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Author Topic: [4th Edition D&D] H1 - Keep on the Shadowfell  (Read 37022 times)
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IceBear
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« Reply #200 on: June 13, 2008, 11:21:59 PM »

Quote from: ScubaV on June 13, 2008, 10:57:34 PM

It will be interesting to see if in the future they add supplemental rules that loosen up the class roles.  I'm thinking of WoW here.  In vanilla WoW, warriors only tanked, priests and druids only healed, etc.  In BC, with the talent and skill revamps, warriors can tank or dps, priests can heal or dps, druids can do all 3, and they can all be effective in their chosen roles.  If 4e is going to emulate MMO's, hopefully they can follow this idea as well.  Have the suggested class roles in place to help newbies, but also allow experienced players to specialize and mold their classes into whatever niche they want.

Considering there's a whole book on Martial Powers coming in the fall (at least I believe that's when I heard it's coming) I'm pretty sure that's going to be the case.  I think the Monk might be in that one too.
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Hemlock Bones
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« Reply #201 on: June 19, 2008, 06:39:35 PM »

The 4E SRD is out.
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IceBear
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« Reply #202 on: June 20, 2008, 02:32:04 AM »

Right, but the 4E SRD is nothing like the 3E SRD - you can't use it to play the game it's just for people planning on releasing 4E products to use to know how to format and what is and isn't allowed.
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IceBear
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« Reply #203 on: June 20, 2008, 11:35:10 AM »

More kobolds and some tactics information in the latest Dragon article:

http://www.wizards.com/dnd/files/dragon/364_Creature_Incarnations.pdf
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« Reply #204 on: June 20, 2008, 12:09:20 PM »

Very neat article.  Thanks!
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« Reply #205 on: June 20, 2008, 02:42:42 PM »

I used troll's templates from the link earlier in this thread along with the Magic Set Editor, and created full color power cards for all my players. I also ordered some card sleeves. Eventually I'm going to print these out on photo paper, stick them in the card sleeves, and create a backing card. They look awesome! Too bad Wizards can't come up with a set like that (maybe sell them in decks by class). I think they would sell like hotcakes.
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« Reply #206 on: June 20, 2008, 02:55:10 PM »

Quote from: Lockdown on June 20, 2008, 12:09:20 PM

Very neat article.  Thanks!

I love # 12 on the Kobold Victory Chart!  And I love that a Kobold Victory Chart exists!
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« Reply #207 on: June 20, 2008, 03:36:37 PM »

Quote from: YellowKing on June 20, 2008, 02:42:42 PM

I used troll's templates from the link earlier in this thread along with the Magic Set Editor, and created full color power cards for all my players. I also ordered some card sleeves. Eventually I'm going to print these out on photo paper, stick them in the card sleeves, and create a backing card. They look awesome! Too bad Wizards can't come up with a set like that (maybe sell them in decks by class). I think they would sell like hotcakes.

I'm pretty sure they will be doing something like that.  If you look at podcast 23 (video podcast) you'll notice everyone at WotC seems to have slips of paper with their powers on it that they put aside when they use them.  Since they are using cards in their own game I'm pretty sure they will try selling power cards at a later date.
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kadnod
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« Reply #208 on: June 24, 2008, 01:37:16 PM »

Rules Compendium is on-line:

http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/insider/compendium

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« Reply #209 on: June 25, 2008, 03:39:34 AM »

Any more game sessions to pass on Yellow King? Its fun to hear about how your sessions are going.
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YellowKing
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« Reply #210 on: June 25, 2008, 12:17:48 PM »

Well, last week's session was pretty interesting.

I decided to throw a non-combat session in to mix things up a bit. Because Keep on the Shadowfell is largely combat encounter after combat encounter (it's designed to level characters, after all), you have to get creative with the downtime between battles.

First thing was first - my party made it to Level 2 (actually they were just 45xp shy, but I just gave it to them for a spectacularly well-played game so far). That was exciting for everyone because they got new utility powers, some nice bumps to their stats, and a new feat.

Then I threw a wrench in the works. Note - this is not a spoiler because this does not actually occur in the official module, I made it up! When the party got back to town after their most recent battle, they found out that one of the major NPCs that had been giving them all sorts of information was found murdered in his home! This really threw them for a loop, because they depended on this guy to basically steer them in the right direction. I think it also brought home that what they were up against was serious about not being stopped.

Of course they wanted to go investigate the crime scene for themselves, so this is where I set up a skill challenge. I basically divided the NPC's home into several rooms, then allowed them to do Perception checks in each room. For each "success" they got a clue to the murderer's identity, based on forensic evidence. For instance, in the bedroom where the murder took place, they successfully made a group skill check and found a singed mark on the wall with a few strands of long brown hair stuck to it. (They correctly deduced the attacker might be a woman due to the hair length, and they should be on the lookout for someone with singed hair or trying to cover their hair with a hood). Each room held a vital clue, but they were only allowed to search a room once. In the end they wound up finding 3 out of the 6 possible clues, which was enough to give them a good start but not quite good enough for them to 100% identify the murderer. (If they had correctly discovered the identity of the murderer, I had plans to have them actually try to capture/kill them - as it was, they has a pretty good idea but also had a couple of red herrings confusing the issue. ) Ultimately their somewhat heavy-handed tactics around town trying to find the person led to the murderer getting spooked and leaving, but again with some nice roleplaying on my players' parts they discovered the escape and attempted to follow the killer's trail.

This excursion outside the town wall's led directly into the next encounter in the official module, so we jumped back into the "real" storyline from there. My plan is to bring back the murderer later in the campaign, or perhaps even save them for another module as a returning "villain." The thing I learned from this session is that skill challenges can be just as tense and entertaining as combat encounters. There is some uncertain math at this point (analysis of skill challenge difficulty ratings as outlined in the books shows they tend to be either far too difficult or far too easy depending on party level), so I made up my own DCs with what I thought was reasonable. Given the party's 50% success rate, I think I was pretty spot on. The biggest key to skill challenges I think is that failure in a skill challenge shouldn't equal a negative penalty. The party should still be able to move on even if they fail everything, and that's what I tried to do. Overwhelming success would certainly have made their job *easier*, but overwhelming failure certainly wouldn't have made it impossible - even one clue out of the six, if found, could have potentially led to the appropriate suspect, and if they found none then - oh well, sometimes criminals get away!

Next week we're really getting into the heart of the module, so I'm really looking forward to it. We're expecting some good old-fashioned dungeon crawling which will probably take us a few more weeks to finish up.

« Last Edit: June 25, 2008, 12:19:44 PM by YellowKing » Logged
Arnir
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« Reply #211 on: June 25, 2008, 05:49:42 PM »

Sounds like a fun experience for all.  It looks like your group is lucky having you as a DM.
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« Reply #212 on: June 25, 2008, 06:26:03 PM »

Quote from: Arnir on June 25, 2008, 05:49:42 PM

Sounds like a fun experience for all.  It looks like your group is lucky having you as a DM.

+1. The GT group is screwed.
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YellowKing
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« Reply #213 on: June 25, 2008, 07:03:54 PM »

Quote
Sounds like a fun experience for all.  It looks like your group is lucky having you as a DM.

Thanks, but I've got TONS of room for improvement. I seriously have not DMed in probably 15 years; this was my first foray back into it, so I was very rusty. Things have been going smoother as time goes on, but the first few sessions were occasionally rough, and I still sometimes paint myself into a corner when I break away from the official module. My wife is particularly devious - she loves identifying plot holes and such, so when I get creative I have to be *very* careful or she will expose any unpreparedness on my part.

Just a funny example; initially I described the NPC as apparently being murdered in his sleep - his body found in bed, blood pooled around, etc. However, I later mistakenly talked about how his room was trashed and there appeared to be signs of a struggle. My wife, of course, pipes up, "Wow, he was fighting back pretty hard for a guy that was asleep!" I squeaked by with some nonsense about the body being posed in bed after the fact, but it was a close call.  icon_biggrin On the other hand, she is new to D&D so she can be remarkably clueless about fantasy worlds. She was the one who suggested they check under the dead NPC's fingernails for DNA evidence. I had to calmly explain that in medieval fantasy worlds, DNA testing had not been invented yet.  icon_lol
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« Reply #214 on: June 25, 2008, 10:27:40 PM »

Good stuff, keep it coming!
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« Reply #215 on: June 26, 2008, 02:18:37 AM »

From what a friend says though, too much of the powers and spells are purely combat focused.  Did you run into any of these problems when you ran this non-combat campaign?  I mean, the wizard didn't have anything resembling a forensics spells available.
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« Reply #216 on: June 26, 2008, 10:39:50 AM »

Quote from: Turtle on June 26, 2008, 02:18:37 AM

From what a friend says though, too much of the powers and spells are purely combat focused.  Did you run into any of these problems when you ran this non-combat campaign?  I mean, the wizard didn't have anything resembling a forensics spells available.

There are a lot of utility powers that give bonuses on skill checks, and a lot of the skills are beefier now.  There is no detect magic spell anymore, for example, but you can detect magic with the Arcana skill.  Also, everyone that makes that complaint about the powers and spells seem to forget the ritual section of the player's handbook.  A lot of the useful utility spells from prior editions - speak with the dead, for example - are now rituals.  As sucky as it is, there is a limit to the size of a book, so I'm sure that even more rituals and powers will be released later that will improve this issue even more, but right now I don't see a problem running non-combat encounters like the one YK did using the core books using skill challenges.  As YK mentioned, skill challenges need to be addressed on a case by case basis by the DM as they have some math issues as written (though the ones in the latest Dragon article seem ok). If my players complained about the lack of spells, it doesn't look that difficult to take whatever 3E utility spell that they wanted to use and turn it into a ritual.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2008, 10:43:34 AM by IceBear » Logged
YellowKing
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« Reply #217 on: June 26, 2008, 03:05:29 PM »

Yeah, I think people are getting too hung up on the idea that because the PHB doesn't explicitly talk about a certain non-combat situation, then that situation is no longer possible. That is definitely not the case. The rules as written are very flexible, and give the DM a lot of leeway as to how to handle an event. In many cases these non-combat events that used to be handled with spells can be decided through skill challenges, skill checks, or pitting some stat against another stat (for instance, an NPC's bluff vs. my character's Insight for me to tell if he's lying or not). I'm sure supplements going forward will continue to "flesh out" non-combat situations, but in the meantime it's certainly possible for a decent DM to express the situation using the current rules in a fair manner.

And as Icebear pointed out, rituals have really become a catch-all for spells outside the scope of combat and common utility. While there are some limitations (ritual book size, requiring spell components, longer casting time), they are still there and the rules certainly allow a creative DM to create their own to fill in any gaps.
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« Reply #218 on: July 06, 2008, 03:51:10 PM »

Another update on the continuing saga of KotS!

The next big thing we wanted for our gaming sessions was a nice dry-erasable battle map. Unfortunately the nice Chessex ones were a little too expensive for our meager gaming budget. So we came up with another idea. I printed off a 30x36 grid on our plotter at work using http://incompetech.com/graphpaper/. One of our players then purchased a 30x36 piece of thin plexiglass. We put the grid on the table, slapped the plexiglass on top, and boom - we had a nice dry-erase gridded gaming surface that worked *spectacularly*. We even started finding new uses for it other than simply drawing maps - players were making notes in front of them as to status effects they had ongoing, etc. And for large battles with lots of minions, instead of using tokens we'd simply write a minion number down (M11, M13) directly on the grid and "move" them around by erasing and redrawing. This really helped me as DM keep track of each individual monster (we play a more realistic version in which every single creature gets its own initiative - the rules specify you can move minions all on the same initiative roll, but we thought that unfair since that would enable instances in which a dozen minions could swarm and gang up on one character.)

I can't stress enough how much the battle grid sped up our gaming session. We ended up playing a nice 6-hour session and the players got through 5 fairly complex encounters during that time. I've really enjoyed this module - I think years down the road looking back it could very well be seen as a classic. They did a great job of incorporating almost every D&D staple into one easy to run but engaging adventure. We're trying to hurry and finish it up before the next module (Thunderspire Labyrinth) hits later this month. In a nice touch, KotS drops some clues that tie in to Thunderspire Labyrinth, so players will feel like the two adventures are connected looking back on them.

Now that we've been through probably a dozen combat encounters, I'm still continually impressed how well they gave players the illusion of being very powerful while still maintaining a decent challenge level. Almost every fight as a DM I figure my players will have a cakewalk, and I end up surprised at how touch and go it often turns out to be. It's particularly noticeable now that we're getting into more challenging environments with much more varied creature types. That one healing surge per encounter that seems so powerful at Level 1 is small potatoes when you're up against a monster that can negate it with one normal attack. And even the rogue's massive damage output can seem woefully inadequate when up against some of the more powerful solo and boss mobs. That's my fair warning to all you Level 1 players out there - just because you're not in danger of dying in one shot like in previous versions of D&D, don't expect that feeling of invincibility to last forever!

 
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« Reply #219 on: July 06, 2008, 03:59:47 PM »

Yeah, I've had a battlemat for years, but since I normally play at someone else's house and I wanted to keep the amount of stuff I was carrying around to just one bag I got a lot of these flipmats from Paizo:

http://paizo.com/store/gameAids/gamingMats/steelSqwire

Unfortunately, it looks like they are out of the basic one until August.  I use the basic one all the time now for my dungeons (it's not as big as my battlemat, but we were actually finding my battlemat too big for our table (7 players and 1 DM eats up a lot of real estate) and I have accidentially used the wrong kind of marker on my battlemat enough times that I like the flipmat's ability to use almost any kind of marker), and the Tavern and Ship one have been great for whenever I needed a generic ship or tavern.

Have you been listening to the Penny Arcade podcast where they are playing a heavily modified version of KotS with Chris Perkins and James Wyatt (two of the designers?)  I think they too had the impression they were invulnerable and now they are quickly learning they are not.  I liked the last session (Episode 6) where most of them were down to single digit or low-teen hit points.  The cleric used a couple of healing powers and got the fighter from 8hp to 35hp.  The very next turn the fighter took 28hp.  Honestly, from hearing the state of the last podcast (most of the monsters still alive, players have used most of their encounter and daily powers, and the amount of hitpoints they have left) I don't know how they're going to survive (but since I know there's two more podcasts I guess they will).
« Last Edit: July 06, 2008, 04:06:06 PM by IceBear » Logged
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« Reply #220 on: July 06, 2008, 05:06:46 PM »

I ran Keep up to the first "boss" for some friends yesterday.  The folks who had played earlier versions of D&D loved the new rules, since combat went so much faster.  Our newbie player picked up things quickly and was doing just as well as the old-timers by the end of the session. I really enjoyed running it, too.  Combat was much more dynamic than previous editions.  PCs dropped below zero HPs several times, only to get back up again when the cleric tossed a heal their way.  It was nice seeing that magic-using PCs could throw a spell nearly every turn now, too.  Plus the on-line compendium made looking up rules ridiculously easy.

I still get some of the complaints about the new edition vs. older ones, but 4th is just a blast to play.  I really look forward to running it a few more times and finishing up Keep.
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« Reply #221 on: July 22, 2008, 12:51:41 PM »

I've played through the first two encounters in this scenario, and so far, so good.  My gaming group is slow, and we can only play for a few hours one night a week, and as such, we are only getting through an encounter a session.  Last night was very fun, though, as I saw the players finally starting to think a bit more strategically.  I was most impressed with the jumps that my wife made playing the cleric, buffing the right people at the right time for the most good.  However, I did have to kibbitz a bit with her when our paladin dropped to below zero, and she tried to do a healing strike and failed...they thought it was curtains.  I had to point out to her that Healing Word was a minor action, so she could do that in addition to her standard action.  Some of them haven't quite grasped the use of 3 actions in a round.

The one question that I couldn't find an immediate answer for...the Dragonshield Kobold's ability to shift in reaction to a character moving adjacent to them.  The question that arose...the paladin moved 3 squares to engage a Dragonshield, and the DS shifted away from him.  The paladin still had movement points left, so he asked if he could continue moving after him.  I couldn't find a rule for it, and didn't want to take time away to look it up, so I said sure.  So he moved forward again, and the DS shifted away again.  Wash, rinse, repeat.  It was a little frustrating for the the paladin, but he took it in stride.  So my question is, did I handle this one right?  After the intial engagement, could he keep moving?  And could the DS keep shifting?  Any opinions?
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« Reply #222 on: July 22, 2008, 04:26:56 PM »

I think their special ability is considered a Minor Action, and as such they can only do it one time a round. Also, as a Player, you can't take some of your Move Action, then do your Standard Action, and then finish off with the rest of your Move.
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« Reply #223 on: July 22, 2008, 05:35:32 PM »

Quote from: Destructor on July 22, 2008, 04:26:56 PM

I think their special ability is considered a Minor Action, and as such they can only do it one time a round. Also, as a Player, you can't take some of your Move Action, then do your Standard Action, and then finish off with the rest of your Move.

Right.  Good catch on the minor action, so they could only shift once.  But my question would be, if the DS's shift was an interrupt for the paladin moving, has he completed his move yet, or can he keep moving?  Paladin moves 3 squares up to be adjacent to the DS.  The DS gets an immediate interrupt to shift away.  Paladin still has 2 squares of movement...can he keep going?  In theory he is still in his Movement action.  Or did the interrupt disrupt his movement?
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« Reply #224 on: July 22, 2008, 06:28:16 PM »

I'm going to say that no once the paladin ends his initial move then he can't move again unless he chooses to use his Standard as a Move action or spends an action point but that isn't really the problem.  I think the spirit of the Dragonshields shift move is to move after a player attempting to move out of melee range of the Dragonshield not for the Dragonshield to move away from the player.  I can see using it maybe if the Dragonshield was trying to flee but that may go against their normal tactics or disposition.
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hentzau
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« Reply #225 on: July 22, 2008, 06:42:34 PM »

Quote from: Rich on July 22, 2008, 06:28:16 PM

I'm going to say that no once the paladin ends his initial move then he can't move again unless he chooses to use his Standard as a Move action or spends an action point but that isn't really the problem.  I think the spirit of the Dragonshields shift move is to move after a player attempting to move out of melee range of the Dragonshield not for the Dragonshield to move away from the player.  I can see using it maybe if the Dragonshield was trying to flee but that may go against their normal tactics or disposition.

As I was using the Dragonshields when the Paladin charged into combat, they immediately backed away from the charge so he couldn't actually hit them, and then on their initiative move up to attack.  Of course, the Paladin could have just readied his attack action so that when they moved up he would take his attack, but the paladin didn't think of that.   icon_biggrin
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« Reply #226 on: July 22, 2008, 07:52:34 PM »

Went to the source, found the answer on the D&D forums.  GLad I wasn't the only one that was confused by this.

The crux of the matter comes down to the fact that the Dragonshield Tactics is an Immediate action, and you can only take one Immediate action in a round, then they get one shift.

If that paladin just moved up to attack, then once the Dragonshield shifts away, the paladin can follow, as long as he has movement.

If the paladin had Charged, however, he has to end his movement at the square that his charge stopped, and as such can't make a follow on move and attack unless he spends an action point.

Answer detail here.
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« Reply #227 on: July 22, 2008, 11:06:46 PM »

Quote from: Rich on July 22, 2008, 06:28:16 PM

I think the spirit of the Dragonshields shift move is to move after a player attempting to move out of melee range of the Dragonshield not for the Dragonshield to move away from the player.

That's how I've been using the rule - allowing the Dragonshield's to gain and/or press combat advantage. Though falling back from a charge is a pretty slick use, as well...  icon_twisted
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« Reply #228 on: July 23, 2008, 02:27:09 AM »

Quote from: CrayolaSmoker on July 22, 2008, 11:06:46 PM

Quote from: Rich on July 22, 2008, 06:28:16 PM

I think the spirit of the Dragonshields shift move is to move after a player attempting to move out of melee range of the Dragonshield not for the Dragonshield to move away from the player.
That's how I've been using the rule - allowing the Dragonshield's to gain and/or press combat advantage. Though falling back from a charge is a pretty slick use, as well...  icon_twisted

Note to self...  Tongue

No, I wouldn't metagame like that.
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« Reply #229 on: July 23, 2008, 04:06:07 AM »

Quote from: hentzau on July 22, 2008, 07:52:34 PM

Went to the source, found the answer on the D&D forums.  GLad I wasn't the only one that was confused by this.

The crux of the matter comes down to the fact that the Dragonshield Tactics is an Immediate action, and you can only take one Immediate action in a round, then they get one shift.

If that paladin just moved up to attack, then once the Dragonshield shifts away, the paladin can follow, as long as he has movement.

If the paladin had Charged, however, he has to end his movement at the square that his charge stopped, and as such can't make a follow on move and attack unless he spends an action point.

Answer detail here.

Not saying that's not the correct answer, but unfortunately the Customer Service guys aren't really anymore informed than anyone else.  I have seen many cases where customer service said one thing and then a designer actually said the opposite and all things considered I tend to listen to the designer over the customer service guys. There was a recent example where two people asked two different customer service guys if you could run when slowed.  One of them said yes, and the other said no, and both gave details as to why their answer was correct.  I do believe that the actual answer given by the Sage was yes you could.
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« Reply #230 on: July 23, 2008, 02:14:17 PM »

It would make sense that you could run when Slowed, because all running does is increase your movement by 2 (along with giving you a penalty somewhere for doing so). But on the flip side, you are slowed, so why can you run?

What a technical nightmare. No wonder there's so many little fixes already to the three source books. Especially the difficulty chart. What a mess.
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« Reply #231 on: July 23, 2008, 03:29:33 PM »

Well, most of the examples I was thinking of date back to the 3E days, so it's not just a 4E issue, but considering how 4E is a exceptions based game I suspect there will be more questions than there were in 3E days.  As for errata, take a look at the 3E errata - there's a LOT less for 4E, and the 3E stuff was still being errata'ed up until just before 4E came out (heck, I forget how many versions of polymorph there are now  Tongue) I don't really mind actually.  One of the key things about 4E is putting the power back into the groups' hands rather than trying to exhaustively spell out every possible rule which just turned the rules into bloat.  Basically, if your group feels it makes sense that you can run when slowed, then you can.  If your group doesn't, then you can't.  In either case, you're back to the play - the only issue becomes consistency between groups (which harkens back to 1st and 2nd Edition days).

All I meant by my original post is that in most cases Customer Service guys are just reading the rules and interpreting them based on their own feelings (just like me or you).  As such I don't really give their answer any more weight and an equally well thought out response from someone else.  Now, if James Wyatt or one of the other designers comes out and says "Well, the intention was..." then that has some weight to it for me.  I think the Sage responses on their website actually gets run by a designer before being published on the page (I could be wrong there) so when they say that all running does is let you more 2 extra squares and give you penalties and since slowed doesn't say you can't run, then I guess it's techically more fitting with the printed rules (and since I think they got designer review first, so also rules intent) then I guess that's what I'll use.
« Last Edit: July 23, 2008, 03:36:04 PM by IceBear » Logged
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« Reply #232 on: July 23, 2008, 06:07:40 PM »

Quote from: IceBear on July 23, 2008, 03:29:33 PM

All I meant by my original post is that in most cases Customer Service guys are just reading the rules and interpreting them based on their own feelings (just like me or you).  As such I don't really give their answer any more weight and an equally well thought out response from someone else.  Now, if James Wyatt or one of the other designers comes out and says "Well, the intention was..." then that has some weight to it for me.

I think the same way too, as you make a very good point. How exactly does it work behind the scenes? Who knows. But until then, you also make a good point - see which way the group decides on the decision, and just follow it that way afterwords.
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« Reply #233 on: July 23, 2008, 07:24:55 PM »

Quote
I think the same way too, as you make a very good point. How exactly does it work behind the scenes? Who knows. But until then, you also make a good point - see which way the group decides on the decision, and just follow it that way afterwords.

That's how we've been playing. We've run up against a lot of questions. We come to a quick consensus based on our gut "common sense" feeling, and continue playing. Often I'll research the question later, and if it turns out we're wrong (which we often are), then I'll announce it at the next game session and we'll do it the right way going forward.

People get way too hung up on the rules. D&D is about storytelling, roleplaying, and having fun. Unless you're in a tournament playing for prize money, whether you took 2 extra steps you technically shouldn't have been allowed to really doesn't matter much in the greater scheme of things. I do like to follow the rules, and make every attempt to play "correctly," but I'm not going to let it slow/stop our game session or lessen our fun.
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« Reply #234 on: July 23, 2008, 09:39:48 PM »

Quote from: YellowKing on July 23, 2008, 07:24:55 PM

Quote
I think the same way too, as you make a very good point. How exactly does it work behind the scenes? Who knows. But until then, you also make a good point - see which way the group decides on the decision, and just follow it that way afterwords.

That's how we've been playing. We've run up against a lot of questions. We come to a quick consensus based on our gut "common sense" feeling, and continue playing. Often I'll research the question later, and if it turns out we're wrong (which we often are), then I'll announce it at the next game session and we'll do it the right way going forward.

People get way too hung up on the rules. D&D is about storytelling, roleplaying, and having fun. Unless you're in a tournament playing for prize money, whether you took 2 extra steps you technically shouldn't have been allowed to really doesn't matter much in the greater scheme of things. I do like to follow the rules, and make every attempt to play "correctly," but I'm not going to let it slow/stop our game session or lessen our fun.

Well, yeah.  What I did in that situation, because we couldn't come to a quick decision, was pretty much throw out the Dragonshield Tactics ability for that encounter.  I told everyone that I didn't want to waste time trying to figure it out on the spot, so I just went ahead and got rid of it.  Made the fight a little easier, maybe, but they were getting pretty well hammered fairly quickly on, so it was fine with me.
« Last Edit: July 23, 2008, 09:53:08 PM by hentzau » Logged
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