http://gamingtrend.com
April 20, 2014, 06:26:30 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: My first time wearing glasses  (Read 658 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
TiLT
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 6028


Preaching to the choir


View Profile WWW
« on: January 24, 2013, 09:12:25 AM »

So, after years of increasingly frequent bouts of headaches, sore and red eyes, and general exhaustion, I finally went and got myself a pair of glasses. Turns out I'm long sighted, probably from birth. My eyes have been compensating for this my entire life (most likely), which means my eyesight has been good enough to fool me into thinking my eyes were fine. In fact, when I was in the army, a sight test showed that I had 25% better vision than the norm (whatever that means). The trouble only started as I grew older. I'm 33 now, and my eye muscles are no longer able to keep up the charade. Cue new glasses.

I got them yesterday after work and wore them the entire evening. It was a bizarre experience. My eyesight got crystal clear, revealing just how bad my vision had become (which is probably not that bad overall compared with those who have real problems with their vision). In addition, I lost all depth perception, and I've got the classic trapezoid syndrome where my computer screen looks wide at the bottom and thin at the top. I'm hoping these are just part of an adjustment period my brain has to go through. After all, I have to relearn how to view the world. I've probably seen depth through varying grades of blurriness, but now that everything is clear it feels like just about everything within 5-10 meters is right next to my face. I feel like a dwarf when I walk since the ground seems so close, and everything is at an angle. Removing my glasses makes the world turn really blurry now, so my eyes are clearly adapting.

Anyone else have similar experiences when starting out with glasses? How long did it take for you to adjust?
Logged
Bullwinkle
Gaming Trend Staff
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 15163


Watch me pull a rabbit outta my hat.


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2013, 12:34:06 PM »

I can't recommend vision therapy enough, and it sounds like you may need it, Tilt.  Unfortunately, your eyes have been doing the wrong thing for so long, it may be an uphill battle to adjust.

My daughter was starting to get behind in her reading.  We blamed it on a teacher (and still put some of the blame on that teacher, because she was pretty awful), but her eye doctor noticed that she wasn't tracking right.  So she would get to the end of a line on a page and would have to readjust to start the next line.  This took time on every single line and would sometimes have her skip a row, which would add even more time.

We started vision therapy a few months ago.  She has a half hour session twice a week and practices once a day for 5 minutes or so.  They are already saying she should be done with VT early, and she just jumped 4 reading levels at school. 

Honestly, it's been a revelation, but at the beginning it seemed like a hell of a lot of time (and money).  We had a couple of moments where we weren't sure it would be worth it.  I can't even believe that now.
Logged

That's like blaming owls because I suck at making analogies.
Knightshade Dragon
Administrator
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 20973



View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2013, 12:35:45 PM »

It's been too long since I wore glasses to remember if it was like that, but I can tell you that it's the same way with Lasik.  I spent a good month going "Look!  look!  Honey, I can read X from here!"  I'm sure she was ready to jab me in the eye with a pencil after a short while. 
Logged

Ron Burke
EiC, Director of Gaming Trend
Gamertag:
Gaming Trend
PS3 Tag: GamingTrend
TiLT
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 6028


Preaching to the choir


View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2013, 12:44:36 PM »

I've never had any trouble reading (I read plenty of books at a good pace), not even when wearing the glasses, and I'm too young for Lasik. My glasses are meant for use with computers and reading, so I'm not supposed to be wearing them when I'm doing something else. I'm nearly done with work for today, and things have been getting better. The trapezoid syndrome is less pronounced, and my depth perception isn't throwing me completely off.

For the record, my eyesight isn't horrible at all. It's a small thing that has had a long time to do damage.
Logged
ATB
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 15024


Thanks for everything, Ryan. 1979-2013


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2013, 01:12:52 PM »

Lasik is your answer.  Best money I've spent in my life.
Logged
TiLT
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 6028


Preaching to the choir


View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2013, 01:23:47 PM »

Quote from: ATB on January 24, 2013, 01:12:52 PM

Lasik is your answer.  Best money I've spent in my life.

I don't need to fix my daily vision. I see just fine without glasses, even when reading or looking at the computer monitor. It's the long term muscle strain that kills me, so I'm using these glasses to help my eyes relax. If I took Lasik at my age, I'd just have to do it all over again in a few years since my eyes are still developing. It's a waste of money for me at this point, and not something I'm going to do.
Logged
wonderpug
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 10993


hmm...


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2013, 02:08:25 PM »

I just used contacts for a bunch of years in a row, and then I decided I also wanted a pair of glasses again so I could switch back & forth. I put on the new glasses and it was almost like I was looking through a funhouse mirror. Straight ahead, it looked fine, but toward the edges there was an extreme curvy distortion. The straight line of a wall edge would take a parabolic curve. It was crazy enough it made me a little dizzy, and I went back to the optometrist to tell him something was horribly wrong.

He told me it was just the adjustment period, and he was right. I just used the glasses for small stretches of time for a while, and I think after just a week the effect was less pronounced. I dot remember how long it took for it to go away completely, but now I can't see any curvy distortion even if I try.
Logged
Teggy
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 8450


Eat lightsaber, jerks!


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2013, 02:15:46 PM »

I started wearing glasses for distance at 18 I think (freshman at college). I can't remember if I had any issues, but I'm sure yours will go away, and if not, just stop back in at the optometrist.

I kind of like having glasses - you can get another pair you like and it is just part of your fashion.
Logged

"Is there any chance your jolly Garchomp is female?" - Wonderpug
Destructor
Special Project Group
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 15845


▲▲▼▼◄►◄►B A Start


View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2013, 02:45:50 PM »

I'm extremely nearsighted (I can focus on things that are no more than a foot away from my eyes - everything past that is varying bits of blur), and I remember that every time I got my prescription changed over the years, it takes a day or two for my eyes to get used to seeing the world differently yet again.

What you reported will go away in a day or three at most, TiLT. As said, yes, if it doesn't clear up, head back to your doctor.
Logged

"All opinions posted are my own, and not those of my employers, who are appalled."
Bullwinkle
Gaming Trend Staff
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 15163


Watch me pull a rabbit outta my hat.


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2013, 03:28:51 PM »

Just wanted to point out that vision therapy is not just for fixing problems you have reading.  That was specific to my kid.  They fix all kinds of issues by training you eyes to do the things they're meant to do. 

It's especially effective when your eyes have been doing the wrong thing for years, which it sounds like is the case with you, Tilt.
Logged

That's like blaming owls because I suck at making analogies.
Ironrod
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3306



View Profile WWW
« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2013, 08:59:09 PM »

I've worn glasses since I was in first grade. Can't imagine living without them.

Normally I change my prescription every 2-3 years, but a lengthy bout of unemployment and poverty compelled me to wear my last pair for over 5 years. By the time I got them replaced, my Rx had changed quite a lot -- for the better. My old Rx was actually overcorrecting my vision as my eyesight had improved. It took about a week to adjust to the new Rx, as it always does.
Logged

Curio City Online - Weird stuff you can buy
Curious Business - The Curio City Blog
Scuzz
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 1700



View Profile
« Reply #11 on: January 24, 2013, 10:00:31 PM »

Quote from: Bullwinkle on January 24, 2013, 03:28:51 PM

Just wanted to point out that vision therapy is not just for fixing problems you have reading.  That was specific to my kid.  They fix all kinds of issues by training you eyes to do the things they're meant to do. 

It's especially effective when your eyes have been doing the wrong thing for years, which it sounds like is the case with you, Tilt.

My daughter took vision therapy for her dyslexia, and it did help.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.147 seconds with 47 queries. (Pretty URLs adds 0.054s, 2q)