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« Reply #40 on: September 25, 2006, 03:40:59 PM »

Quote from: Kevin Grey on September 20, 2006, 03:00:06 PM

Quote from: Jag on September 20, 2006, 02:56:54 PM

I couldn't get into the first book of William's Memory, etc. Maybe i should give it second shot.

Takes a good 200 pages or so to get going.  I love those first 200 pages, but it turns a lot of people off. 

I loved the insanity that Simon "Mooncalf" goes through while trying to find his way out of the catacombs... it adds personality to a staple of a cliche'd fantasy setting.
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« Reply #41 on: September 25, 2006, 03:47:44 PM »

Yeah, the catacombs stuff is the breaking point for a lot of people but I agree that it was necessary to bring the experience to the reader. 

The catacombs stuff in TGAT, on the other hand, was perhaps a bit much. 
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« Reply #42 on: September 25, 2006, 03:53:29 PM »

nod TGAT was 1650 pages. *It* was a bit much.
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« Reply #43 on: September 25, 2006, 04:07:45 PM »

Thought of another one.. very humorous, light reading for those days you are just too tired or frazzled to handle "brainy" stuff. I have read a ton of books like that due to my memory problem - and the fact that I was reading after working all night.  :icon_eek:

Anyone here discover the author Dallas Murphy, usually found in the Mystery section?  Apparently I read his third Artie Deemer mystery, "Don't Explain" - the two others are "Lover Man" and "Lush Life" which I'm not sure if I read.  I thoroughly enjoyed whichever ones I read,  lol - what is not to love about a guy with a dog named Jellyroll and a pool shark girlfirend?

OMG I can't believe I didnt think of Carl Hiaasen - if you want to laugh out loud, be intrigued, and occasionally mystified, try one of his novels.  They can be a bit graphic for the squeamish, but not terribly so.  Just an example:  "In Hiaasen's Native Tongue, we are introduced to another fanatical environmentalist character, Skink. Skink lives in what is left of the wilderness in Florida. He has a glass eye and dines on road kill. He usually sports an orange jumpsuit with a flowered shower cap on his head. Much to the reader's surprise, Skink is actually "Clinton Tyree, the former governor of Florida, a man who was elected for his war-hero record and move-star smile."  Skink was run out of office for being the "one thing that the state's power structure could not absorb: an honest man."(Salon.com).

He also wrote Strip Tease, Stormy Weather, Tourist Season, and many more.  icon_cool
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« Reply #44 on: September 25, 2006, 04:29:24 PM »

Hugo Chavez recommends Noam Chomsky's Hegemony or Survival.   saywhat
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« Reply #45 on: September 26, 2006, 01:54:55 AM »

If you need a break from fantasy/sf and want to try some suspense fiction

"A Drink Before the War" by Dennis Lehane Description & Reviews @ Amazon

"Darwin's Blade" by Dan Simmons (of the Hyperion series) Description & Reviews @ Amazon

"All Fall Down" by Lee Gruenfeld Description & Reviews @ Amazon

These are three of my favorite non-fantasy/sf books of all time. The first is brilliantly well written. The other two aren't quite up to the same level of writing, but the subject matter is so interesting they're worth reading, imho.

P.S. Careful when reading the reviews @ amazon, some are chock full of spoilers.
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« Reply #46 on: September 26, 2006, 02:44:15 AM »

Since Mytocles mentioned Carl Hiaasen, I have to throw in Tim Dorsey.  He has been likened to "Carl Hiaasen and Elmore Leonard on crack".  He weaves many threads through a book filled with dark, satiric humor and over-the-top violence.  The protagonist of most of his (loosely tied together) books is a sociopathic mass-murdering Florida history buff named Serge, usually accompanied by his drug-addled idiot of a best friend Coleman.  Dorsey isn't for everybody, but if you're in the mood for some dark lunacy definitely give him a try.
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« Reply #47 on: October 04, 2006, 11:02:45 PM »

Quote from: whiteboyskim on September 20, 2006, 04:31:19 PM

The chinatown Death Cloud Peril.

It came out this summer and I picked it up then. Fantastically entertaining read about New York in the 1930s during which time a few pulp fiction writers get involved in a mystery right out of their own books. It involves everyone from the man who wrote "The Shadow" to H.P. Lovecraft to Ron Hubbard (yes, that one) and so forth. Wonderfully fun reading and the rug gets pulled out from under you with the sheer audacity of one character's true identity. I laughed my head clean off when I found out who it was. Great, fun book with a classic prose style.

So I just finished this one up tonight and it was awesome.  One of the best books I've read in a long, long time.  Paul Malmont just jumped onto my list of "buy whatever he writes sight unseen." 

Re: the character's true identity- are you referring to
Spoiler for Hiden:
Who the narrator of the book was?
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« Reply #48 on: October 05, 2006, 01:55:02 PM »

Quote from: EngineNo9 on September 26, 2006, 02:44:15 AM

Since Mytocles mentioned Carl Hiaasen, I have to throw in Tim Dorsey.  He has been likened to "Carl Hiaasen and Elmore Leonard on crack".  He weaves many threads through a book filled with dark, satiric humor and over-the-top violence.  The protagonist of most of his (loosely tied together) books is a sociopathic mass-murdering Florida history buff named Serge, usually accompanied by his drug-addled idiot of a best friend Coleman.  Dorsey isn't for everybody, but if you're in the mood for some dark lunacy definitely give him a try.

I started reading the Tim Dorsey series, but the graphic violence hit a little close to home being in Fla and all. Not something for a light bedtime read. I like his writing, but i'm not a fan of 'realistic' violence. I get that from the news.

Back to Bryson, i'm making an effort to read most of his books. A Walk in the Woods was great! I'm on Notes from  a Small Island, all about his last walkabout in England. As an anglophile(sp?) and someone who studied in England this book gets extra high marks from me.
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« Reply #49 on: October 05, 2006, 06:12:09 PM »

I just finished "Walk in the Woods" and was motivated to pick up both "I'm a stranger here myself" and "Notes from a Sunburned Country". I very much look forward to ready more from him. He has a way of describing people and things that are both exceptionally true and funny.
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« Reply #50 on: October 05, 2006, 06:29:22 PM »

Bob Woodwards new book is looking like the next one I pick up.
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« Reply #51 on: October 06, 2006, 02:29:17 AM »

Quote from: Jag on October 05, 2006, 01:55:02 PM

I started reading the Tim Dorsey series, but the graphic violence hit a little close to home being in Fla and all. Not something for a light bedtime read. I like his writing, but i'm not a fan of 'realistic' violence. I get that from the news.

Sorry to hear that you didn't dig Tim Dorsey.  Out of curiosity, which one did you try reading? 

I recently finished Anansi Boys and enjoyed it, although for some reason it seemed to loose steam for me towards the end.  I had previously read American Gods and Good Omens and have just started on Neverwhere. 

The newest Terry Pratchett book, Thud!, was excellent, as always. 
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« Reply #52 on: October 06, 2006, 03:05:25 PM »

Quote from: EngineNo9 on October 06, 2006, 02:29:17 AM

Quote from: Jag on October 05, 2006, 01:55:02 PM

I started reading the Tim Dorsey series, but the graphic violence hit a little close to home being in Fla and all. Not something for a light bedtime read. I like his writing, but i'm not a fan of 'realistic' violence. I get that from the news.

Sorry to hear that you didn't dig Tim Dorsey.  Out of curiosity, which one did you try reading? 

I recently finished Anansi Boys and enjoyed it, although for some reason it seemed to loose steam for me towards the end.  I had previously read American Gods and Good Omens and have just started on Neverwhere. 

The newest Terry Pratchett book, Thud!, was excellent, as always. 

I started the series at book 1 and stopped at 3, can't remember the name, Hammerhead Ranch Hotel, i think. It is enjoyable, but the graphic description of killing and casual murder in South Florida is too much for me. I'm not squeamish, but sickos like this actually exist and i don't like reading about them as 'anti-heroes'.

BTW, Neverwhere was a bit bizzare, but enjoyable.
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« Reply #53 on: October 06, 2006, 03:08:57 PM »

Quote from: Kevin Grey on October 04, 2006, 11:02:45 PM

Quote from: whiteboyskim on September 20, 2006, 04:31:19 PM

The chinatown Death Cloud Peril.

It came out this summer and I picked it up then. Fantastically entertaining read about New York in the 1930s during which time a few pulp fiction writers get involved in a mystery right out of their own books. It involves everyone from the man who wrote "The Shadow" to H.P. Lovecraft to Ron Hubbard (yes, that one) and so forth. Wonderfully fun reading and the rug gets pulled out from under you with the sheer audacity of one character's true identity. I laughed my head clean off when I found out who it was. Great, fun book with a classic prose style.

So I just finished this one up tonight and it was awesome.  One of the best books I've read in a long, long time.  Paul Malmont just jumped onto my list of "buy whatever he writes sight unseen." 

Re: the character's true identity- are you referring to
Spoiler for Hiden:
Who the narrator of the book was?

Actually I was referring to Otis. icon_wink

This book definitely has it all for me, and Malmont deserves credit for not taking the easy way out of several situations he threw his characters into. I dug many of the reveals, especially the full story on how the Lotus War ended, and that you had to figure out the cowboy's last name to get the joke. Very fun stuff all around, and Malmont also earned a free pass with me as well.
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« Reply #54 on: October 06, 2006, 03:14:50 PM »

Ah, Otis.  Unfortunately his identity as well as the cowboy's (which was still pretty obvious) was spoiled for me by a link on Malmont's own site.  Not too big a deal, though.  He obviously did a lot of research though and just reading through the wiki on several of these people backed up most of the details he put in the book.  Really remarkable job of fitting in all these real characters and situations into a single, tight fictional plot. 

The book inspired me to pick up Max Allen Collins' (author of Road to Perdition) "The War of the Worlds Muder" which has Gibson trying to clear Orson Welles of a murder that occurs on the same night of his legendary broadcast.  Haven't actually started reading it yet, though. 
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« Reply #55 on: November 01, 2006, 03:00:31 AM »

Over the weekend I finally finished up The Chinatown Death Cloud Peril.  It was well worth reading--and inspired me to track down a Doc Savage book from the library. 
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« Reply #56 on: November 01, 2006, 03:53:50 PM »

Depending on what your interest is:
Historical Fiction:
Anything by David Nevin but 1812 and Eagle's Cry and fabulous
The Shaara's shared set of books
Morgan Llywelyn if you have Celtic roots or interests
Herman Wouks Winds of War and War and Rememberance
Once an Eagle
Leon Uris
Stephen Pressfield novels, Last of the Amazons, Gates of Fire

Fantasy  or SCi-Fi
David Weber...especially the Honor Harrington series
Stephen R. Donaldson's Gap series ...somone already mention the Covenant series which is great
Charles DeLint for urban fantasy....Moonheart is an amazing book but I have not read a bad DeLint book
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« Reply #57 on: November 01, 2006, 04:58:25 PM »

Quote from: Qbe on November 01, 2006, 03:00:31 AM

Over the weekend I finally finished up The Chinatown Death Cloud Peril.  It was well worth reading--and inspired me to track down a Doc Savage book from the library. 

Now I'm glad I brought this book up here since so many people are getting a kick from it. icon_biggrin
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« Reply #58 on: November 01, 2006, 08:54:53 PM »

I'm just about to finish Ishmael, a very fascinating read.  It's a novel about religion, a different perspective about world history, and where the world is headed... narrated by an ape.  Very interesting and makes you think about the state of the world.  There are some frightening valid points brought up in the book.  Very much recommended.
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« Reply #59 on: April 06, 2008, 03:29:37 AM »

gratch, couple of questions...

Did you ever get through Memory, Sorrow and Thorn?

Also, I've just finished the Sword of Truth, and other than the last few chapters in Confessor (the final book), the preachiness was there but not overt. That being said, Confessor was an easy, compelling read.
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« Reply #60 on: April 06, 2008, 03:44:26 AM »

Quote from: Purge on April 06, 2008, 03:29:37 AM

gratch, couple of questions...

Did you ever get through Memory, Sorrow and Thorn?

Never did, unfortunately.  Got about 2/3 of the way through the second book, and simply got bored.   Here's how much of an impression they made on me:  I read over 1,000 pages in that series less than 1 1/2 years ago, and for the life of me, I couldn't tell you a single plot point or character name that I remember.  That's never happened before.  frown

Quote
Also, I've just finished the Sword of Truth, and other than the last few chapters in Confessor (the final book), the preachiness was there but not overt. That being said, Confessor was an easy, compelling read.

One of these days, I might give it another shot.  Unfortunately, the last one I read "Naked Empire" left such a sour taste, that it will be hard to get back into it.  Why can't he just write a series about Gratch?  slywink

Over the last few months, I've been on a 'modern classics' kick.  You know, all those books you've either been meaning to read forever, or read back in an English lit class in high school then forgot about.  So far, I've gotten through:

-  Farenheit 451
-  1984
-  Lord of the Flies
-  Brave New World
-  The Hobbit
-  Ender's Game
-  Neuromancer
-  Catcher in the Rye (currently reading)

Ender's Game and Neuromancer's status as 'classics' is debatable, but I've always heard them tossed around as standards in the genre.  So I though they'd be worth a shot.  It's been pretty amazing catching up on some of these, and has really rekindled my desire to read.  Kinda cool, actually.
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« Reply #61 on: April 06, 2008, 04:13:47 AM »

Aw. I thought this was a new thread.

I was getting pumped to unveiled my "Recommendations" series.
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« Reply #62 on: April 06, 2008, 04:28:29 AM »

Quote from: Tebunker on October 05, 2006, 06:12:09 PM

I just finished "Walk in the Woods" and was motivated to pick up both "I'm a stranger here myself" and "Notes from a Sunburned Country". I very much look forward to ready more from him. He has a way of describing people and things that are both exceptionally true and funny.

I know this is about 2 years old, but I'm gonna respond anyway. I also love Bill Bryson. My first book by him was The Mother Tongue: English and How it Got that way. I highly recommend it.  Next to that, my favourite is Notes from a Small Island. And consequently, I'm actually reading A Walk in the Woods at the moment, but while good, I'm finding it quite tame compared to his others. Doesn't seem as inspired and the humour isn't really there.

Get this though. Notes from a Small Island got voted as the book that best represents the UK. He's a highly respected figure in England, where he's been appointed President of the Campaign to Protect Rural England, because he highly respects the culture and the old buildings and hates to see modern architecture get in the way of that when there really is no need for it. He was also appointed Chancellor of Durham University, succeeding Peter Ustinov. Big shoes to fill, that guy, hehe. But it must be quite an honour.

Anyway, check out his Wikipedia page. Very interesting:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Bryson

I'd love to get my hands on the miniseries based on Notes from a Small Island.
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« Reply #63 on: April 06, 2008, 06:40:04 AM »

The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism

Or, if you are looking for some fiction, I highly, highly, highly recommend everyone read Watchmen.  And if anyone likes Batman in any form, they should also get The Dark Knight Returns.  Two of the greatest graphic novels ever made.
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« Reply #64 on: April 06, 2008, 01:49:29 PM »

Some of you might like www.goodreads.com  or www.librarything.com  for reading reviews and reading "networking".  I know they helepd me a bunch.
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« Reply #65 on: April 08, 2008, 10:52:51 PM »

Quote from: the Nightbreeze on April 06, 2008, 01:49:29 PM

Some of you might like www.goodreads.com  or www.librarything.com  for reading reviews and reading "networking".  I know they helepd me a bunch.

Are you on the OO group in Librarything?
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« Reply #66 on: April 09, 2008, 02:06:46 PM »

Honestly I look books up on Amazon. The reviews are good overviews of what the general public thinks of a book. I'm sure there are better and more comprehensive review sites out there, but Amazon is quick and easy.
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« Reply #67 on: April 09, 2008, 03:51:17 PM »

Quote from: ATB on September 13, 2006, 06:27:30 PM

The Three Muskateers. Unabridged.  Pure brilliance.

I just finished listening to the book on CD version. Only 20 CD's. The voice acting adds an element of excitement to the actions scenes. The single voice actor did a good job of creating the distinct personalities between the three Musketeers.

Spoiler for Hiden:
I thought it was ridiculous how quickly Felton betrays The Count de Winter. After being told repeatedly that Milady de Winter can't be trusted and would use any method to corrupt him he still allows himself to be seduced in a matter of days.

Quote from: Purge on September 18, 2006, 03:26:57 PM

I found the Bio of a Space Tyrant a little slow as it is a political series more than an action series. I don't recall getting through all of them either.
I remember reading this as a kid. It was kind of silly how he kept a parrallel for Earth politics continued when people expanded into the solar system: Arabs took over the mineral rich planet of Mercury while the Americans took over the large planet of Jupiter. I seem to recall a lot of sex and violence in the series.
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« Reply #68 on: April 09, 2008, 04:51:35 PM »

Quote from: stiffler on September 13, 2006, 09:34:00 PM

Bill Bryson's A Short History of Nearly Everything

One of the more entertaining books I've read in a long time...
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« Reply #69 on: April 09, 2008, 08:34:58 PM »

Quote from: CSL on April 08, 2008, 10:52:51 PM

Quote from: the Nightbreeze on April 06, 2008, 01:49:29 PM

Some of you might like www.goodreads.com  or www.librarything.com  for reading reviews and reading "networking".  I know they helepd me a bunch.

Are you on the OO group in Librarything?

I don't have a Librarything or an OO profile.  Or if I do, it is to say that I haven't input anything on them in years and wouldn't know how to log back into them.  I have a GoodReads profile becaues they just let you go nuts with profile space, no restrictions or subscriptions like other "netlibrary" sites.  I barely read and post on GT enough to make it worth using it, to be honest.  OO and GT are good sites, but I don't often have much to say that someone hasn't put out there first.
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