http://gamingtrend.com
July 29, 2014, 12:47:05 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Books Read in 2007 (Keep It Updated)  (Read 9995 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
warning
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 7325



View Profile
« Reply #80 on: June 01, 2007, 01:40:12 PM »

I got caught back up into rereading A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin.
Logged
Nth Power
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3451



View Profile
« Reply #81 on: June 01, 2007, 06:54:23 PM »

Quote from: EngineNo9 on June 01, 2007, 01:10:49 PM

Quote from: Nth Power on May 30, 2007, 04:10:09 AM

Finished Caught Stealing by Charlie Huston : 

Loved it!  thumbsup

If you enjoyed the first, definitely check out the follow ups: Six Bad Things and A Dangerous Man. 

Sweet, I'll check those out.  After reading Caught Stealing I went and ordered Already Dead.  I couldn't pass up vampires getting added into the mix.  icon_smile
Logged

"Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities" -Voltaire
XBL gamertag: NthPowr
Kevin Grey
Global Moderator
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13976


View Profile
« Reply #82 on: June 01, 2007, 07:14:49 PM »

Just finished up Tim Powers' "On Stranger Tides".  Been wanting to read it since I first started reading Powers with the release of the amazingly awesome Declare but it was out of print for a long time.  They finally released a new edition last fall.

It was very enjoyable but overall kind of disappointing only because it didn't live up to Powers' usual brilliance. Still for anyone in the mood for some good pirate fantasy it's definitely recommended. 
Logged
Soulchilde
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 5090


You and I have unfinished business


View Profile
« Reply #83 on: June 01, 2007, 07:37:08 PM »

Quote from: Nth Power on May 30, 2007, 04:10:09 AM

Finished Caught Stealing by Charlie Huston : 



Loved it!  thumbsup



Was eyeing this book.  Is it in the same vain of Dresden Files?
Logged

Quote from: Devil on January 12, 2007, 01:14:38 AM

NiM$
Kevin Grey
Global Moderator
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13976


View Profile
« Reply #84 on: June 01, 2007, 07:42:02 PM »

Quote from: Soulchilde on June 01, 2007, 07:37:08 PM

Quote from: Nth Power on May 30, 2007, 04:10:09 AM

Finished Caught Stealing by Charlie Huston : 



Loved it!  thumbsup



Was eyeing this book.  Is it in the same vain of Dresden Files?

If you're looking for something more like Dresden, you would probably prefer Charlie Huston's series starring a Vampire PI named Joe Pitt- so far there are two books in the series:  Already Dead and No Dominion.

The series that starts with Caught Stealing are hard-boiled crime novels but without the supernatural elements. 
Logged
Nth Power
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3451



View Profile
« Reply #85 on: June 11, 2007, 09:10:14 AM »

Finished The Vengeful Virgin by Gil Brewer.


 Money is the root of all evil...well, money and women.  A fun suspenseful read.  thumbsup
Logged

"Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities" -Voltaire
XBL gamertag: NthPowr
Kevin Grey
Global Moderator
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13976


View Profile
« Reply #86 on: June 11, 2007, 12:17:38 PM »

Just finished Birds of Prey by Wilbur Smith.

Awesome first half but the book stumbles a bit in the second half with one of the most ham-handed, nauseating romances I think I've ever read, a doublecross too many, and a relatively sudden change of locale that should have been expanded at the expense of the love story.  Still very enjoyable and worth reading and I'll definitely read the sequel sometime down the road. 
Logged
IkeVandergraaf
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2784


RRoD FTL! F MS!


View Profile
« Reply #87 on: June 11, 2007, 09:26:09 PM »

I recently finished The Cold War:  A New History by John Lewis Gaddis.



Excellent.  Extremely engaging and well written.  I was surprised by how much I enjoyed the book.  Not too long (around 300 pages) but well detailed.  My favorite part of the book was the sixth chapter, "Actors" where Gaddis describes the influence of individuals including Pope John Paul II, Lech Walesa, Deng Xiaoping, Margaret Thatcher, Ronald Reagan and finally Mikhail Gorbachev, on the erosion of communism and the end of the conflict.

Highly recommended.
Logged

Gamertag = IkeV
I KNOW DEEP IN MY NMIND THAT THIS DISGUSTING WEBSITE THAT IS OBIVOUSLY OPERATED BY HIGHSCHOOL DROPOUTS LIVING PURPOSELESS AND JOBLESS LIVES
CrayolaSmoker
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3614

Sponge Bath Slut


View Profile WWW
« Reply #88 on: June 12, 2007, 02:49:39 AM »

Well, since my last update I've finished:

Y: The Last Man - Safeword
Y: The Last Man - Ring of Truth
Y: The Last Man - Girl on Girl
Fables: March of the Wooden Soldiers
Fables: Mean Seasons
Fables: Homelands

Still loving both series. Can't wait to see where they go next.

100 Bullets: First Shot, Last Call - Probably won't continue with this one. The premise is neat, but not entirely engaging.

Ex Machina: The First Hundred Days - Not quite Y or Fables good, but I'm in for the next few TPBs. The last "shot" of the first issue is greatness.

The Nymphos of Rocky Flats by Mario Acevedo - First in a series about a vampire P.I.  I like the concept. I like the characters well enough. What I can't stand is the repitition. EVERY. DAMN. TIME. he hypnotizes someone he has to explain the process, with the exact same beats and phrasing. If I read "tapetum lucidum," "kundalini noir," and their meanings one more time... Not sure if this is a first-time writer problem, or just that the man's a hack. I've recently started the sequel to try and find out.
Logged

Wii: 1429 3414 0674 4114 | 360: CrayolaSmokerGT
smokingcrayolas.net | surrogacy blog
Calvin
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13895

President of G.R.O.S.S.


View Profile
« Reply #89 on: June 12, 2007, 01:19:27 PM »

Kevin (I hope this isn't a derail). Earlier in this thread or in the last iteration you mentioned a series of books you thought I might like-pretty hardcore sci-fi, spaceships (naval battles in space types), intrigue, drama, all that good stuff (maybe a trilogy)-but I can't find it in a search or remember for the life of me. You also mentioned something else, maybe a trilogy about xeno-archaelogy on Mars? Looking for some casual books for later in the summer.
Logged
Kevin Grey
Global Moderator
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13976


View Profile
« Reply #90 on: June 12, 2007, 01:58:49 PM »

Quote from: Calvin on June 12, 2007, 01:19:27 PM

Kevin (I hope this isn't a derail). Earlier in this thread or in the last iteration you mentioned a series of books you thought I might like-pretty hardcore sci-fi, spaceships (naval battles in space types), intrigue, drama, all that good stuff (maybe a trilogy)-but I can't find it in a search or remember for the life of me. You also mentioned something else, maybe a trilogy about xeno-archaelogy on Mars? Looking for some casual books for later in the summer.

Xeno-archeology is almost certainly Jack McDevitt's The Engines of God.  Not on Mars, though- farther out int the solar system.  It is the beginning of a series but they are supposed to be pretty standalone.  So far I've only read the first one but I really enjoyed it.  McDevitt really does a good job at making it very mysterious and creepy.  Most importantly, to me, he keeps the characters recognizably human- a lot of sci-fi tends to extrapolate so many changes to people that it almost rips them of their humanity and makes it less accessible.  I"m very much looking forward to reading more of McDevitt's work.

For the first one (naval battles), I'm not 100% but I think it's probably the Night's Dawn trilogy by Peter F. Hamiton that starts with The Reality Dysfunction.  It's technically a trilogy but each volume was so huge when published in hardcover (1000+ pages) that each book was split into two paperbacks for the US release.  So it's six books over here.

Night's Dawn is an everything and the kitchen sink series- the scope is astonishing.  Dashing rogues, huge space battles, gritty ground action, fascinating technology, some horror stuff straight out of Stephen King, politics, and tons of sex (which gets to be a bit much after a while to be honest).  Took me a little bit to get into but once I did was *hooked* hard.  In fact I'm very seriously thinking about re-reading the series this summer. 
Logged
Calvin
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13895

President of G.R.O.S.S.


View Profile
« Reply #91 on: June 12, 2007, 02:02:48 PM »

That's perfect Kevin thanks. I have a ton of money in B&N gift cars because of my last CCs stupid reward points, so at some point before I move I am going to buy some books to read along the way-looking up these books now-and yes, I am pretty sure The Engines of God was the one mentioned before. Thanks! thumbsup
Logged
Kevin Grey
Global Moderator
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13976


View Profile
« Reply #92 on: June 12, 2007, 02:10:25 PM »

Oh yeah, and my latest read, of interest to people looking forward to the upcoming PC RPG The Witcher, is Andrzej Sapkowski's The Last Wish.  The Witcher game is based on the series of novels by Sapkowski featuring the character Geralt The Witcher.  The novels are enormously popular in the author's native Poland and are very well thought of by those able to either read Polish or other languages he's been translated to.  For the first time they are now translating his works into English.  The Last Wish is the first, and is an episodic novel (basically a series of short stories with a wrap-around story used as a framing device) that helps lay the ground work for the series proper (first one of which is called "Blood of the Elves").  Blood of the Elves is scheduled to be published in English in August 2008.  So far no plans to bring his works to the US but they can be easily obtained from Amazon UK.

Read the first story last night and I was pretty impressed.  He actually managed to make a king who impregnates his sister into a sympathetic character- no mean feat, especially in the confines of a short work.  Looking forward to reading the rest though I'll probably hold off for a bit because I am very excited for two novels that I have coming from Amazon today (Paragaea: A Planetary Romance and Rocket Science) that I've been chomping at the bit to read.
Logged
Kevin Grey
Global Moderator
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13976


View Profile
« Reply #93 on: June 12, 2007, 02:11:14 PM »

Quote from: Calvin on June 12, 2007, 02:02:48 PM

That's perfect Kevin thanks. I have a ton of money in B&N gift cars because of my last CCs stupid reward points, so at some point before I move I am going to buy some books to read along the way-looking up these books now-and yes, I am pretty sure The Engines of God was the one mentioned before. Thanks! thumbsup

You're welcome!  Hope you enjoy them. 
Logged
whiteboyskim
Senior Staff Writer
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 7848


Hard partier


View Profile
« Reply #94 on: June 19, 2007, 05:41:23 PM »

Finally finished off Make Love The Bruce Campbell Way which is a pretty funny, albeit awfully strange, book by Bruce "Don't Call Me Ash" Campbell on him getting into an A-list relationship film directed by Mike Nichols and what happens when the movie starts bringing in green screens, fight scenes, and ninjas. It's bizarre and more in line with what the Coen Brothers would cook up, but it was pretty fun nevertheless.
Logged

Behold the glory of my new blog!
Filmmaking is vision plus faith plus balls, all 3 of which Hollywood knows little about.
Caine
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 9838


My cocaine


View Profile
« Reply #95 on: June 20, 2007, 03:30:24 AM »

been on a sci-fi streak, started with some light, but great books from john scalzi

old man's war - campy war story ala starship troopers with a great premise and good humorous bits.
ghost brigades - ender's saga-esque premise with a bit of a philosophical "who am i" overture

i liked both of these and will be picking up the third when it hits paperback.  the universe he's created could be a great one for other novels.

century rain by alistair reynolds - picked up on a whim during a buy 2, get 1 free deal, and was happy i did so.  another author with a great ability to create the fantastic.

greg bear's
eon - first and best of "the Way" universe, imo. 
eternity
legacy
moving mars   

now i'm on to a bit of clive barker, reading cabal at the moment. 

Logged

"It's like chess with big guns against aliens. Which isn't like chess at all when I think about it." - Jake Solomon
Nth Power
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3451



View Profile
« Reply #96 on: June 20, 2007, 08:54:00 AM »

I finished : The Wounded and the Slain.



I didn't enjoy this one as much as the others I've read from the Hard Case Crime line.  Not all that bad, but it felt a bit unfocused and it was rather slow to get going. 

Logged

"Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities" -Voltaire
XBL gamertag: NthPowr
IkeVandergraaf
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2784


RRoD FTL! F MS!


View Profile
« Reply #97 on: June 22, 2007, 06:57:31 PM »

Just finished The Places In Between by Rory Stewart.



It's a travel memoir of a Scotsman who walks across Afghanistan immediately after the American invasion and fall of the Taliban.  Overall, very well written, but a little humorless and the author's attitude sometimes annoyed me.  Still, a good read.
Logged

Gamertag = IkeV
I KNOW DEEP IN MY NMIND THAT THIS DISGUSTING WEBSITE THAT IS OBIVOUSLY OPERATED BY HIGHSCHOOL DROPOUTS LIVING PURPOSELESS AND JOBLESS LIVES
Nth Power
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3451



View Profile
« Reply #98 on: June 30, 2007, 12:24:22 PM »

Finished The Sins of the Fathers by Lawrence Block. 
I give it a hearty thumbsup
Logged

"Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities" -Voltaire
XBL gamertag: NthPowr
IkeVandergraaf
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2784


RRoD FTL! F MS!


View Profile
« Reply #99 on: July 23, 2007, 07:21:21 PM »

Haven't updated in a while.  I have read:



Interesting



Recommended by Oprah and ATB.  Hmm, come to think of it, I've never seen them in a room together.

DEPRESSING!

and



I have commented in the appropriate thread.
« Last Edit: July 23, 2007, 07:24:58 PM by IkeVandergraaf » Logged

Gamertag = IkeV
I KNOW DEEP IN MY NMIND THAT THIS DISGUSTING WEBSITE THAT IS OBIVOUSLY OPERATED BY HIGHSCHOOL DROPOUTS LIVING PURPOSELESS AND JOBLESS LIVES
CeeKay
Gaming Trend Staff
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 71766


La-bibbida-bibba-dum! La-bibbida-bibba-do!


View Profile
« Reply #100 on: July 24, 2007, 12:31:24 AM »

I finally got around to reading a book this year!  Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows.  Now back to video game illiteracy.
Logged

Because I can,
also because I don't care what you want.
XBL: OriginalCeeKay
Wii U: CeeKay
Nth Power
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3451



View Profile
« Reply #101 on: July 24, 2007, 02:43:04 AM »

I've been lazy this month.  I finished Songs of Innocence.  The second of the John Blake novels in the HCC line and another winner.



Now, I'm trying to catch up on Harry Potter and an making it through Goblet of Fire.
Logged

"Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities" -Voltaire
XBL gamertag: NthPowr
unbreakable
Guest
« Reply #102 on: July 24, 2007, 02:52:04 AM »

I just blew through the TPBs of Ultimate X-Men, #14-16.

Ultimate X-Men is a pretty interesting riff on X-Men; one thing I like is how Xavier comes off as a bit of a shady and selfish person at times.  I think I even like the Ultimate version of Wolverine even more than the 'real' one (the Ultimate universe one is just like the movie one, in terms of origin and character).
Logged
Jag
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2379



View Profile
« Reply #103 on: July 24, 2007, 01:26:03 PM »

Just finished the last book in Richard Morgan's Kovacs Trilogy, Woken Furies. Series starts with Altered  Carbon. Very cool and original cyberpunk, military thriller, detective type series. The Envoys have to be one of the coolest concepts i've seen in Sci-Fi, part Super Solider/Commando and part Sherlock Holmes, these guys are just bad ass. smile
Logged
Calvin
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13895

President of G.R.O.S.S.


View Profile
« Reply #104 on: July 24, 2007, 02:12:40 PM »

Ike, one question: why are you still not reading the Jewish detective book? GET ON IT.
Logged
Calvin
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13895

President of G.R.O.S.S.


View Profile
« Reply #105 on: July 24, 2007, 02:17:55 PM »

Quote from: Caine on June 20, 2007, 03:30:24 AM

been on a sci-fi streak, started with some light, but great books from john scalzi

old man's war - campy war story ala starship troopers with a great premise and good humorous bits.
ghost brigades - ender's saga-esque premise with a bit of a philosophical "who am i" overture

i liked both of these and will be picking up the third when it hits paperback.  the universe he's created could be a great one for other novels.

century rain by alistair reynolds - picked up on a whim during a buy 2, get 1 free deal, and was happy i did so.  another author with a great ability to create the fantastic.

greg bear's
eon - first and best of "the Way" universe, imo. 
eternity
legacy
moving mars   

now i'm on to a bit of clive barker, reading cabal at the moment. 


Are any of these sci-fi books the hard-core naval battle in space gritty sci-fi kind? I am trying to find a few more to add to Kevin's suggestions. I am definitely getting Engines of God, but I am still debating his second suggestion (mainly because he said the books had way too much sex, and I think sex is the most godawful waste of paper in good books-and no, I don't have a really good reason why)-so do any of these fit the bill?
Logged
Jag
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2379



View Profile
« Reply #106 on: July 24, 2007, 02:30:40 PM »

Quote from: Calvin on July 24, 2007, 02:17:55 PM

Quote from: Caine on June 20, 2007, 03:30:24 AM

been on a sci-fi streak, started with some light, but great books from john scalzi

old man's war - campy war story ala starship troopers with a great premise and good humorous bits.
ghost brigades - ender's saga-esque premise with a bit of a philosophical "who am i" overture

i liked both of these and will be picking up the third when it hits paperback.  the universe he's created could be a great one for other novels.

century rain by alistair reynolds - picked up on a whim during a buy 2, get 1 free deal, and was happy i did so.  another author with a great ability to create the fantastic.

greg bear's
eon - first and best of "the Way" universe, imo. 
eternity
legacy
moving mars   

now i'm on to a bit of clive barker, reading cabal at the moment. 


Are any of these sci-fi books the hard-core naval battle in space gritty sci-fi kind? I am trying to find a few more to add to Kevin's suggestions. I am definitely getting Engines of God, but I am still debating his second suggestion (mainly because he said the books had way too much sex, and I think sex is the most godawful waste of paper in good books-and no, I don't have a really good reason why)-so do any of these fit the bill?

You read the Honor Harrington series? That's got some great, gritty sci-fi, naval style battles.
Logged
Calvin
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13895

President of G.R.O.S.S.


View Profile
« Reply #107 on: July 24, 2007, 02:40:29 PM »

I have not Jag-who is the author?
Logged
Kevin Grey
Global Moderator
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13976


View Profile
« Reply #108 on: July 24, 2007, 02:48:18 PM »

Quote from: Calvin on July 24, 2007, 02:40:29 PM

I have not Jag-who is the author?

David Weber.  Several books of the series (including the first) are available from the Baen Free Library

I tried to read the first Honor Harrington book about five years ago on a recommendation from someone and couldn't get through it.  Harrington felt way too Mary Sue-ish from thet get go for me.  But it's a pretty popular series. 
Logged
Kevin Grey
Global Moderator
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13976


View Profile
« Reply #109 on: July 24, 2007, 02:49:30 PM »

Quote from: Jag on July 24, 2007, 01:26:03 PM

Just finished the last book in Richard Morgan's Kovacs Trilogy, Woken Furies. Series starts with Altered  Carbon. Very cool and original cyberpunk, military thriller, detective type series. The Envoys have to be one of the coolest concepts i've seen in Sci-Fi, part Super Solider/Commando and part Sherlock Holmes, these guys are just bad ass. smile

Definitely check out Morgan's latest, Thirteen.  Other than a slow passage in the middle, it was outstanding.  I liked it a lot more than Woken Furies and would put it alongside Altered Carbon and Broken Angels (with undeniably stronger writing). 
Logged
Jag
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2379



View Profile
« Reply #110 on: July 24, 2007, 03:34:31 PM »

Quote from: Calvin on July 24, 2007, 02:40:29 PM

I have not Jag-who is the author?

Sorry, i just assumed, most people knew of it slywink

As KG said, it's by David Weber. It is a fun, easy read. Nothing too deep, but some good space opera. Here is the first book On Basilisk Station (Honor Harrington Book 1). You can read the Amazon comments to get an idea what its about.

I assume you've also read Ender's Game. If not, go grab it, now! smile

KG, i've heard about Thirteen, going to pick it up.
Logged
Calvin
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13895

President of G.R.O.S.S.


View Profile
« Reply #111 on: July 24, 2007, 03:36:03 PM »

Is Ringworld good stuff? I know, I know, how could I not have read that by now...but I haven't. Also very interested in any good sci-fi that might use Dyson Sphere's as a main plot element if anyone has any suggestions. If you guys want me to move the questions to another thread, please tell me.
Logged
Kevin Grey
Global Moderator
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13976


View Profile
« Reply #112 on: July 24, 2007, 04:00:44 PM »

Quote from: Calvin on July 24, 2007, 03:36:03 PM

Is Ringworld good stuff? I know, I know, how could I not have read that by now...but I haven't. Also very interested in any good sci-fi that might use Dyson Sphere's as a main plot element if anyone has any suggestions. If you guys want me to move the questions to another thread, please tell me.

Check out this wikipedia article on Dyson Sphere's in fiction:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyson_spheres_in_fiction

Lots of good recommendations in there.  I haven't read Peter F. Hamilton's (guy referenced above with Night's Dawn Trilogy) Pandora's Star/Judas Unchained yet, but it's referenced there.  Alistair Reynolds is referenced and he's pretty hot stuff in the sci-fi community right now. 

Other top tier current sci-fi authors mentioned in there are Ian Banks and Dan Simmons. 

While I haven't read most of the works that are specifically referenced as involving Dyson Spheres, I've read other works from them and they're really talented authors. 
Logged
Calvin
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13895

President of G.R.O.S.S.


View Profile
« Reply #113 on: July 24, 2007, 04:03:20 PM »

There are two or three Alistair Reynolds books that catch me eye every time I go into the bookstore, so I will definitely check out some of his stuff soon Kevin-are you a fan? I think there was one called Pushing Ice was considering on Amazon today actually. Also, that Altered Carbon stuff you mentioned above sounds reall good.

Thanks for the link KMG.
Logged
unbreakable
Guest
« Reply #114 on: July 24, 2007, 04:13:58 PM »

Quote from: Calvin on July 24, 2007, 03:36:03 PM

Is Ringworld good stuff? I know, I know, how could I not have read that by now...but I haven't. Also very interested in any good sci-fi that might use Dyson Sphere's as a main plot element if anyone has any suggestions. If you guys want me to move the questions to another thread, please tell me.

It was alright.  I liked the first and second books in the series, but the second ended kind of weird, and past that it seemed not too interesting.  Some of the Man/Kzin Wars books were the same way, kind of hit or miss.

You could also check out the one series from Arthur C Clarke, Rendezvous with Rama.  Rama was a really good book, but many people have said it gets really bad after that (I took their advice and stopped after the first book).  Which, in my experience, has been kind of true with much of what Clarke writes (2061 was especially terrible, as was Cradle).
« Last Edit: July 24, 2007, 04:22:35 PM by unbreakable » Logged
Kevin Grey
Global Moderator
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13976


View Profile
« Reply #115 on: July 24, 2007, 04:15:57 PM »

I've read about half of Reynold's first novel, Revelation Space.  He's got some really fascinating ideas but it didn't grab me at the time. Supposedly his second novel, Chasm City, is a huge step up and really awesome.  I own that one but my reading backlog is nothing short of monstrous but I'll get to it someday.  I think almost all of Reynolds novels are part of a series so you have to be careful which book you enter with.  I've heard that Revelation Space, Chasm City, and his latest, The Prefect, are all good entry points.  I"m not sure if Pushing Ice is a standalone or not. 

Definitely check out Altered Carbon.  Or jump right in with Thirteen since it's not directly related to the Altered Carbon series.  Fair warning though- Morgan is is just as obnoxious as Hamilton with his sex scenes. 
Logged
Jag
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2379



View Profile
« Reply #116 on: July 24, 2007, 05:11:45 PM »

Quote from: Kevin Grey on July 24, 2007, 04:15:57 PM

Fair warning though- Morgan is is just as obnoxious as Hamilton with his sex scenes. 

Yeah, i'm not used to seeing graphic sex in my sci-fi that much, so it threw me off at first, but he doesn't use it gratuitously at all, so really isn't bad at all.
Logged
Kevin Grey
Global Moderator
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13976


View Profile
« Reply #117 on: August 01, 2007, 02:24:07 PM »

Finished up Red Seas Under Red Skies, Scott Lynch's follow-up to his outstanding debut, The Lies of Locke Lamora (for you Final Fantasy fans, the lead character is named after a certain memorable character from FF6).  Very enjoyable but not as good as the first one IMO.  This one just seemed to lack bite- tonally it was more PG-13 than the hard R that the original was.  With the first book, Lynch did an outstanding job setting Locke and Co. up against some fantastic villains and putting them in over their head to the point where you couldn't imagine how they could get out of it.  Then he played fair and made them play a pretty dramatic price in blood for their victory.  Unfortunately, this feeling was kind of absent in Red Seas for the most part.  Still, a lot of fun, and I'm very much looking forward to the next book in the series, The Republic of Thieves.  Also, there isn't nearly enough pirate fiction out there so Red Seas scores on that point alone. And Lynch continues to do some of the more memorable world building out there.  Someone in the videogame industry really needs to pay the guy to consult on world design. 
Logged
Kevin Grey
Global Moderator
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13976


View Profile
« Reply #118 on: August 05, 2007, 10:27:49 PM »

Just finished Patrick Rothfuss's highy praised debut The Name of the Wind and, boy, I can see where the praise came from.  I loved it.  It's kind of pointless to even mention the story because it's so typical fantasy (yet still well executed).  But Rothfuss can write.  He just sucked me into the story, characters, and setting. 

This is one I would recommend for anyone dismayed about the end of Harry Potter- It's not Young Adult by any means (though it doesn't share the excessive grit and darkness so much in vogue in many new fantasy series) but it shares many thematic similarities as well as even a few plot similarities to Rowling's saga but Rothfuss makes it all his own. 

The only quibble I have with the book is that the ending is anticlimactic.  It's the first of a trilogy and Rothfuss doesn't make much effort to make the finale particularly rousing.  It's more of an arbitrary stopping point.  But it's heartening to know that he had the entire trilogy finished when he got the publishing deal so each installment will be out annually. 
Logged
ATB
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 15310


Thanks for everything, Ryan. 1979-2013


View Profile
« Reply #119 on: August 06, 2007, 02:56:59 AM »

I just finished Calvin and Hobbes Complete.  Approximately 1200 pages, so figure there were probably words for a 300 pg novel slywink.

I give it an A++++++.  It took me back to a time when life was simpler and re-opened my eyes as to how brilliant Watterson was.  To think that this comics were funny when I was a young boy through my teens and that they're still funny now as a 32 year old- man, what genius.

I'll probably revisit in another decade. thumbsup thumbsup
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.233 seconds with 103 queries. (Pretty URLs adds 0.109s, 2q)