http://gamingtrend.com
November 27, 2014, 08:05:34 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Can a complete newb build his own rig? *Final Update*  (Read 4095 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Xmann
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2632

Ironman in training


View Profile
« on: November 08, 2005, 01:11:02 AM »

I'm in the process of buying new components for my new system and i was throwing the idea around of putting this thing together myself.
The thing is i have never done anything like this before.  I have installed plenty of video cards and a power supply, but thats it.  Usually a buddy of mine does anything more than that for me.  But if it can be done without screwing something up, i'd like to learn to do this myself.
I know the common sense answer is sure i can do it.  But for someone who is not good at putting anything together, i dont want to get frustrated.
So whats the suggestions?  Are there any really good step by step guides in laymen terms for putting a system together?  My system will include a new mobo, processor, psu, video card, and ram.
Logged

Hazer
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 20


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2005, 01:37:28 AM »

Generic answer: Yes and No.

Honesty:

You could if you follow one golden rule:  It's Brain Surgery with Legos.

Delicate work (everything you'll be handling is Electrostatic Sensitive) but it's mostly Tab-A-Into-Slot-B work. Read the manuals, read the lables and above all make sure you don't force things to go together until you're 180% sure that it's SUPPOSED to fit together like that. Some pieces do require a bit of force to connect (putting a VidCard into an AGP slot for example), but most don't require too much effort. If you're pushing on something too hard, back off a second and double check that you're putting the right bits together.
Logged

Ragnarok Online taught me everything I needed to know about conflict resolution:  "There are no problems that can't be solved by proper application of Daggers to Faces."
stiffler
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 4071


View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2005, 02:35:29 AM »

I always found the hardest part is putting the heatsink on the CPU.  Some of them are horribly complicated and require way more force than I am comfortable applying.

Other than that, I've really found it to be quite easy to do.  Getting comfortable with the idea seems to be the most difficult thing for most people.  I admit that, even having built numerous systems, I am always nervous as hell when I do it.  A lot of delicate and easy to screw up stuff.

Oh, and make sure you mount the mobo standoffs properly.  That and discharge all your static and you should be fine.  Hopefully no strange hardware gremlins show up.

Thinking on it some more, my best advice is this:  Select two motherboards you REALLY like.  Something popular and out a few weeks hopefully.  Then do a search in Google Groups (the newsgroups, not the websearch) for the particular motherboard.  There are specific newsgroups for the bigger mobo makers and you should read all you can about them.  Any problems (and workarounds) should reveal themselves.
Logged

Xbox Live Gamertag: cstiffler
Thin_J
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3409


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2005, 08:56:25 AM »

Ditto on the hardest part being the stuff involving the cpu/mobo/heatsink.

The rest of it is cake.
Logged

Xbox Live: Thin J
PSN: Thin_J
DamageInc
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2412


Starts with s and ends with litting their throats


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2005, 10:53:42 AM »

I agree:

Tech difficulty is putting the CPU and heat sink into the MOBO, and not because your mind won't grab the concept because it is not different that putting a puzzle piece into a puzzle.

What will be hard is knowing that if you F it up, then you just lost what ever $$ you spent. CPUs are very fragile. Break a pin off because you were not careful and patient, say goodbye to $200 to $900 depending on which one you purchased.

The other difficulty may be hooking up the wire leads for the power, reset, LEDs and USB ports. If you can read a basic electronics schematic then you'll be fine. Sometimes the schematic differs from what the manual states. So it is important to read the MOBO to make sure it matches up.

The only other issue that is technically difficult is after you have assembled everything. You need to be able to troubleshoot any problems that may occur.

Tom' Hardware site has some good tips if you are looking for third party help.

http://www.tomshardware.com/howto/index.html

Just be patient, take your time, and use an anti-static strap.
Logged

The freaks come out at nine and it's twenty to ten
Thin_J
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3409


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2005, 12:21:21 PM »

Quote from: "DamageInc"
use an anti-static strap.


A swa?

I've built 3 pc's, never had any issues with static yet, but I wouldn't mind having just a little more assurance in the coming weeks since Im' building my first home-built rig in about 5 years. Give us some details on this anti-static strap you speak of.
Logged

Xbox Live: Thin J
PSN: Thin_J
Mystic95Z
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 536


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2005, 02:01:49 PM »

I just upgraded my P4 based pc last friday to a A64 system and I have to say putting on the OEM heat sink was a breeze compared to past endeavors....
Logged
DamageInc
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2412


Starts with s and ends with litting their throats


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2005, 04:19:42 PM »

Its just a grounding strap that you can pick up at stores like Comp USA.  One side connects to a wrist strap and the alligator clip clips to the case.

It will minimize the chance of ESD damage to components, but many people do not use the.
Logged

The freaks come out at nine and it's twenty to ten
Hazer
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 20


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2005, 04:33:23 PM »

Quote from: "DamageInc"
Its just a grounding strap that you can pick up at stores like Comp USA.  One side connects to a wrist strap and the alligator clip clips to the case.

It will minimize the chance of ESD damage to components, but many people do not use the.


I used to carry one full-time. Strap on my wrist and the lead either coiled in my pocket or coiled around my keychain (which hung from a belt loop)
Logged

Ragnarok Online taught me everything I needed to know about conflict resolution:  "There are no problems that can't be solved by proper application of Daggers to Faces."
Thin_J
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3409


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: November 08, 2005, 11:35:52 PM »

*edited*

Nevermind, found one!

Thanks for the heads up. Can never be too careful when you're handling a $200 processor.
Logged

Xbox Live: Thin J
PSN: Thin_J
DamageInc
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2412


Starts with s and ends with litting their throats


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2005, 11:47:52 PM »

Also, touch your hands to the power supply before touching any components. This will help to discharge any static you already have.

Some of this is anal and overkill, but like you said it's a $200+ CPU.
Logged

The freaks come out at nine and it's twenty to ten
Mystic95Z
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 536


View Profile
« Reply #11 on: November 09, 2005, 01:12:33 AM »

Quote from: "DamageInc"
Also, touch your hands to the power supply before touching any components. This will help to discharge any static you already have.

Some of this is anal and overkill, but like you said it's a $200+ CPU.


Just make sure that its still plugged in or it wont make any difference, else discharge yourself on something thats stillplugged in.
Logged
Creepy_Smell
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 652

Load"*",8,1


View Profile WWW
« Reply #12 on: November 09, 2005, 02:46:33 AM »

I built my first rig years back after only installing a video card and maybe a HD. I just read about it a lot on and read the manual too. Only difficulty I had was that the memory wanted to be in a specific slot to boot which took me some time since I didn't think it was that. Why not build it but have a knowledgeable friend watch or be on call?
Logged

Xmann
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2632

Ironman in training


View Profile
« Reply #13 on: November 09, 2005, 12:22:34 PM »

Thanks for all the responses.  I'm still unsure what i'll do.  The only thing that really concerns me is screwing something up and wasting a couple hundred $$ that i dont have to replace.  Might just let my buddy do it again and say forget it.  That'll be the easiest thing to do.
Logged

DamageInc
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2412


Starts with s and ends with litting their throats


View Profile
« Reply #14 on: November 09, 2005, 12:26:21 PM »

Just have your buddy guide you through it that way you'll learn and be able to do the next one on your own  biggrin

There is far less chance of messing something up if you have someone guiding you.
Logged

The freaks come out at nine and it's twenty to ten
unbreakable
Guest
« Reply #15 on: November 09, 2005, 09:41:23 PM »

Best deal for a first-time builder is a Shuttle XPC.  About the only thing you need to do is insert the RAM and CPU (and maybe the video card, depending on which XPC you go with).

The main important thing about the CPU- get some contact paste (Arctic Silver is a good choice), and apply it according to the directions.  Having air between the CPU and heat sink will act as an insulator, defeating the whole reason you have a heat sink (meaning, the air will prevent the heat sink from cooling the processor).

Other than that, yeah, its all LEGOs.
Logged
Mystic95Z
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 536


View Profile
« Reply #16 on: November 09, 2005, 11:38:23 PM »

Quote from: "unbreakable"
Best deal for a first-time builder is a Shuttle XPC.  About the only thing you need to do is insert the RAM and CPU (and maybe the video card, depending on which XPC you go with).

The main important thing about the CPU- get some contact paste (Arctic Silver is a good choice), and apply it according to the directions.  Having air between the CPU and heat sink will act as an insulator, defeating the whole reason you have a heat sink (meaning, the air will prevent the heat sink from cooling the processor).

Other than that, yeah, its all LEGOs.


One note to add to that is if you use an OEM HSF, be sure to remove the stock thermal pad before applying the Arctic Silver.

-Tony
Logged
Hazer
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 20


View Profile
« Reply #17 on: November 10, 2005, 12:12:39 AM »

For the love of GOD be careful with *ANY* thermal interface material (TIM) that you use.

Some of the older stuff (I don't know if it's still in production or being shipped) was silicone based and would turn into cement over time (much hate during the 486 / Pentium days).

If you use too much it's like you've used none at all. It will wind up insulating and over heating.

The Stock HSF assembly with the stock TIM is sufficient for *MOST* applications. People who tell you you *NEED* to have Artic Silver or something similar are a little misguided (IMO). The processor is tested for use with what's supplied and in most cases using a non-standard HSF or going with a 3rd party TIM will void warranty on certain pieces. If you're not overclocking the box and you're using it in a reasonable environment (room doesn't get above ~78, you have adequate ventilation around the box) then you can use the standard HSF/TIM combo.

Now, I will admit that I'm using an Intel motherboard with an Intel Processor and a copper Thermaltake HSF assembly with AS5 for the TIM. I can't overclock on the board (Intel doesn't let you do that anymore) and my room is generally a little cool... However I also attend A-Kon where my PC is subjected to a room that would be considered 'chilly' if it got as low as 80 degrees. slywink Think about the How/When/Where of the PC's life. If the room it's in gets a little warm in summer, make sure you account for that. Maybe you need an extra case fan or 2 for air flow or maybe you need the better quality HSF assembly... don't just blindly buy and assemble any computer.
Logged

Ragnarok Online taught me everything I needed to know about conflict resolution:  "There are no problems that can't be solved by proper application of Daggers to Faces."
unbreakable
Guest
« Reply #18 on: November 11, 2005, 09:03:25 AM »

I never got into the whole overclocking thing.  I value stability too much.  And besides, the last thing I want to do after working with computers all day is... come home and fix my computer.  I'm getting to the point where if it isnt simple, I don't feel like dealing with it.

And actually, I really like those little 'pads' you put between the heatsink and fan, but it's easier to find the tube stuff (for me anyway).  I've actually used dielectric grease on one rig because I didnt have anything else handy.  It's still going after years with no problems (in fact I'm using it right now since my main rig's CPU fan died).
Logged
Xmann
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2632

Ironman in training


View Profile
« Reply #19 on: December 02, 2005, 08:37:26 PM »

ok i have all my parts here and i'm still unsure what to do.  my buddy who could help me is busy and out of town for the next month so i'd have to wait a month to get this thing together.
so anyone have a link to a good step by step newbie guide?  or any other suggestions?
Logged

DamageInc
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2412


Starts with s and ends with litting their throats


View Profile
« Reply #20 on: December 02, 2005, 09:42:28 PM »

Pretty good info, but you may have to check out multiple links

http://www.extremetech.com/category2/0,1695,644478,00.asp
Logged

The freaks come out at nine and it's twenty to ten
Thin_J
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3409


View Profile
« Reply #21 on: December 03, 2005, 07:02:14 AM »

Quote from: "Xmann"
ok i have all my parts here and i'm still unsure what to do.  my buddy who could help me is busy and out of town for the next month so i'd have to wait a month to get this thing together.
so anyone have a link to a good step by step newbie guide?  or any other suggestions?


I just finished my build a few days ago. It's been ages, and things are ever-so-slightly different, but really if you look at the parts, cables, etc, you'll start to realize there's only one place all of them can go.

But I will say one thing, if you only read one manual for the entire build, make it the motherboard manual. There's lots of good (read: Important) information in there about jumpers and stuff.

I think the worst part of the whole thing was when I realized I'd forgotten to hook up all the cables from the front face of the case to the motherboard until after I'd installed everything else.

On my DFI motherboard the pins you attach your power, reset, and some other cables like the front USB port connections to are all down at the very bottom of the board. Once you've installed two huge-ass video cards and a sound card there's not exactly room for your hand down there. I had to hold a mini-maglite with my teeth so I could see while I attached the cables to the pins with a pair of needle-nose pliars.

It was not fun.

Totally worth it though:
Logged

Xbox Live: Thin J
PSN: Thin_J
DamageInc
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2412


Starts with s and ends with litting their throats


View Profile
« Reply #22 on: December 03, 2005, 11:04:02 AM »

Very nice, looks clean inside
Logged

The freaks come out at nine and it's twenty to ten
Xmann
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2632

Ironman in training


View Profile
« Reply #23 on: December 03, 2005, 02:45:22 PM »

ok i think i've worked up the nerve to give this a shot.  only thing i haven't done is bought one of those anti-static wrist bands.  should i grab one of those just to be safe?
also, i have a retail cpu so i dont need any of that artic sliver correct?

here is my components, let me know if you suspect any difficulties

AMD athlon 64 3500 Socket 939 retail
SAPPHIRE Radeon X800PRO PCI-E
GIGABYTE GA-K8N Pro-SLI Socket 939 NVIDIA nForce4
ENERMAX Whisper II ATX12V 535W PS
CORSAIR 512MB X2 184-Pin DDR 400

And i'm just keeping my current Maxtor harddrive.  What you think?  Anything else i'm missing?
Logged

Soulchilde
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 5291


You and I have unfinished business


View Profile
« Reply #24 on: December 03, 2005, 03:03:27 PM »

If you just keep touching your case or frame to dsicharge any static then the ASW strap isn't required.   Its your choice


Good Luck with your build
Logged

Quote from: Devil on January 12, 2007, 01:14:38 AM

NiM$
wonderpug
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 11526


hmm...


View Profile
« Reply #25 on: December 03, 2005, 03:42:28 PM »

If you want to skip the CPU installation step, just buy one of the CPU/motherboard bundles from mwave, and they'll install and test the CPU for a whopping $9.
Logged
Gedd
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 340


View Profile
« Reply #26 on: December 03, 2005, 04:10:49 PM »

Quote from: "Xmann"
also, i have a retail cpu so i dont need any of that artic sliver correct?


Correct. You should have a heatsink with thermal pad in the box.
Logged
Thin_J
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3409


View Profile
« Reply #27 on: December 03, 2005, 05:55:11 PM »

Quote from: "Gedd"
Quote from: "Xmann"
also, i have a retail cpu so i dont need any of that artic sliver correct?


Correct. You should have a heatsink with thermal pad in the box.


In the case of the 3500, which is the CPU I have in my new box, there's a layer of thermal paste already applied to the bottom of the heatsink. You just take off the plastic cover on the bottom of the whole thing and you're ready to install it on top of the CPU.

Quote from: "DamageInc"
Very nice, looks clean inside


Well sort of. The way it is now it would actually make some of the more cable-management-obsessed people I know have a coronary just looking into it. It's easily better than my old mini-tower though smile
Logged

Xbox Live: Thin J
PSN: Thin_J
frost
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 479



View Profile
« Reply #28 on: December 04, 2005, 03:13:22 AM »

what's a good mobo from the list provided there with that processor (one that will allow for overclocking the processor)?
Logged
stiffler
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 4071


View Profile WWW
« Reply #29 on: December 04, 2005, 03:25:02 AM »

Quote from: "frost"
what's a good mobo from the list provided there with that processor (one that will allow for overclocking the processor)?


Why do you want to overclock the processor?  I mean besides the obvious.  It just doesn't seem necessary these days unless you are trying to liquid cool a Celeron or something.
Logged

Xbox Live Gamertag: cstiffler
Thin_J
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3409


View Profile
« Reply #30 on: December 04, 2005, 07:56:39 AM »

Quote from: "frost"
what's a good mobo from the list provided there with that processor (one that will allow for overclocking the processor)?


My DFI nF4 SLI-DR board has tons upon tons of overclocking options, though I have no use for them.

There's a new model of it available now, the nF4 SLI-DR Expert, that has even more refined and more reliable overclocking options. I read a pretty glowing review of it recently.

As for my non-expert SLI board, it's been rock solid so far.
Logged

Xbox Live: Thin J
PSN: Thin_J
Xmann
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2632

Ironman in training


View Profile
« Reply #31 on: December 23, 2005, 12:08:05 PM »

Well i spent a few hours at my buddies house with him assisting me and what do you know...IT's DONE!
The assembling was a piece of cake.  The difficult part was getting the software side to run smoothly after everything was installed.  If not for him i would have been in deep doo-doo.
Bottom line, this thing rocks!  AMD 3700 is incredible.  Running CoD2 and Quake 4 full out without any hick-ups.
Bottom line, yes a newbie can do it.  With a tad bit of help!
Logged

DamageInc
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2412


Starts with s and ends with litting their throats


View Profile
« Reply #32 on: December 23, 2005, 12:44:33 PM »

Nice job! Good luck with the new rig!
Logged

The freaks come out at nine and it's twenty to ten
Gedd
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 340


View Profile
« Reply #33 on: December 23, 2005, 02:10:49 PM »

Congratulations X. smile
Logged
frost
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 479



View Profile
« Reply #34 on: December 23, 2005, 04:55:44 PM »

all said and done, what did it cost you to build the rig, X?
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.128 seconds with 93 queries. (Pretty URLs adds 0.031s, 2q)