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Author Topic: Books Read in 2009  (Read 18498 times)
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Frogstar
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« Reply #120 on: June 25, 2009, 02:32:13 PM »

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I Will Teach You To Be Rich (If you haven't read this book, its good - life changing! - highly recommend it)

Looks interesting.  And I do want to be rich.  icon_biggrin  This will be my next read.

In terms of fiction, I just finished Mystic River, by Dennis Lehane.  Loved it.  The only other book I've read by Lehane was Shutter Island, which I also loved (and which has been made into a movie that is coming out soon, I think).

I'm thinking of reading another Lehane book. Anyone have suggestions as to which one I should pick?
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Razgon
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« Reply #121 on: June 26, 2009, 05:52:22 PM »

I tried to read The Road, but just coulndt get it...I disliked the style of writing immensely, and the spacing and paragraphing in the book just made no sense whatsoever either...

Anyone else had those issues and /or will it get better, or is this the wrong thread to discuss this in?
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Zero
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« Reply #122 on: June 27, 2009, 05:49:48 AM »

Quote from: Frogstar on June 25, 2009, 02:32:13 PM

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I Will Teach You To Be Rich (If you haven't read this book, its good - life changing! - highly recommend it)

Looks interesting.  And I do want to be rich.  icon_biggrin  This will be my next read.

Its written from a really good perspective.  One of the things that really caught my eye (for example) was how he talked about focusing on the right things to save money on.  People have this idea that if you don't go to Starbucks and buy your daily $4 coffee - that it will save you a lot of money, but then not even look at other expenses in their lives where they can save real money.  He also emphasized that you need to have fun with saving, otherwise you will never do it.  For example, you get a year-end bonus - he said splurge and spend on what you enjoy and save half of it.  It encourages you to save while at the same time enjoying the reason why you work and life itself.  I found the book to be a pretty fast read and really has some pretty good tips.
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kathode
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« Reply #123 on: June 27, 2009, 09:05:55 PM »

Quote from: kathode on June 07, 2009, 05:28:46 PM

I went to B&N last night to find a new book to tear through before it arrives and picked up Kafka on the Shore by Murakami, because I did a search on Amazon and it appeared Murakami hadn't been Kindle-ized yet.

Also picked up a graphic novel that's supposed to be pretty good called Exit Wounds, which is about life in Tel Aviv.

Finished the Murakami book yesterday.  Really really enjoyed it.  Very surreal and everything is not neatly wrapped up at the end, which is how he tends to write.  Really liked the characters and how the narrative alternated between the two main protagonists.  I may try to read everything by Murakami.

Finished Exit Wounds as well.  Read it in about an hour one afternoon.  Great comic, though not at all what I expected.  Mostly about the relationship of an old man and his son after he disappears following a terrorist attack.

Next up is probably Storm of Swords, which will no doubt eat up about two months of reading time, though I bought the Complete HP Lovecraft on Kindle as well.
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kathode
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« Reply #124 on: June 27, 2009, 09:17:10 PM »

Quote from: Razgon on June 26, 2009, 05:52:22 PM

I tried to read The Road, but just coulndt get it...I disliked the style of writing immensely, and the spacing and paragraphing in the book just made no sense whatsoever either...

Anyone else had those issues and /or will it get better, or is this the wrong thread to discuss this in?

Cormac McCarthy definitely has a specific style and you'll see the same mannerisms in his other books.  Very much like Faulkner in terms of weirdness.  I find his writing style very evocative but I've definitely heard of people being turned off by it.  For the most part, if you don't like the style at the beginning, it probably won't improve for you.
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jztemple2
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« Reply #125 on: July 08, 2009, 03:02:48 PM »

Updated as read on my OO list (linkie at bottom):

"Dr. Johnson's London" by Liza Picard 7/6/09
"Umbrella Mike" by Brock Yates 6/30/09

I have joined Paperbackswap.com (which isn't just paperbacks) and so have had a sudden increase in books arriving at the house. My wife has been questioning whether I'll ever be able to have time to read all these books. I pointed out that based on number of books read per month, life expectancy and planned retirement, right now I should finish my outstanding surplus about 2021. So, as I noted, I am merely laying in a stockpile for after that time, since due to global warming it will probably be too hot to go outside anyway   slywink
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Moliere
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« Reply #126 on: July 08, 2009, 03:20:48 PM »

Quote from: jztemple2 on July 08, 2009, 03:02:48 PM

I have joined Paperbackswap.com (which isn't just paperbacks) and so have had a sudden increase in books arriving at the house.

That's a great service. After 2 years I've received 16 books and mailed 20 books.
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jztemple2
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« Reply #127 on: July 08, 2009, 04:33:54 PM »

I'm a bit more of a serious book swapper. In one month I've received 71, given away 66; thank goodness I can buy credits  icon_smile. I have forty years worth of books I've collected as ammunition, so to speak, but it didn't hurt that the first day I posted to my Bookshelf one person requested 32 books from me  icon_eek.

My wife wonders why I'm "giving away" so many books, but I point out to her that I'm just getting rid of the ones I've read and don't care about keeping, while I'm getting ones I want while spending a lot less than if I bought them in a bookstore.
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Moliere
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« Reply #128 on: July 14, 2009, 07:50:40 PM »

Slow month so far. I've only managed to finish “The Art of War” by Sun Tzu and “Marco Polo – From Venice to Xanadu” by Laurence Bergreen. The Marco Polo book was interesting because it provided all the details about a person that we've all heard of, but usually know very little about. I always saw him as some Italian dude that went to China. The actual story is that his father and Uncle were merchants from Venice that traveled the "Silk Road" to China and met with Kublai Khan. They returned to Europe in order to relay a request from the Khan to the Pope. Marco was a 17 year old kid that accompanied his father and Uncle on the return trip to see Kublai Khan in 1272. They ended up staying in Mongolia and China for the next 17 years working for the Khan. When they were finally given permission to leave, just before Kublai's death, it still took another 2 years to get back to Europe. Marco participated in a naval battle against Genoa, a neighboring rival city-state to Venice, that ultimately left him a P.O.W. Being from the Nobel class gave him additional freedoms and to pass the time he worked with another prisoner to write his Travels anthology. Most of his contemporaries couldn't believe the stories about a mythical Japan, the size of Chinese cities, and his descriptions of Kublai's royal court. It wasn't until hundreds of years later that most of his account was vindicated as accurate.
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« Reply #129 on: July 14, 2009, 08:59:02 PM »

With the Old Breed by E.B. Sledge

E.B. Sledge was a marine during WW2 who fought on Pelelui Island and Okinawa. This book was used in Burn's recent WW2 documentary and is one of the sources for HBO's upcoming Pacific "Band of Brothers" type series.

The book reads much different than Band of Brothers. This is done in first person. It was written 40 years after the war by Sledge based on his memories, notes and diaries.

The book is also different in that instead of concentrating on Sledge and his fellow marines it makes a strong statement about the violence and, for lack of a better word, hellishness of war. In one area of the book he describes the battlefield on Okinawa and the mud as being alive with maggots from the unburied bodies. He looks at the ugly part of the Pacific War. There is no romance here and damn little comedy.

4 1/2 * out of 5
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kronovan
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« Reply #130 on: July 15, 2009, 03:15:49 PM »

After a few attempts I finally completed Richard Morgan's Broken Angels. While I didn't quite enjoy it as much as his Altered Carbon I still thought it was a very good read. With the amount of expository passages -many of them excellent- he shoves in a novel I really think Morgan should take a turn at screen plays. Just his tech ideas alone would be mind boggling on the big screen - provided the artistic and effects crew didn't go crazy creating them.

While reading Broken Angels I broke off to read Don Bassingthwaithe's The Doom of Kings It's the 1st -and currently only released- novel in a new trilogy set in the D&D world of Eberron. I though Bassingthwaithe's Dragon Below trilogy was excellent, but this new series looks like it will surpass it. This book deals with the Goblin Kingdoms and his attention to detail for culture and politics is so deep that I'm going to say it's close to a landmark book in the fantasy genre. Goblins have always been very different in D&D worlds compared to those constructed by Lewis, Tolkien and others. This book really defines that difference and I was surprised how much I could cheer for it's Goblin protagonists.  For those thrown by the D&D association, rest assured that Bassingthwaithe is technically an excellent writer and that's starting to get noticed by some critics. The 2nd  book is due out Sept 1 - can't wait.

Another book that temporarily lured me away from Broken Angels was Jim Butchers Storm Front - book 1 in the Dresden Files series. Having been critically acclaimed and spun into a - unfortunately failed - TV series, I'm sure this book needs no introduction. As with many before me, I loved the book and will now work through the series. I have to say that Butcher has one of the best writing techniques I've read in some time. That actually threw me a bit at 1st, because I was given the impression that the book was intended for a younger audience. That was actually a side effect of the excellent flow which comes about via his textbook perfect writing technique. An excellent read and very much recommended.
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Kevin Grey
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« Reply #131 on: July 15, 2009, 04:02:01 PM »

Quote from: kronovan on July 15, 2009, 03:15:49 PM

After a few attempts I finally completed Richard Morgan's Broken Angels. While I didn't quite enjoy it as much as his Altered Carbon I still thought it was a very good read. With the amount of expository passages -many of them excellent- he shoves in a novel I really think Morgan should take a turn at screen plays. Just his tech ideas alone would be mind boggling on the big screen - provided the artistic and effects crew didn't go crazy creating them.

Morgan's Market Forces actually started as a screenplay that he couldn't get produced so he turned it into a book.  Altered Carbon was optioned by Silver Pictures but has never get off of the ground and I don't know if he was involved in any screenplays for it. 

Quote
Another book that temporarily lured me away from Broken Angels was Jim Butchers Storm Front - book 1 in the Dresden Files series. Having been critically acclaimed and spun into a - unfortunately failed - TV series, I'm sure this book needs no introduction. As with many before me, I loved the book and will now work through the series. I have to say that Butcher has one of the best writing techniques I've read in some time. That actually threw me a bit at 1st, because I was given the impression that the book was intended for a younger audience. That was actually a side effect of the excellent flow which comes about via his textbook perfect writing technique. An excellent read and very much recommended.

Dresden Files is pretty much my favorite series going right now.  It's like written crack.  It punches all of the same buttons for me that Buffy and Angel did on TV.  I actually didn't think too much of Storm Front- it was fun but I honestly don't know if I wouldn't have continued without the praise for the later books.  But each book is generally better than the last and by about Book 5 (Death Masks) it is pretty much pure awesome from start to finish. 

I also think Butcher could teach a thing or two to other authors (and even some TV show runners) about how to avoid overexposure of an awesome supporting cast.

I think I'll finally be reading Butcher's Codex Alera fantasy series in the very near future.  Quite a few people actually prefer them to Dresden. 
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kronovan
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« Reply #132 on: July 15, 2009, 05:52:30 PM »

Quote from: Kevin Grey on July 15, 2009, 04:02:01 PM

I actually didn't think too much of Storm Front- it was fun but I honestly don't know if I wouldn't have continued without the praise for the later books.  But each book is generally better than the last and by about Book 5 (Death Masks) it is pretty much pure awesome from start to finish.

I wasn't sold on a lot of the subject matter in Storm Front, but Butcher's writing style kept me along for the ride. Way back as teen I read Hammett's Maltese Falcon and Red Plague and in a strange way Storm Front gave me a sense of Nostalgia. It's good to know the other books are even better.


Quote
I also think Butcher could teach a thing or two to other authors (and even some TV show runners) about how to avoid overexposure of an awesome supporting cast.

Agree, and the way in which the SciFi channel consolidated some of his characters and altered Bob, is IMO a good example of how to get it wrong.

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I think I'll finally be reading Butcher's Codex Alera fantasy series in the very near future.  Quite a few people actually prefer them to Dresden. 

I was actually looking for book 1 of the Codex Alera, but couldn't find it in local stores and it's rarely IN at the library. Don Bassingthwaithe had a blurb about Furies of Calderon on his blog and commented on the excellent world building. Failing in my search for a copy I went with Storm Front. I think I'm going to go with Furies of Calderon for my next Buther read and then bounce back to Dresden Files book 2. slywink
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Kevin Grey
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« Reply #133 on: July 15, 2009, 06:08:08 PM »

FWIW, I've heard that the first Codex book isn't very good but that the series improves dramatically with the second book. 

Which isn't really surprising when I think about it- a lot of the immediate appeal of Dresden is the first person POV and Harry's personality and I think Butcher has said that he initially struggled to learn how to deal with rotating third person POVs but eventually figured it out. 
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« Reply #134 on: July 16, 2009, 02:45:47 PM »

Just finished a book called Paranoia by Joseph Finder. It's full of high-tech corporate espionage and twists. I found it pretty enjoyable and a quick, easy read. Now reading City of Thieves by David Benioff.
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Moliere
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« Reply #135 on: July 16, 2009, 11:27:59 PM »

Two books in two days: “Phantoms” by Dean Koontz and I reread one of my favorite PMA books: “Feel The Fear And Do It Anyway” by Susan Jeffers
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« Reply #136 on: July 17, 2009, 01:04:25 AM »

The Road by Cormac Mcarthy...started on a Sunday Morning, finished Sunday Afternoon...brilliant. There are 2 events in that book I still think about 6 weeks later.

Shaman's Crossing by Robin Hobb ( my favorite author ).

The Terror by Dan Simmons ... about the tragic Franklin Expedition.
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« Reply #137 on: July 17, 2009, 01:17:52 AM »

Quote from: hammer600 on July 17, 2009, 01:04:25 AM

The Road by Cormac Mcarthy...started on a Sunday Morning, finished Sunday Afternoon...brilliant. There are 2 events in that book I still think about 6 weeks later.

OK, that looks really interesting.  thumbsup
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hammer600
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« Reply #138 on: July 17, 2009, 01:32:30 AM »

Yeah...Pulitzer Prize Winner...I hope you read it Moliere and then post what you thought..Like i said, I read it in one sitting.
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« Reply #139 on: July 17, 2009, 01:37:03 AM »

Quote from: hammer600 on July 17, 2009, 01:32:30 AM

Yeah...Pulitzer Prize Winner...I hope you read it Moliere and then post what you thought..Like i said, I read it in one sitting.

I just ordered it from Paperbackswap.com. Hopefully I will have it in a week or 2 and then move it to the top of the To Be Read pile.
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« Reply #140 on: July 17, 2009, 01:53:09 AM »

I don't want to go on and on about The Road, but my local reading group (about 10 or 12 folks depending ) discussed it for a month. We meet weekly. Honestly, there is one scene in that book that I still think about today. I know I previously posted that there were two, and there are...but this one incident stays with me. Would love to hear some feedback from you fellow readers.
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« Reply #141 on: July 17, 2009, 12:10:09 PM »

As I noted earlier in this thread, the style of writing really put me off of the Road for some reason - but if so many love it that much, I'll probably have to give it another try...
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« Reply #142 on: July 19, 2009, 05:04:18 PM »

As a father, I think a lot about that story and the horrible choices faced in that book.

Aside from the apocalyptic context, to me it's a story about a parent trying to balance the idea of doing anything to keep your child alive with the desire to keep your child from experiencing suffering.  What's the point where you cross that line and try to end the suffering?

An amazing, thought provoking read.
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« Reply #143 on: July 20, 2009, 12:00:20 AM »

Quote from: hammer600 on July 17, 2009, 01:04:25 AM

The Terror by Dan Simmons ... about the tragic Franklin Expedition.

Loved this book. I loaned it to my FIL and need to get it back...

Just finished reading City of Thieves by David Benioff. A story about 2 Russian young men during World War II. One is a boy, the other a possible soldier. They are arrested early on and sent on a mission to find...

Spoiler for Hiden:
eggs.

This is the best book I've read all year. Highly recommended. Funny, devastating, brutal, and moving.
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« Reply #144 on: July 21, 2009, 02:48:09 PM »

Quote from: hammer600 on July 17, 2009, 01:53:09 AM

I don't want to go on and on about The Road, but my local reading group (about 10 or 12 folks depending ) discussed it for a month. We meet weekly. Honestly, there is one scene in that book that I still think about today. I know I previously posted that there were two, and there are...but this one incident stays with me. Would love to hear some feedback from you fellow readers.

I can still vividly remember a bunch of them.  Can't wait for the movie.

Spoiler for Hiden:
One that sticks out is the people who are being kept for food.  The guy who's in some basement with his legs cut off and the wounds burned shut.  Still makes me feel ill to think about.  I also remember a scene where people have a baby roasting on a spit.  Ugh.

I've been really busy and haven't had much time for reading.  Adding to that issue is the fact that my Kindle DX appears to have gotten lost in the mail when I sent it back to Amazon.  I used their UPS return label and dropped it off at a mailing store, and didn't think anything of it.  Two weeks later I still haven't heard a peep from amazon.  I emailed and they said they won't even look into it until after the 30th.  Argh.  I did throw "Half-Blood Prince" into my bag as I'm taking a big trip here in a couple days.  Guess it's time to get through that one smile
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hammer600
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« Reply #145 on: July 22, 2009, 05:19:23 PM »

Just started The Book of Air and Shadows by Michael Gruber.   Seems promising... more to come
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« Reply #146 on: July 23, 2009, 02:13:32 PM »

Quote from: hammer600 on July 17, 2009, 01:53:09 AM

I don't want to go on and on about The Road, but my local reading group (about 10 or 12 folks depending ) discussed it for a month. We meet weekly. Honestly, there is one scene in that book that I still think about today. I know I previously posted that there were two, and there are...but this one incident stays with me. Would love to hear some feedback from you fellow readers.

I finished the book yesterday. It was a page turner and only took me a day to read the 300 pages. I liked it though as Razgon mentions the writing format and style are a bit different. Once I adjusted to that it became more enjoyable. Not surprisingly, the trailer makes it look like the movie will focus more on the conflict between the good guys and bad guys probably with extra wife scenes too. Not that I mind seeing more of Charlize Theron. It was also interesting to read about the comparisons between "The Road" and Fallout 3.

Spoiler for Hiden:
I liked the atmosphere created by the fact that no one had a name or even a description. You didn't know anyone's ethnicity, hair color, or any other physical description. This added to the sense that the whole world was one gray ash covered hell.

The boy's agoraphobia was interesting too. The world made every enclosed space a danger for some kind of horror: either living or dead. Even as they found good things he was still reluctant to go into houses. Or once in the house he didn't want to go upstairs. This sense of dread was passed along to me. At every turn I kept expecting something awful to happen. When they found the fully stocked bunker I'm thinking "this can't end well".

Speaking of the bunker, I didn't understand this need to travel on the road in the first place. What was so special about the coast? Why travel on a major thoroughfare increasing the chance you will run into bad guys instead of hunkering down somewhere. They found at least 3 places that might have been safe for awhile and instead they stayed a couple of days and moved on.

Given the fact that there were no animals it implies a tremendous ecological damage to the environment. Wasn't there some issue with the sun being blocked? The scene at night on the beach also implied that they couldn't see the stars or moon either. There's only so much canned vegetables and vitamins to find then everyone should be developing scurvy.

I have mixed feelings about the "happy" ending. "The man" can't go through with killing his kid and instead leaves him alone in this hellish world. Thirty seconds later the only good people left manage to pick him up and shelter him.
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« Reply #147 on: July 23, 2009, 02:54:12 PM »

Spoiler for Hiden:
Agoraphobia is "fear of wide open spaces, crowds, or uncontrolled social conditions."  One who has it would be running for houses and such, afraid to be outside, rather than afraid to enter a house.
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« Reply #148 on: July 23, 2009, 03:25:37 PM »

Quote from: Isgrimnur on July 23, 2009, 02:54:12 PM

Spoiler for Hiden:
Agoraphobia is "fear of wide open spaces, crowds, or uncontrolled social conditions."  One who has it would be running for houses and such, afraid to be outside, rather than afraid to enter a house.

Spoiler for Hiden:
Claustrophobia then? Or fear of the unknown, i.e., Xenophobia?
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« Reply #149 on: July 23, 2009, 03:55:48 PM »

I think the book had a "happy" ending that had much more to do with the father than the son.  The ending had to do with the father's moral resolution in regards to his son - and whether to leave him in this world or not.  I thought the book was about "The Road" the father traveled to come to that decision.  He comes to a decision at the end which is his happy ending.  An unhappy ending for him would have been if he was unable to make that decision or if the decision was taken from him.

After that it's a mixed bag.  Hope because the son is picked up by travelers that probably won't eat him.  Despair because the world can't be fixed - what man has done can't be undone.

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« Reply #150 on: July 23, 2009, 03:59:41 PM »

Quote from: Moliere on July 23, 2009, 03:25:37 PM

Quote from: Isgrimnur on July 23, 2009, 02:54:12 PM

Spoiler for Hiden:
Agoraphobia is "fear of wide open spaces, crowds, or uncontrolled social conditions."  One who has it would be running for houses and such, afraid to be outside, rather than afraid to enter a house.

Spoiler for Hiden:
Claustrophobia then? Or fear of the unknown, i.e., Xenophobia?

Spoiler for Hiden:
Claustrophobia would work. 

Quote
Claustrophobia is usually described as a fear of enclosed places. A more accurate description might be 'a fear of not having an easy escape route' because for anyone who experiences this phobia this is the predominating feature - you feel a need to be able to get out or get home, quickly.
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« Reply #151 on: July 24, 2009, 01:30:07 PM »

Spoilers to follow...I wish I knew how to do that spoiler thing but I don't.  The scene that has stayed with me is when the mother gave up...lost all hope and I am assuming killed herself. I reread that part several times. Am not sure why it had such an impact on me.
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« Reply #152 on: July 24, 2009, 02:24:12 PM »

[spoiler_]Spoiler text goes here[/spoiler_]

And remove the underscores from the bracketed tags...

Spoiler for Hiden:
Spoiler text goes here
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« Reply #153 on: July 24, 2009, 04:35:32 PM »

Spoiler for Hiden:
  thanks Isgrimnur
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« Reply #154 on: July 26, 2009, 03:54:05 PM »

While on vacation I finished the next Repairman Jack story Conspiracies, then completed Cemetery Dance, and just today I finished the next Sigma novel The Doomsday Key.  The beach seems to really lend itself to a lot of reading, especially when it is a rare escape from the accompanying in-laws. 
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Isgrimnur
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« Reply #155 on: August 01, 2009, 04:44:32 AM »

The Liveship Traders Trilogy:
The second series trilogy in this world by Robin Hobb was a decent follow on to the Farseer Trilogy, but I don't think it was quite as good.  You have ships with living figureheads, sea serpents, pirates, and political intrigue.  There were times that I struggled to keep going and slowed my reading pace, but overall I enjoyed the series.

I'm likely to take a break from Ms. Hobb before tackling the third trilogy in the universe, The Tawny Man series, which has a closer tie to the Farseer books.

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« Last Edit: August 01, 2009, 06:49:41 PM by Isgrimnur » Logged

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« Reply #156 on: August 01, 2009, 08:38:20 AM »

I'm on vacation right now and have been reading a bunch.  It's nice as I've been "out" of reading for awhile.

I just finished The Bad Beginning, book one of Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events.  I really enjoyed this - especially for a "childrens" book.  The humor was really well-done and I'm looking forward to seeing what happens in the rest of the series.

A couple weeks ago I finished Centennial by James Michener.  My dad had read this and when I was home I found it laying around and figured I'd give it a shot.  It ended up scratching a major itch for me and I plowed through the 1,000 or so pages pretty quick.  I love stories about the West and historical fiction in general.  I'm not sure I'm ready for anything else Michener wrote but I loved Centennial.

I'm a hundred pages or so into Shogun by James Clavell.  Like Centennial and Roots, this is one of those classic 70's books I've always wanted to read but never got around to.  It's really good and his description of 1600's Japan is fascinating.

I'm re-reading Tigana by Guy Gavriel Kay.  It's probably my favorite one-volume fantasy novel and I think I enjoy it more the 2nd time knowing what is going to happen.

And last, I started The Demolished Man by Alfred Bester.  I'd never read anything by him and am enjoying it.  The science fiction is dated of course but it holds together well for me.

I ordered both Blood Meridian and The Road but haven't really given them a chance. I got about 20 pages into Blood Meridian and wasn't grabbed by it.  I'll probably focus on it a bit more once I get my reading list cleared out but initial impressions weren't great.

I liked the Liveship Traders Trilogy and read them a couple years ago.  I thought they were a nice change from the Farseer Trilogy.  I really want to read the Tawny Man books but haven't gotten around to it yet.
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Isgrimnur
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« Reply #157 on: August 01, 2009, 06:51:06 PM »

One other element to them is that I've read all six of Hobb's books on the Kindle App on my iPhone.  They're 20% cheaper than buying the paperback and make it much easier to sneak some reading time into my work day on occasion.  Try doing that with a Kindle.  Tongue
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« Reply #158 on: August 02, 2009, 05:03:44 PM »

Isgrimnur, I think you will find that the Tawny Man Trilogy is the best of the three.  I am currently reading her  next trilogy and have just started the third book called Renegade's Magic.

P. S.  my favorite character from the Assassins Apprentice trilogy...the Fool...was also in the Liveship Traders trilogy.
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« Reply #159 on: August 03, 2009, 02:36:06 PM »

I have not read anything in about 4 weeks.
 

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