http://gamingtrend.com
September 30, 2014, 11:19:20 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Will Console Microtransactions Hurt Gaming?  (Read 879 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Dante Rising
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2311


View Profile
« on: September 24, 2006, 04:08:33 AM »

Do any of you think that the new trend toward Microtransactions will have negative consequences for gaming? I cannot help but feel that we've opened a Pandora's Box with the introduction of this new sales method.

-Developer's will become increasingly pressured internally and by publishers to leave content out of games, so that a series of micro-content can be added later.  In my paranoid mind I had a terrible vision:  Once Activision announced that they successfully sold $1 million dollars of additional add-on maps for Call of Duty 2, I suddenly envisioned developers across the globe pulling quests out of RPGs, weapons and maps out of FPS, and cars and tracks out of racing games. They quietly gutted their games and then made nice, long lists of additional content, terming it as "gameplay enhancers".

-Used games will become less valuable because much of the content will not be on the game disc.

-People who don't have Internet or broadband connections will be forced into the position of playing crippled games.

These are just a few of the problems I recognize with microtransactions. Does anyone know if you can freely re-download a past transaction if your hard drives fails? Can you transfer them to other systems?

Logged
Turtle
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 9378



View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2006, 09:11:35 AM »

The main thing is, they're using microtransactions as simple money grubbing schemes by withholding content to release later.

Instead, they could have been exploring some more in depth uses of microtransactions.

This ties in somewhat with a small part of the game industry trying out episodic gaming.
Logged
Canuck
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 5474


I live in Japan


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2006, 10:09:38 AM »

The way I see it you only have yourself to blame if you buy addons.  If people stopped buying gutted games then I'm sure the developers would stop their little economic experimenting.
Logged
Doopri
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2853


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2006, 06:28:00 PM »

Quote
The way I see it you only have yourself to blame if you buy addons.  If people stopped buying gutted games then I'm sure the developers would stop their little economic experimenting.

Canuck this is the part that sucks - the group of gamers that hates the idea of the microtransaction DOESNT participate in the economic experiment.  The people who dont care buy into it anyway, and there isnt a thing anyone who detests the idea can do about it.  And the fact that "additional content" comes out after the fact means that I dont know which game is gutted or not when i get it (with the exception of say roster updates or cars / tracks in a racing game - we pretty much KNOW those are coming).
Logged
Big Jake
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 1300


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2006, 07:16:50 PM »

There's one loudmouthed jackass on these boards who has been bitching about microtransactions ever since he had to see one for a single player game.  icon_neutral
Logged

The price of great bacon is eternal vigilance.
Kevin Grey
Global Moderator
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13976


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2006, 07:30:21 PM »

Quote from: Doopri on September 24, 2006, 06:28:00 PM

Quote
The way I see it you only have yourself to blame if you buy addons.  If people stopped buying gutted games then I'm sure the developers would stop their little economic experimenting.

Canuck this is the part that sucks - the group of gamers that hates the idea of the microtransaction DOESNT participate in the economic experiment.  The people who dont care buy into it anyway, and there isnt a thing anyone who detests the idea can do about it.  And the fact that "additional content" comes out after the fact means that I dont know which game is gutted or not when i get it (with the exception of say roster updates or cars / tracks in a racing game - we pretty much KNOW those are coming).

Agreed.  This is one of those situations where I think general stupidity will be our downfall.  Despite all of the outrcy over the Horse Armor download, I recall Bethesda stating they still sold a ton of 'em.  I think a lot of people will protest loudly AND still end up buying the stuff.  And, in the end, commerce will win. 
Logged
kathode
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2469



View Profile
« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2006, 07:39:48 PM »

A game that is gutted for microtransactions still has to justify its initial price.  The larger barrier to entry by far is the $50+ sticker price rather than the $2 optional weapon, or whatever you want to imagine.  People conjuring up the image of a dystopian future of a la carte gaming are for some reason imagining themselves shelling out large amounts of money to acquire games with minimal amounts of content, a scenario I don't see happening. 
Logged
Knightshade Dragon
Administrator
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 21061



View Profile WWW
« Reply #7 on: September 24, 2006, 08:12:44 PM »

Quote from: kathode on September 24, 2006, 07:39:48 PM

A game that is gutted for microtransactions still has to justify its initial price.  The larger barrier to entry by far is the $50+ sticker price rather than the $2 optional weapon, or whatever you want to imagine.  People conjuring up the image of a dystopian future of a la carte gaming are for some reason imagining themselves shelling out large amounts of money to acquire games with minimal amounts of content, a scenario I don't see happening. 

Agreed.  I don't believe that we'll see devs shipping some bare-bones game with chunks missing.  Realistically, you know they had the extra missions for Splinter Cell complete before or shortly after the game shipped.  Should have have included them?  Maybe so, maybe not.  Either way, what was added easily justified the cost. 

My real worry is that we'll see items that alter the balance being introduced in multiplayer. 
Logged

Ron Burke
EiC, Director of Gaming Trend
Gamertag:
Gaming Trend
PS3 Tag: GamingTrend
Kevin Grey
Global Moderator
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 13976


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2006, 10:17:33 PM »

Quote from: Knightshade Dragon on September 24, 2006, 08:12:44 PM

Agreed.  I don't believe that we'll see devs shipping some bare-bones game with chunks missing.  Realistically, you know they had the extra missions for Splinter Cell complete before or shortly after the game shipped.  Should have have included them?  Maybe so, maybe not.  Either way, what was added easily justified the cost. 

Ugh, Splinter Cell.  I love the game but it's the perfect example here since the changes were so obvious- end of one mission:  "Okay, Sam next up is tracking down Philip Matisse".  Next mission briefing "Now that Matisse is taken care of we're sending you to China".  And then six months later all of that content that was obviously missing (and indeed even had footage from the cut levels showing up on the making of DVD in the initial release) shows up as exclusive downloadables via Xbox Live or an exclusive level in the PS2 version.   

Hell, it's not as bad since it was free, but the Wipeout devs admitted that all of the downloadable levels were ready and could have been included on the initial North American release of Wipeout Pure but they were puposely held back  in order to show off the downloadable content model for the PSP. 
Logged
EngineNo9
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 11098


I said good day, sir!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #9 on: September 24, 2006, 11:02:27 PM »

I also know that the infamous horse armor for Oblivion was planned and modelled well before release, since it was actually shown in a magazine that came out well before the game did.  The least they could have done is offer it as a free introductory incentive thing (but I don't think we need to beat that dead horse anymore).

Then look at the Lumines Live debacle, where you can't even play all of the standard levels in the game without downlading additional content packs.  Hopefully the release delay has something to do with a retooling of this crap, although I highly doubt it. 

And of course the hypothetical Gran Tourismo HD coming seriously stripped down and charging for all those hundreds of cars and tracks which used to be part of the standard package is causing understandable outrage.  If they do end up going with that sytsem I would almost bet money that the majority of content would come on the disc anyway and just have to be unlocked since it would take gigs of space (and lots of time) to download it onto a relatively limited hard drive.

As long as there are hardcore fans or completists around to download the content for these games this is going to continue and there isn't a damn thing I can personally do about it since my $4 won't be missed from the greater mass of income. 
Logged

Sandwiches do fix everything.
Kobra
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 3240


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: September 25, 2006, 01:46:41 AM »

Microtransactions are a VERY slippery slope that will lead to no good.  Wasn't Oblivion essentially the first game to open the floodgates for this?  I was very very critical of Oblivion for doing this due to the above cited, pre-modeled Horse Armor.  I can just picture some bean counter running in and going "Gee, if we leave that OUT of the game, we could make another 500K by selling it to completist suckers!".   I predicted on another forum this would open the floodgates for massive microtransaction, and specifically, abuse of that system.

The problem is this amounts to residual revenue streams for companies brought to you at the expense of the actual game itself under some conditions.  How much development time do they cut off the main product by shifting some of the "Things" in the game to microtransactions to be completed after release?

From a business standpoint, residual revenue is fantastic, from a consumer standpoint, it blows...  Worse, people have little willpower when it comes to small purchases - not realising that every dollar adds up. "Ohhh, shiney new item, only $1.99!, I am buying it."  This whole residual system is little more than an exploit of a weakness of the human mind.  I would never, ever buy one myself, I am too cheap, consider my boycott already in place.
Logged

All truth goes through three stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is
violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer
EddieA
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 6925


View Profile
« Reply #11 on: September 25, 2006, 05:22:21 AM »

For me, it comes down to what you get with the game.  Especially with Oblivion, there was way more than enough content out of the box to justify the price, so they can sell as many small add-ons as they want as far as I'm concerned.  Reviews and word of mouth are still going to be based on what comes with the game originally, so if there's not enough content, then that will be reflected in reviews and people's impressions of the game.  I don't really plan on paying for any of these microtransactions myself, but I don't think it's going to be a big problem.
Logged

"Why did the chicken cross the Mobius strip?  To get to the same side."  - The Big Bang Theory
Gratch
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 12494


GO UTES!!


View Profile
« Reply #12 on: September 25, 2006, 12:00:15 PM »

Quote from: Knightshade Dragon on September 24, 2006, 08:12:44 PM

don't believe that we'll see devs shipping some bare-bones game with chunks missing.

Then you have much more faith in developers than I do.  My gut feeling is that microtransactions are going to end up as a developer excuse to release unfinished games.  Don't have time to wrap up that last dungeon?  Make it a microtransaction.  Didn't have the extra month to properly balance the enemies?  Sell a more powerful weapon as an add-on.  They won't make it that obvious, of course (marketing message will be more along the lines of "Having trouble with Green Ghoulies?  Now chop through them in no time with the Goulie Fucker 2000!  Only $2.99!!!"), but you know that it's going to end up getting abused.  I'd like to think that we as gamers wouldn't stand for this and vote with our dollars, but you know that if the game is popular enough, people will buy it.

As was shown with what Sony proposed with GT, I think we're well on our way towards buying nothing but an interface and then paying for content.  Take something like a Pokemon game, for instance.  They sell the interface and a 'starter deck' for $25, then you pay $.99 per deck/card/whatever (not real familiar with Pokemon) after that.   Basically, you purchase the storefront that allows you to buy more stuff.  If marketed correctly, something like that would be a huge seller, and no amount of ranting or raving from us gamers would have any effect on it.

Unfortunately, we've let the beast in the door and there's no way to shoo it back out again.  We're stuck with microtransactions for better or worse, and I have the bad feeling it's going to be worse. 
Logged

“My next great decision is just lying in wait.
The action might turn out to be the world's most grievous mistake."
- Bad Religion, Past is Dead
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.107 seconds with 49 queries. (Pretty URLs adds 0.046s, 2q)