the way to report the news.  The story follows two young adults, Shaun and Georgia Mason, an Irwin and a newsie respectively, as they report on the post-Rising world.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kUXWlXK985U is an official 'trailer' for the series, though it skims over some of the details of the base story.

The third book is due out this time next year.

(Irwin - blogs about going out and poking Zombies with a stick,  Newsie - blogs about news events, including zombie situations.)

I decided to read Feed next, thanks for the recommendation.  I'm already a quarter of the way through it and it's great so far.    Deadline will be next on my list. 
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« Reply #108 on: June 19, 2011, 04:37:48 PM »

I really got behind on updating my list.  I do have a few comments regarding my most recent read,
  The Dragon Factory,  by Mayberry. 
 This is the 2nd book in the Joe Ledger series.   Joe Legder is an entertaining character and the premise of the series while hardly original, has the potential to be exciting and fun.
In The Dragon Factory, Mayberry seems to jump genres here as the first one was basically a horror/ zombie book while this one has an entirely different tone.  In fact, the author could have switched the all of the characters in this book with James Bond characters and easily pawned it off as a 007 book.  From the cheezy villians and mad scientists to the world wide evil organization, this book was a cliche driven, Ian Fleming derivative from page one.
  I really enjoyed Mayberry's first Ledger book and expected better than this outting.  Thats not to say the book was a terrible read, it was decent but in the end I had a hard time getting past the completely cliche manner in which the book was written.  Honestly, it would have been better as a 007 book, or at least more acceptable.  Oh and I did not like the way the book was wrapped up...at all.

Ill stick with the series for the next book with hopes that The King of Plagues proves to be better.
 
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« Reply #109 on: June 20, 2011, 05:30:25 PM »

Quote from: rshetts2 on June 19, 2011, 04:37:48 PM

Ill stick with the series for the next book with hopes that The King of Plagues proves to be better.
 

I had similar impressions about The Dragon Factory, feeling it was a step down from Patient Zero, but rest assured that The King of Plagues is better. 
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« Reply #110 on: June 26, 2011, 12:16:26 PM »

I finished Feed, by Mira Grant (thanks for the recommendation).  It was outstanding, in my opinion.

Pete and  lildrgn, since you both like the Ledger books I really think you would enjoy Feed.

I'm started the 2nd one, Deadline, and it appears to be more of the same which is a good thing.
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« Reply #111 on: June 26, 2011, 02:00:17 PM »

Recently read "Retribution Falls" by Chris Wooding and loved every minute of it. Kind of a steam punk retro-future sky pirate kind of tale. The misadventures of the Ketty Jay's captain, his misfit crew and their mysterious passenger will remind you of Firefly. I read the last ~250 pages all in one sitting. There's a sequel called "The Black Lung Captain" that I'll jump on when it comes out here next month, and two more volumes are planned. icon_cool
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« Reply #112 on: June 27, 2011, 05:15:44 PM »

After a two month reading hiatus due to being very busy at work, being sidetracked by gaming, and staying home for most of June to take care of my one year old son I have FINALLY finished The Day After Tomorrow. I thought it started off strong but ultimately it felt long and bloated and I just wanted it to end by the last third or so.

I'm going to start another reading streak with something light and easy, another Reacher adventure.
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« Reply #113 on: June 27, 2011, 06:26:46 PM »

Anyone read John Sandford's "Prey" series? I've been recommended them by a friend who says if I like Reacher books I'll LOVE this series.
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« Reply #114 on: June 28, 2011, 01:17:03 AM »

Just finished Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro.

saywhat

Started off interesting, I suppose. But then it was sort of like a mystery that had no end. It was all about feelings and missed opportunities and by the end, I was feeling gypped. I thought it was highly recommended but either I missed something or it was just lacking.

Now reading Those Guys Have All the Fun: Inside the World of ESPN by James Andrew Miller and Tom Shales. Already more interesting.
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« Reply #115 on: June 28, 2011, 04:21:12 PM »

Quote from: JayDee on June 27, 2011, 06:26:46 PM

Anyone read John Sandford's "Prey" series? I've been recommended them by a friend who says if I like Reacher books I'll LOVE this series.

I've read a few of the "Prey" series a number of years ago.  A friend gave me a shopping bag full of books and five or six were from the Prey series.  While there were some carry-over themes or storylines I didn't quite notice much of a big-picture storyline that would permeate the entire series.  It seemed like you could read any book in any sort of order as they more or less stood alone, each with its own killer who had his/her own specific style of "prey".  I enjoyed the stories more or less, but I just wasn't entirely grabbed by the style or content.  I'm not too terribly into murder mysteries, enjoying action/adventure series more.  They're decent enough to give one a try and see if the characters and series grabs you more than it did me.  I couldn't even make it past the first few chapters in my first Reacher book, in part because I've been so distracted by other things, but in part because something just didn't quite "click".  Plus I've got series I'm already elbow deep into that I want to continue (like the Sigma books).

Right now I'm getting ready to read the newest Sigma Force novel by James Rollins, called "The Devil Colony."  Sounds fun, Painter Crowe plays a more prominent role, and I'm anxious to see if Seichen makes a return appearance as she was noticeably absent in the last story (can't remember the name, but dealt with world-conquering autistics).
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« Reply #116 on: June 28, 2011, 06:19:06 PM »

I'm reading The Wilding by Benjamin Percy right now and it's the best novel I've read in quite some time.
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« Reply #117 on: July 13, 2011, 03:47:03 PM »

The Last Argument of Kings

by Joe Abercrombie

This is book three of the First Law trilogy. It is a very good book ending a very good trilogy. The events in the book are follow the characters established in the first book. There is war and great battles and enough death for anyone, all told in Abercrombie's unique style.

Perhaps not the best trilogy ever....but easily in the top ten.

4.5 of 5
Highly Recomended
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« Reply #118 on: July 14, 2011, 03:28:55 AM »

A Clash of Kings

Blah blah blah, forgot a lot of stuff, remembered a few big details, not much else, on to book 3, blah blah blah...  smile
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« Reply #119 on: July 20, 2011, 04:02:05 PM »

Finished the next book in James Rollins' Sigma Series, The Devil Colony.  The story was decently paced and full of Rollins' typical action and adventure, but it also had one of his most glaring flaws, his inability to explain a major plot point.  It allows a mechanism for progression of the story, but it never earns any resolution or explanation. 

Minor storyline spoiler:

Spoiler for Hiden:
The primary story element is prehistoric nanotechnology developed by an ancient civilization.  The DARPA team travels the globe to save the world from the dangers this technology poses to humankind, but you never even get a partial explanation as to how such a technology could exist.  You are merely expected to accept its existence, dangers, and solution without any clarification.   saywhat


But, ignoring this fairly major plot issue, the story overall is a fun ride and ends with quite the shocking cliffhanger.  It seems with most of Rollins' work you have to suspend a great deal of disbelief, but his stories are at least a fun ride.

Now reading Gideon's Sword, Preston and Child's newest character series while waiting for the new Pendergast book.  I wasn't sure what I thought at first, but once they provide a bit of background on the character the story rapidly picks up, especially when you encounter a familiar face.   icon_cool
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