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Greg Wak
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« on: June 11, 2016, 05:19:55 PM »

So I'm thinking about getting one but I'm not sure how I would organize things. Would I move my OS over to the new drive? How difficult is that to do. And should it just be my OS or my OS and my current game. Obviously not room enough for all my games. Or should I leave my OS on the regular HD and just have my current game on the OS? Asking for opinions.
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TheAtomicKid
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« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2016, 12:04:24 PM »

I currently use a 1TB mushkin reactor as a games volume. Finally got tired of the limited space on my dual raid0 setup. Still have the first raid as boot, but replaced the games volume a couple or three months ago. tons of space now... more after I make more modifications.... the reactor will, (probably) eventually get consigned to 'general storage'... aka anime, downloads, tax receipts, etc

But before that can happen, I need a new, actual, games drive... been eyeing a samsung 950 pro, or somesuch, but undecided atm. Tbh, after a point, you won't notice the speed as much. Having a system setup with a boot drive and a dedicated game volume, already makes a ton of difference. Even more so if you have enough ram you can ditch the paging file (a different subject)

And, eventually, I'll replace the boot raid. I don't really need a giant drive for that.... but a quick one, that's better at random access and small files. Games, on the other hand, mostly tend to be long periods of nothing, followed by loading tons of texture files, then more long periods of nothing... so a drive that excels at that is theoretically better.

If you're running a single drive system, my recommendation... get yourself a small? fast, ssd, and make it your boot drive. dedicated your existing hard drive to your game volume. You'll gain a ton of responsiveness, both in games, and in general usage. You can add a large ssd later, when/if your game drive dies on you, or you just get tired of having moving parts biggrin

(small = 240 GB or so... you'll use about half that on your windows install... get a bigger drive if you want, future usage, less wear, etc)

Remember, like a hard drive, if you fill up an SSD, it slows down a LOT... also, you get more wear on the drive as it starts trying to move stuff around, delete currently unused cells to make room for new writes, etc. Basically, don't fill up your ssd, it's no bueno.

Atomic

PS: More physical nand literally means more ability to write data to the drive, if you worry about such things. Because the controller literally has more nand to spread the writes across before having to repeat.

http://www.thessdreview.com/  (good place to check reviews)
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Greg Wak
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« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2016, 04:29:32 PM »

Thank you AK for the good advice as always. So what are the best steps to proceed? This will probably seem stupid, but I have never done anything like this. I assume I have to take the OS(7pro) off of the existing drive and then reinstall from the CD onto the SSD? Am I close?
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TheAtomicKid
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« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2016, 10:39:58 PM »

I've never done it before, but someone else here might be able to advise you on cloning the primary drive to the ssd. After that, it's a matter of tweaking the installaion.

If you WANT to reinstall, then your way forward is clear biggrin

You're still in the free upgrade period for windows 10. I've upgraded my primary box at this point, and other than microsoft being extremely interested in my personal information, no problems. There are guides around for putting the clamp on that stuff... and it's a lot, be warned. But the OS is running smoothly... I like the new explorer.exe, for instance.

Anyways, you don't need to 'upgrade'... just download an install from microsoft (I prefer installing from USB, much faster), and leave the security key blank at install, assuming that still works. Disconnect the old windows boot drive so as not to confuse anything, and install clean to the ssd. Once you're sure you're happy, THEN you let it have your windows key.

If you want to upgrade, I'd recommend cloning your installation first, then upgrade the cloned copy.

If you want to remain with win7, which is perfectly viable, either clone or clean install, your choice. I definitely recommend disconnecting the old windows drive if you're clean installing, though, it saves on confusion. Once you're installed, you can re-add the drive (check bios for boot order, be sure you're booting the correct drive!), then do whatever you want with the drive.

Atomic
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TheAtomicKid
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« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2016, 10:53:11 PM »

You might want to take a peek at some options for your new boot ssd, and list what you're interested in here. I'll try to get back promptly with recommendations.

These are all standard SATA connector units... aka hard drive replacements.

Intel 730 series... (480 GB) not the fastest, but fast, and very reliable. Focus is more on small files, and consistency in performance, so should be optimal for a boot drive. (to be honest, good for either)

Sandisk Extreme Pro... very fast, 10 year warranty!

Samsung 850 Pro... very fast, 3d nand if it makes a difference...

Three that I would consider, with real consideration for the first two.

If you're not going to buy a 'super' ssd for the boot drive... consider the mushkin reactor I picked up for my temporary games volume. It's not the fastest thing in the world, but it's fast enough, and they're extremely light on the wallet. Got mine at a fairly common sale price of 209$ for the 1TB unit.

There's also NVMe and U.2 units, with NVMe becoming very common... but unless your system is setup for those, there are steps before you can use one, and booting from one might be impossible. (it might be possible if your bios can boot an add-in card, and your solution is 'smart' enough)... I'm not advising this one, as I haven't even attempted it myself.

Atomic
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Greg Wak
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« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2016, 06:34:03 PM »

I think if I just want the OS on it the Intel 730 240GB should be fine, Yes?
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Punisher
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« Reply #6 on: June 19, 2016, 07:02:16 PM »

I will say that if you are up for it, a clean install is better than a clone. Over time Windows gets all messy and a nice clean install helps. I generally try to do one every 2 years give or take.
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Greg Wak
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« Reply #7 on: June 19, 2016, 09:19:05 PM »

punisher, that idea always scares me. Only time I ever do a clean install is when something breaks icon_biggrin  Or this last time when I actually built my own rig. That was fun! Until the MOBO drivers that came on the DVD from ASUS were corrupted and loaded then turned off all of my USB's. Considering my keyboard and mouse are USB it took me a while to figure out how to get back in to fix it.
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TheAtomicKid
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« Reply #8 on: June 19, 2016, 09:44:06 PM »

Quote from: Greg Wak on June 19, 2016, 06:34:03 PM

I think if I just want the OS on it the Intel 730 240GB should be fine, Yes?


edit: Actually, it would be more than fine. Sytem/boot drives aren't drastically affected by write speed... there are some writes, to be sure, and there's always installations, but outside of that it's mostly small files, which the intels are perfectly good at...and you get 'intel quality'... my boot volume consists of 2 x25-m/160's, and they're still going strong.


It would be fine, though the 240 GB version isn't the fastest... might consider the sandisk or the samsung instead. (the intel write speed drops significantly between the 480 and the 240 versions)

Atomic

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820167190&ignorebbr=1&cm_re=intel_730-_-20-167-190-_-Product

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820171998&ignorebbr=1&cm_re=sandisk_extreme_pro-_-20-171-998-_-Product

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820147360&ignorebbr=1&cm_re=samsung_850_pro-_-20-147-360-_-Product
« Last Edit: June 19, 2016, 11:01:15 PM by TheAtomicKid » Logged
Punisher
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« Reply #9 on: June 20, 2016, 05:48:01 PM »

Quote from: Greg Wak on June 19, 2016, 09:19:05 PM

punisher, that idea always scares me. Only time I ever do a clean install is when something breaks icon_biggrin  Or this last time when I actually built my own rig. That was fun! Until the MOBO drivers that came on the DVD from ASUS were corrupted and loaded then turned off all of my USB's. Considering my keyboard and mouse are USB it took me a while to figure out how to get back in to fix it.
It can definitely be scary if you are not used to it. I've been in IT for over 20 years so it's old hat now, but I can definitely see a difference in performance. I know some people that will do a nice clean install, update Windows and all drivers, then make an image of the PC if they need a clean install later on..
If you make sure to download and save the network card and video card drivers prior to the clean install it helps a lot. With those 2 you can get online and download other things you need and also look online for help.
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