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Author Topic: Books Read in 2009  (Read 18504 times)
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Moliere
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« Reply #40 on: March 05, 2009, 05:58:08 PM »

I finished "Paul of Dune". I thought it was the worst of the Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson Dune books. I enjoyed the Butler Jihad trilogy showing the origins of the different Dune groups like CHOMP, Spacing Guild, Metats, Suk Doctors, Bene Gesserit, etc. I enjoyed the prequel trilogy showing the previous generation of the 3 Houses Harkonnen, Atreides & Corrino. I even liked the final two books that wrapped up the whole series. "Paul of Dune" was complete filler that provided almost no new insights into the characters. There was no suspense or intrigue. The plots twists were obvious. I'm sure I will end up reading the next two in the series, but with reluctance.
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« Reply #41 on: March 05, 2009, 06:24:18 PM »

Just finished Map of Bones by James Rollins and have started Black Order.  I was a fan of his earlier works which were predominantly adventure fiction, but now he has started to delve into a blend of science and religion and I'm not exactly sure how I feel about his content just yet.  In the introduction to Black Order he mentions taking on the evolution versus creationism debate and based on first-hand experience with forum debates on the topic I am a bit apprehensive of what he has in store, regardless of his perspective.  I'll just have to see how it plays out.

Map of Bones seemed to be a combination of the film National Treasure and the books Angels and Demons and The DaVinci Code.  A fact-finding adventure spanning religious locations throughout Europe.  I hope Black Order has a bit more substance to it as Map of Bones just wasn't very compelling, but as I am waiting for the release of the next Pendergast book Cemetery Dance (May 12), I might as well read something, and I'm going to give Rollins another chance with the next Sigma story.  My wife found them to be compelling, so I'll see if Black Order improves upon Map of Bones.
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« Reply #42 on: March 10, 2009, 01:28:29 PM »

Finished The Whale Warriors. This is easily my favorite book so far this year and I recommend it to everyone (link in my OP). It's the story of a 'radical' environmentalist group that goes to Antarctica to disrupt the Japanese whaling trade.  It's fascinating, moving, full of adventure and has a message that I've not yet full processed.  Haven't finished my Amazon review yet, but it's definitely a 5/5.  thumbsup

Edit: I've already read 2.5 times my entire output of 2008. That is shocking to me. Glad I've rediscovered the hobby.
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« Reply #43 on: March 11, 2009, 01:22:31 PM »

I'm still reading 'The Dark Tower', but just wanted to pop in and say how much I hate Stephen King sometimes. Bastard.
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« Reply #44 on: March 13, 2009, 01:32:57 AM »

Just finished "The End of Faith" by Sam Harris for the second time. The first time was a library copy and this time I was able to redline my own copy. I found this passage in the chapter on consciousness fascinating:

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We all know what it is like to read whole paragraphs, and even pages of a book without assimilating a word. Few of us realize that we spend most of our lives in such a state: perceiving the present - present sights, sounds, tastes, and sensations - only dimly, through a veil of thought. We spend our lives telling ourselves the story of past and future, while the reality of the present goes largely unexplored. (p. 219)
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« Reply #45 on: March 13, 2009, 01:20:19 PM »

eschewing standard literature for the past few months and plowing through a slew of 'graphic novels'.... ok, comics collections.
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« Reply #46 on: March 14, 2009, 02:49:02 AM »

Just finished The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larsson. It's a pretty hefty book (just under 500 pages) and it took about 100 pages to get into, but once it did, the mystery was pretty entertaining. You start with 2 stories, seemingly, then they intertwine and off it goes.

Evidently this book (and his other few) were posthumously published; he died in 2000 (I think that's the date). I found myself really caring about the titular character, and hope to learn about her in what's left of Larsson's books.
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« Reply #47 on: March 16, 2009, 01:54:09 AM »

I'm reading We Were Soldiers Once...and Young and am about 120 pages in.

It totally fits that the source material for the best war movie ever made is possibly the best book about war ever written (but truthfully my reading on such material is limited compared to most I'm sure).
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« Reply #48 on: March 16, 2009, 06:32:27 PM »

Quote from: lildrgn on March 14, 2009, 02:49:02 AM

Just finished The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larsson. It's a pretty hefty book (just under 500 pages) and it took about 100 pages to get into, but once it did, the mystery was pretty entertaining. You start with 2 stories, seemingly, then they intertwine and off it goes.

Evidently this book (and his other few) were posthumously published; he died in 2000 (I think that's the date). I found myself really caring about the titular character, and hope to learn about her in what's left of Larsson's books.

I just finished that too - I loved it but my girlfriend couldn't get into it.  I'm looking forward to the 2nd part, which is due out this summer.
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« Reply #49 on: March 21, 2009, 01:53:27 PM »

READ
Eyes of Prey by John Sandford - March 20th 2009
Your Pregnancy, for the Father to be March 22nd 2009
The Darkest Evening of the Year by Dean Koontz  May 13th, 2009
Predator by Patricia Conwell (boring) June 25th 2009
Odd Hours by Dean Koontz August 16th, 2009
Cell by Stephen King - October 23rd, 2009
Faces by Dean Koontz - November 17th, 2009
READING
Dead Watch - John Sandford

IN QUEUE
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« Reply #50 on: March 21, 2009, 05:20:49 PM »

Just finished Crooked Little Vein by Warren Ellis.  A fun mix of Chandler-esque detective story and the twisted modern underbelly fo America.
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« Reply #51 on: March 21, 2009, 07:15:41 PM »

Quote from: naednek on March 21, 2009, 01:53:27 PM

READ
Eyes of Prey by John Sandford - March 20th 2009

READING


IN QUEUE

Damn, that's oldschool.  Creepy bad guy too.
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« Reply #52 on: March 23, 2009, 01:10:48 AM »

Quote from: SensuousLettuce on March 16, 2009, 01:54:09 AM

I'm reading We Were Soldiers Once...and Young and am about 120 pages in.

It totally fits that the source material for the best war movie ever made is possibly the best book about war ever written (but truthfully my reading on such material is limited compared to most I'm sure).

Finished this today and in my mind every leader in position to order men to war should read this book.  Hal Moore did as great a service to his country writing this book as he did in the blood and mud of the battles he fought.
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« Reply #53 on: March 23, 2009, 05:07:43 AM »

Just finished The Warded Man by Peter V Brett (published as The Painted Man in the UK).  Best fantasy I've read since The Name of the Wind.  Started out great and just kept getting better. 
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« Reply #54 on: March 23, 2009, 03:52:24 PM »

Quote from: Geezer on March 21, 2009, 07:15:41 PM

Quote from: naednek on March 21, 2009, 01:53:27 PM

READ
Eyes of Prey by John Sandford - March 20th 2009

READING


IN QUEUE

Damn, that's oldschool.  Creepy bad guy too.

I agree.  I read a number of the "___ of Prey" books and really enjoyed them.  I liked the lead character and the serial killers were always rather interesting in a creepy sort of way.  But, for some reason I just started reading other things and unfortunately never got back into the series.

As I had mentioned earlier in the thread, I finished Map of Bones a while back and while I was a little disappointed, it was still a step up from Dan Brown's writing style, and I had begun the next book in the series, Black Order.  While on vacation I finished Black Order (I couldn't put the damn book down), and now I'm working through The Judas Strain, which is the next book in the Sigma series.  Black Order was far better than Map of Bones and according to my wife The Judas Strain maintains a comperable level of quality.  I think there's one more Sigma series book on the market (a hardback), and then I'm not sure what will be next on my list.  I'm mainly just passing the time until Cemetery Dance is released in May.   drool
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« Reply #55 on: March 24, 2009, 01:27:30 AM »

Finished The Forever War by Dexter Filkins.  Holy crap, what a book.  If you want to read a non-political book about what it's like in day-to-day life in Iraq and Afghanistan, this is the book you should read.  Nearly every page has a story that will absolutely blow your mind.  It covers every aspect of the conflict as he rides with Marines, meets with insurgents, shadows Iraqi government officials, talks with people on the street, and comes close to being killed at least a dozen times.  Some of it is intensely depressing, some of it is inspiring, and the entire thing gives you a real insight into what it's like to survive in a culture that's being pressed on by violence from all sides.  Absolutely moving and incredible.  5/5

Next up:
Not sure.  I want to read Lost City of Z, the story of Percy Fawcett's obsessive quest for El Dorado.  It sounds great and has been getting really good reviews.  But it might be time to bite the bullet and dive into A Clash of Kings.
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« Reply #56 on: March 30, 2009, 03:41:34 PM »

After 3 months of my 45 minute walks with the puppies 5 days a week I finally finished listening to “The Last Lion - Winston Churchill, Visions of Glory: 1874-1932” by William Manchester. What an action packed life. Its hard not to feel intimidated by how little I've accomplished in comparison. The book is full of amusing anecdotes. Churchill's friend was opening a new play and sent him a telegram saying "Come to the opening night and bring a friend, if you have any." To which Churchill replied "I can't make the opening night, but I will be there on the second night if there is one." Another funny exchange happened in the bathroom. A Labor Party MP was using the urinal when Churchill walked in and stood at the farthest point of the bathroom to use another urinal. The Labor MP said "Feeling standoffish today, are we, Winston?" Churchill replied, "That's right. Every time you see something big, you want to nationalize it." I'm looking forward to Volume 2, 1932-1940.
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« Reply #57 on: April 01, 2009, 01:56:12 PM »

Should finish up the Bioware Prequel: Dragon Age the Stolen Throne.   2/5

I hope the writing in the game is better than this prequel.
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« Reply #58 on: April 01, 2009, 02:25:16 PM »

Finished "Anathem" by Neal Stephenson. Has anyone read his The Big U or In the Beginning was the Command Line? Those are the only remaining Stephenson books I haven't read.
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« Reply #59 on: April 10, 2009, 09:26:22 PM »

I just read ...

The Face of Battle by John Keegan..

Once you get past the first 25-30 pages the book opens up a little and I found myself very interested in it. It explains battle via three "battles", Agincourt, Waterloo and the Somme. A very good book on the subject of how battle is fought and how it has evolved.

4 out of 5
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« Reply #60 on: April 20, 2009, 03:57:09 AM »

Assassin's Apprentice

A much different book than the title suggests.  It was free for the Kindle app for my iPhone.  It was an excellent read and kept me reading past my bedtime on several nights.  It's certainly not as bloodthirsty as the title suggests.  It certainly was a good enough read to sell me the second book through the same method for $6.39, 20% off the paperback price.
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« Reply #61 on: April 20, 2009, 05:07:30 PM »

Anyone have a recommendation for a book about Thomas Jefferson?
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« Reply #62 on: April 20, 2009, 05:51:33 PM »

Quote from: kathode on March 24, 2009, 01:27:30 AM

I want to read Lost City of Z, the story of Percy Fawcett's obsessive quest for El Dorado.  It sounds great and has been getting really good reviews.

Finished this on a plane ride over the weekend.  Quite good and I'd give it a 4/5. Really the most amazing parts are the catalogs of incredible insects and diseases that one can acquire just walking through the Amazon.  Everything from the fish that is known to impale itself inside a man's penis to maggots that get implanted and grow inside your joints.  The story of the search for El Dorado is fascinating as well.  Only issue is that it builds a huge mystery that you want answered definitively, and while it does end with some intriguing finds, the mystery endures.

Next up I have a short novella by Cormac McCarthy called Child of God.  Picked it up in the airport thinking I'd finish City of Z sooner than I did.  After that, it's on to Clash of Kings.
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« Reply #63 on: April 22, 2009, 07:33:23 PM »

Just finished The Judas Strain by James Rollins over my lunch break.  Even better than Black Order.  Good action, compelling story, interesting twists, but a slightly odd and a bit too "out there" ending.  Still, a fun read nonetheless.

Waiting for me at home is the most recent story in the Sigma series, The Last Oracle
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« Reply #64 on: April 22, 2009, 08:02:42 PM »

I've been a slacker on updating my April books.

“Rendezvous With Rama” by Arthur C. Clarke
Great sci-fi novel about our first encounter with an alien ship. The ending was perfect.

“Lightening” by Dean Koontz
A fluffy page turner that had an interesting take on time travel.

“Liberty & Tyranny” by Mark Levin
 Roll Eyes This was given to me as a gift. Why someone would give me a book by a religious conservative radio talk show host I don't know. Anyway, it wasn't particularly good. Lots of platitudes with little substance. More than a few misrepresentations about historical figures, current events, and the nonreligious.

“The Wheel of Darkness” by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child
My first Pendergast novel. I wasn't impressed simply because he's made out to be too perfect. "chiseled features, blond hair & steel gray eyes"  Roll Eyes He walks through locked doors with barely a second with the lock pick. He talks his way effortlessly through any human barrier. There was a scene where someone had a combination lock on a suitcase. He barely knew this person yet guessed their combination on the first try. He's a better Black Jack card counter than professional card counters. He knows more about art than professional art dealers. I don't know, I understand they're light escapist novels, but I was hoping for a little more suspense. Its hard to have suspense when superman is on the case.
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« Reply #65 on: April 22, 2009, 08:40:46 PM »

Quote from: Moliere on April 22, 2009, 08:02:42 PM

“The Wheel of Darkness” by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child
My first Pendergast novel. I wasn't impressed simply because he's made out to be too perfect. "chiseled features, blond hair & steel gray eyes"  Roll Eyes He walks through locked doors with barely a second with the lock pick. He talks his way effortlessly through any human barrier. There was a scene where someone had a combination lock on a suitcase. He barely knew this person yet guessed their combination on the first try. He's a better Black Jack card counter than professional card counters. He knows more about art than professional art dealers. I don't know, I understand they're light escapist novels, but I was hoping for a little more suspense. Its hard to have suspense when superman is on the case.

I know that Pete disagrees but IMO Pendergast works far better when he is a supporting character (as he was in the first couple of books he appeared in).  The books have taken a drop in quality since he started becoming the lead character. 
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« Reply #66 on: April 22, 2009, 08:55:03 PM »

Quote from: Kevin Grey on April 22, 2009, 08:40:46 PM

I know that Pete disagrees but IMO Pendergast works far better when he is a supporting character (as he was in the first couple of books he appeared in).  The books have taken a drop in quality since he started becoming the lead character. 

For me the pinnacle of the series was the Diogenes Trilogy (Brimstone, Dance with Death, and Book of the Dead).  The Wheel Of Darkness was a bit of a letdown after the three prior stories.  Sure, the Superman-esque skills attributed to Pendergast are a bit much, but I still enjoy the uniqueness of his character.  It's like a comic book superhero story about Batman or Superman but in a slightly different vein. 

I can suspend disbelief in both my movie-watching and book-reading, and if a story is a bit outlandish but at least entertaining I can make it all the way through without being too judgemental.  However, there are some books I'll probably never struggle through, such as the Twilight series.  I actually didn't really expect Moliere to really enjoy Wheel as it fell short of prior Preston/Child stories and it probably wasn't an ideal place to begin (especially since it is the end of the series as it stands at the moment.   icon_wink).  I think I have all of their works, so if the interest is there I'd be willing to lend out earlier stories in the series should Moliere be interested.
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« Reply #67 on: April 24, 2009, 05:39:13 PM »

Gonna finish Obscene in the Extreme: The Burning and Banning of John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath today.

It's a solid look into the late 30's controversy surrounding the great American novel, the author focuses 95% of his narrative about the struggles between labor and large growers, 'communist' ideals like better wages for the workers and the backlash against them and Steinbeck for daring to side with the common man.  It was a pretty riveting time and it seems not much has changed since with regard to how capitalism works.  It's quite a fascinating read.  4 of 5.

Up next Aushwitz: A New History.
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« Reply #68 on: April 24, 2009, 06:22:46 PM »

Just finished a book called Child 44 by Tom Rob Smith. It's a murder mystery that takes place in Russia in the 1950s.

I DUG IT.

Highly recommended.
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« Reply #69 on: April 27, 2009, 02:17:24 PM »

Quote from: kathode on April 20, 2009, 05:51:33 PM

Next up I have a short novella by Cormac McCarthy called Child of God.  Picked it up in the airport thinking I'd finish City of Z sooner than I did.  After that, it's on to Clash of Kings.

Finished this book.  My thoughts =  icon_eek This book is about a backwoods redneck guy in a "Deliverance" kind of place in the 1920's or 30's.  He finds himself unable to develop normal human relationships, particularly with women, and slowly descends into a sort of psychopathy.  Every sort of depravity is exhibited from violence and murder to pedophilia, incest, infanticide, and lots of necrophilia.  McCarthy is an amazing writer but this one had some parts that were tough even for me.  2.5/5.

Got Clash of Kings in the mail and dove in last night.  This one's going to take a while.  Huge book, big pages, tiny text smile

Also, if anyone is interested in fantasy literature, we announced a two book Elder Scrolls novel deal with Del Ray, and the author is Greg Keyes.  I'm not that familiar with him although I think I've seen his name mentioned here before.  People here at work who've read the preliminary stuff are very pleased with it.
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« Reply #70 on: April 27, 2009, 02:34:00 PM »

I've just started my 1st novel in 6 months. For the previous 1/2 year I've been moon lighting by doing background research for a friend that writes French travel logs/articles. I won't even bother to list the history books I skimmed or read, but it was 43 all total.  icon_confused

Now that I'm back to easier reading, the 1st work of fiction I've delved into is Richard Morgan's Broken Angels. I just started -about 150 pages in- but so far I'm enjoying this book as much as his excellent Altered Carbon.
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« Reply #71 on: April 27, 2009, 04:39:47 PM »

Quote from: kathode on April 27, 2009, 02:17:24 PM

Also, if anyone is interested in fantasy literature, we announced a two book Elder Scrolls novel deal with Del Ray, and the author is Greg Keyes.  I'm not that familiar with him although I think I've seen his name mentioned here before.  People here at work who've read the preliminary stuff are very pleased with it.

Keyes is a really good author.  I particularly loved his "Calculus of Angels" series.  He also writes really good tie-in stuff (his Babylon 5 and Star Wars novels are highly thought of) so he should be an excellent fit. 
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« Reply #72 on: April 27, 2009, 04:41:22 PM »

Quote from: kronovan on April 27, 2009, 02:34:00 PM

Now that I'm back to easier reading, the 1st work of fiction I've delved into is Richard Morgan's Broken Angels. I just started -about 150 pages in- but so far I'm enjoying this book as much as his excellent Altered Carbon.

I liked BA about equally with Altered Carbon.  Especially the second half which was amazingly intense. However it's the most polarizing of the series with many thinking it's the weakest work of the trilogy though "Woken Furies" gets my vote in that category though I'm in the minority. 
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« Reply #73 on: April 27, 2009, 04:45:38 PM »

Quote from: Geezer on March 16, 2009, 06:32:27 PM

Quote from: lildrgn on March 14, 2009, 02:49:02 AM

Just finished The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larsson. It's a pretty hefty book (just under 500 pages) and it took about 100 pages to get into, but once it did, the mystery was pretty entertaining. You start with 2 stories, seemingly, then they intertwine and off it goes.

Evidently this book (and his other few) were posthumously published; he died in 2000 (I think that's the date). I found myself really caring about the titular character, and hope to learn about her in what's left of Larsson's books.

I just finished that too - I loved it but my girlfriend couldn't get into it.  I'm looking forward to the 2nd part, which is due out this summer.

Read the first two books and they were both pretty good. Haven't gotten around to the third yet.
You just have to get through the first 100 pages. It starts out a bit slow but then it really picks up

The movie based on the first book has been a huge hit in theaters. Worth checking out when it comes out on dvd. (2 next are coming later this year) Doubt they'll show it in theaters the US smile

Just finished:
Jack Ketchum - Off Season : it was okay.
Jack Ketchum - Peaceable Kingdom : very good. Some of the stories are quite brutal.

Tried to get through Jean-Christophe Grange - Flight of the storks, but had to stop halfway through. A lot of action but I was bored to tears anyway.
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« Reply #74 on: April 28, 2009, 03:56:49 PM »

Last night I finally finished The Dark Knight Returns.  I know I'm going to be in the minority and I could risk bannination for what I am about to say, but I didn't really like it that much.  So many lauded it as being revolutionary, groundbreaking, and cutting-edge.  But for me the artwork, story, and even dialogue were all terribly disjointed and haphazard.  Images were sometimes unclear, dialogue progressions didn't always follow a recognizable pattern across the page, and while the book obviously just oozed style, I think it was too much form over function, and because of how much focus was placed on style I think the story and presentation suffered for it.

I absolutely loved Watchmen.  I liked the visual style, the presentation followed a more common and recognized pattern across the page, and it didn't take so much effort to read.  The Dark Knight Returns started off with a great premise, but by the end I just felt like the entire story fell short.  I never found it to be compelling, exciting, or even coherent.  I've read some of Miller's other work and didn't find it to be so disjointed, and unfortunately while I really wanted it to live up to the hype, I don't think it came even close.

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« Reply #75 on: April 29, 2009, 02:36:45 AM »

Quote from: Kevin Grey on April 27, 2009, 04:41:22 PM

Quote from: kronovan on April 27, 2009, 02:34:00 PM

Now that I'm back to easier reading, the 1st work of fiction I've delved into is Richard Morgan's Broken Angels. I just started -about 150 pages in- but so far I'm enjoying this book as much as his excellent Altered Carbon.

I liked BA about equally with Altered Carbon.  Especially the second half which was amazingly intense. However it's the most polarizing of the series with many thinking it's the weakest work of the trilogy though "Woken Furies" gets my vote in that category though I'm in the minority. 

I read Woken Furies a few months ago and I have to say even though I can't pinpoint what the problem was, I would put it at the bottom of the list for the simple fact that it didn't keep my interest and I had to force myself to pick it back up to finish it several times.
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« Reply #76 on: April 29, 2009, 03:44:52 AM »

Quote from: EngineNo9 on April 29, 2009, 02:36:45 AM

I read Woken Furies a few months ago and I have to say even though I can't pinpoint what the problem was, I would put it at the bottom of the list for the simple fact that it didn't keep my interest and I had to force myself to pick it back up to finish it several times.

Yeah, it's kind of hard to pinpoint my reaction as well because I thought it had a neat concept and all of the elements to be the best in the series- I think part of it might have been Kovacs fatigue since I read them all back to back. 

I do know onee big issue I had- the jacket copy of the hardback summarized like the first 200 pages of the book.  So for the first half I had a general feeling of "c'mon, c'mon, I already know what this big secret you're hinting at is..."
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« Reply #77 on: May 05, 2009, 07:42:39 PM »

Finished Aushwitz a new history. It's a very insightful, heart breaking book. 5/5
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« Reply #78 on: May 07, 2009, 09:01:23 PM »

Just finished The Last Oracle by James Rollins (book 5 in the Sigma series).  Rollins is really starting to piss me off.  His ego is becoming more and more apparent in his writing, he's starting to stray from what made the initial books in the series so much fun, which involved The Guild, great action, bad-ass characters, and fun adventure.  Instead I just read a sermon on autism and was left with an ending that just had me wondering, "Ummmmm, WTF?"  And no Seichan?  You've got to be kidding me.  Especially following how The Judas Strain ended.   disgust

If anyone has read Rollins and especially this particular book, I could use a little clarification.

Spoiler for Hiden:
Outside of Pyotr's ability to combine autistic powers like some sort of savant X-Men character, what is with the story's epilogue?  Pyotr's physical shell is sitting in a hospital chair staring out a window and you learn that Pyotr is no longer Pyotr.  Someone else has occupied his physical shell.  But, it's not a human someone else, but an ape or chimpanzee someone else.   saywhat  And it's a male chimpanzee someone else as "he" is used throughout the epilogue to refer to the new occupant, not Pyotr himself.  Who the hell is this new male chimpanzee?  It's not Marta, as she was a female ape or chimpanzee, and I don't recall any other ape/chimpanzee characters who could have inadvertantly occupied Pyotr's body.  It just seems like such a ridiculous and random epilogue that I'm left wondering what the point was or who the hell is Pyotr if he isn't Pyotr, and he's apparently not even human any longer.  At least on the inside, like some kind of monkey M&M.  Double  saywhat

I fucking hate stupid, ridiculous endings, especially by Dan Brown wannabes stroking their own intellectual ego.   mad

At least Cemetery Dance comes out next week.  Bitch better have my money.....I mean, the library better have my copy.   
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« Reply #79 on: May 13, 2009, 02:10:45 AM »

I just read through the Mistborn series by Brandon Sanderson, and if you're looking for a new fantasy series to read I highly recommend it. He's a newer author and doesn't have many books, but both this series and the standalone book Elantris are great. I was most impressed with how the series ended up tying all sorts of details from the book and the mythology of the book together.

On another note, I saw one or two of you read the Kevin Anderson/Brian Herbert Dune books. FYI, Kevin's Saga of the Seven Suns series is a great scifi epic series.
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