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Author Topic: Sony: Who needs marketshare?  (Read 1040 times)
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Destructor
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« on: June 05, 2006, 01:35:21 PM »

I can't believe I read this:

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The caterwauling between Sony and Nintendo will probably go back and forth for a while still, but it misses Sony's prime goal for the next generation.

"The name of the game is not market share, it's how fast we can grow the industry - our ambition is to grow 15 per cent a year on hardware and software if we can," Reeves told MCV.

"We want to try and double digital entertainment in the next five to six years. Whether we have 40, 50, or 60 per cent market share is not that important."

Uh...isn't marketshare the whole reason to be number one? Isn't it true that if you have the highest marketshare, that means that everybody develops titles for your console?

Apparently the entire reason the PS3 exists is for Sony to get Blu-Ray into everybody's homes. Not to play games.
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« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2006, 01:41:14 PM »

Marketshare is not important if you don't have real-time weapon switching and RIDGE RACER!!!!

Sony's just focusing on the essentials right now.

 Tongue
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« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2006, 02:16:13 PM »

Quote from: "Destructor"
Apparently the entire reason the PS3 exists is for Sony to get Blu-Ray into everybody's homes. Not to play games.


Which is exactly what Sony has been up front about from the get-go. The PS3 is a Blu-Ray player that can also play games. That's how they're marketing it: A cheap Blu-Ray DVD player. They so firmly believe that the future lies in Blu-Ray that they're willing to sacrifice the PS3 generation entirely to try to make this happen.
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« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2006, 03:02:00 PM »

Quote from: "Destructor"
I can't believe I read this:

Quote
The caterwauling between Sony and Nintendo will probably go back and forth for a while still, but it misses Sony's prime goal for the next generation.

"The name of the game is not market share, it's how fast we can grow the industry - our ambition is to grow 15 per cent a year on hardware and software if we can," Reeves told MCV.

"We want to try and double digital entertainment in the next five to six years. Whether we have 40, 50, or 60 per cent market share is not that important."

Uh...isn't marketshare the whole reason to be number one? Isn't it true that if you have the highest marketshare, that means that everybody develops titles for your console?

Apparently the entire reason the PS3 exists is for Sony to get Blu-Ray into everybody's homes. Not to play games.


sounds to me as though he is covering his ass ,for when the ps3 goes tits up :lol:
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« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2006, 03:21:29 PM »

Quote from: "whiteboyskim"
Quote from: "Destructor"
Apparently the entire reason the PS3 exists is for Sony to get Blu-Ray into everybody's homes. Not to play games.

Which is exactly what Sony has been up front about from the get-go. The PS3 is a Blu-Ray player that can also play games. That's how they're marketing it: A cheap Blu-Ray DVD player. They so firmly believe that the future lies in Blu-Ray that they're willing to sacrifice the PS3 generation entirely to try to make this happen.

So, I have to ask this - is this wise at all? Can Sony honestly believe that this is a good idea?

Sony isn't like Microsoft - they don't have the cash reserves to keep on going like this if the PS3 utterly tanks, as they don't have the sales from an OS that 99% of the world uses to back them up.
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« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2006, 03:24:01 PM »

Sony probably believes it's a wonderful idea.

In reality, it's not.  And it won't be very good for gaming in the long run, either.
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« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2006, 04:29:38 PM »

At this point, I'm seriously asking "What's Blu Ray"? What is so innovative and GREAT about it?

I'm honestly baffled their placing so much hope into it, when it's so far from being mainstream. DVD hit mainstream pretty damn quick, I don't think Blu Ray or HD-DVD are anywhere near that status yet - everyone just finished buying their DVD systems!
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« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2006, 06:53:01 PM »

Quote
At this point, I'm seriously asking "What's Blu Ray"? What is so innovative and GREAT about it?

Doesn't blue-ray have more movie studios behind it then HD-DVD?  If that's the case, why won't blue ray win?  The PS3 may be carried along with blue ray.
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« Reply #8 on: June 05, 2006, 07:30:32 PM »

Blu-Ray technology has one legitimate advantage over HD-DVD media: the discs can hold significantly more information.  This would theoretically allow for studios to maximize the video quality without having to sacrifice special features like commentary tracks and behind-the-scenes documentaries.

The biggest downside to the technology is that its marketed by Sony: a company so draconian in their copy protection schemes and so uncompromising in their pursuit of profits that they produce music CDs that install rootkit viruses in your PC and once teamed up with LucasFilm and Circuit City to push DivX players which would require home users to pay money everytime they wanted to watch a movie they owned.  

One popular rumor suggests that PlayStation 3 games will hardcode themselves to the first machine they're put into, becoming unplayable on all other PS3 consoles and eliminating the sale of used games, game rentals, and even loaning games out to friends.  Sony flatly denies any such feature, but the reason the rumor persists is that it's *exactly* the sort of thing Sony would push out onto the marketplace.  This company wants to establish a stranglehold on the world of digital media, and they're fully prepared to redefine the concept of "ownership" to get it done.

I own a PlayStation 2.  My television, DVD player, and camcorder are all from Sony because my research indicated they were the best in their fields for what I wanted to do.  I think that when Sony embraces an established electronic standard, they're frequently able to do it better than most of their competitors.  What I *don't* trust is their attempts to create new standards, especially one that they would retain exclusive rights over.

I'm really hoping HD-DVD is the next standard of choice.

-Autistic Angel
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« Reply #9 on: June 05, 2006, 07:30:56 PM »

Quote from: "Scott"
Quote
At this point, I'm seriously asking "What's Blu Ray"? What is so innovative and GREAT about it?

Doesn't blue-ray have more movie studios behind it then HD-DVD?  If that's the case, why won't blue ray win?  The PS3 may be carried along with blue ray.


1) Blu-Ray is different than HD-DVD because of the lasers used to write to DVD media. HD-DVD uses red lasers and Blu-Ray uses, naturally, Blue ones. The shortest explanation I've read about the differences is that Blu-Ray has a massive storage capacity increase over HD-DVD but the visual/audio quality differences are so minute that only the hardest of the hard core would demand one format over the other. So if you have one format that's a hell of a lot cheaper than the other and you can put out two HD-DVD discs worth of data that can fit on one Blu-Ray disc and still do it for half the price... what's the benefit to Blu-Ray again?

2) I think the studios are banking more on Sony's marketshare ironically enough, and they have little to no first-hand knowledge about how the gaming industry works. Out of all industries, the film industry tends to be the most incestuous and insular of them all. The result is an industry fairly clueless in regards to how things work outside of Hollywood. That by itself is nothing new because you can go back 70+ years and find Hollywood mocking that very aspect of itself in, wait for it... it's own product. Since Sony has come right out and said they don't care about marketshare and all they do care about is forcing Blu-Ray on the public, you might even begin to see these ill-informed studio executives begin to understand just how badly Sony is screwing everyone. When Sony says, "We're screwing all of you and you'll enjoy it because we said so" in MarketingSpeak, then that's going to get the attention of the right people in the industry. The result of which is:

3) Blu-Ray becomes the BetaMax of the next generation while HD DVD in general becomes the LaserDisc2K6 a lot of us think of it as. Not a single damn consumer anywhere wants "the next best thing" to DVD when things look, physically mind you, exactly the same. The discs and packaging themselves look pretty much the same, so how is this different than what I already have? Consider how long VHS held onto the market with a vice grip, and consider just how fast DVD made VHS irrelevant (less than 10 years). When DVDs are feature-packed, inexpensive, and look dazzling on a solid television, you again have no reason to upgrade to the new systems just yet even if:

4) HD TVs are NOT the standard/norm/common place that enthusiasts would have you believe. The prices are coming down and within the next five years you will see a far greater adopting of this, but it is not the standard yet. How many top of the line HD sets have the Blu-Ray component already installed in them? This might be where I'm wrong so please correct me if necessary but I understood it to only be on HD sets made in the last year or so and all sets going forward. Now, an HD set appearing in every house in America will not happen overnight despite what Sony and other tech industry companies think.

The result of all of this? I think high-def DVDs are about to fall flat on their collective faces, I think the PS3 is going to roll over and die at retail strangled by its own price tag, and I think the 85% of us that are not early adopters are going to send Nintendo's stock through the roof courtesy of the Wii. smile
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« Reply #10 on: June 05, 2006, 08:23:09 PM »

Quote from: "whiteboyskim"
4) HD TVs are NOT the standard/norm/common place that enthusiasts would have you believe. The prices are coming down and within the next five years you will see a far greater adopting of this, but it is not the standard yet. How many top of the line HD sets have the Blu-Ray component already installed in them? This might be where I'm wrong so please correct me if necessary but I understood it to only be on HD sets made in the last year or so and all sets going forward. Now, an HD set appearing in every house in America will not happen overnight despite what Sony and other tech industry companies think.


HDTVs are projected to outsell conventional TVs this year.  While it will still be several years before HDTVs are the standard in homes, they are already pretty much the standard for anyone purchasing a new TV.

There is no such thing as the "Bluray component."  What you are referring to is HDMI with HDCP  connection and it's a standard that is supported by Bluray, HD-DVD, and pretty much every up and coming device that will deliver HD content (Tivos, cable boxes, upconverting DVD players, etc).  *If* movie studios choose to enable the flag then it can stop these devices from enabling HD resolution if not connected via HDMI connection.  This isn't unique to Bluray- HD-DVD has the exact same potential issue.  HDMI has been availble for a lot longer than a year but it is still a concern to many HDTV early adopters (including myself) however recent indications are that studios have possibly decided to delay implementation of the flag until 2010 and maybe even indefinitely due to consumer concerns over the technology. It doesn't help the studios' cause that Japan has actually outlawed use of the flag until something like 2011.  It's still a concern, but less so than at the beginning of the year, and hopefully will be a non-issue by this time next year.
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« Reply #11 on: June 05, 2006, 08:29:56 PM »

Quote from: "Autistic Angel"
Blu-Ray technology has one legitimate advantage over HD-DVD media: the discs can hold significantly more information.  This would theoretically allow for studios to maximize the video quality without having to sacrifice special features like commentary tracks and behind-the-scenes documentaries.


HD-DVDs can hold 15 GB single-layer/ 30 GB dual layer. BluRay is 25 GB single-layer and 50 GB dual-layer.  

Quote
The biggest downside to the technology is that its marketed by Sony: a company so draconian in their copy protection schemes and so uncompromising in their pursuit of profits that they produce music CDs that install rootkit viruses in your PC and once teamed up with LucasFilm and Circuit City to push DivX players which would require home users to pay money everytime they wanted to watch a movie they owned.  


In Divx's defense, it was meant to be an alternative  to renting titles. It's not like you had to buy a Divx disk for $30 dollars and pay a fee every time you watched it. You could buy a movie for $5 dollars which would allow yout to watch it for a set amount of time and then throw the disk out or pay another fee later.

Besides, I can't find any references that link Sony to the development of  Divx. I even found a couple of references to Sony actively campaigning against the format.

Quote
One popular rumor suggests that PlayStation 3 games will hardcode themselves to the first machine they're put into, becoming unplayable on all other PS3 consoles and eliminating the sale of used games, game rentals, and even loaning games out to friends.  Sony flatly denies any such feature, but the reason the rumor persists is that it's *exactly* the sort of thing Sony would push out onto the marketplace.  This company wants to establish a stranglehold on the world of digital media, and they're fully prepared to redefine the concept of "ownership" to get it done.


Sony has said many times that the PS3 will not include any DRM that locks a game disk to a specific console.

Quote
I own a PlayStation 2.  My television, DVD player, and camcorder are all from Sony because my research indicated they were the best in their fields for what I wanted to do.  I think that when Sony embraces an established electronic standard, they're frequently able to do it better than most of their competitors.  What I *don't* trust is their attempts to create new standards, especially one that they would retain exclusive rights over.

I'm really hoping HD-DVD is the next standard of choice.


HD-DVD and BluRay will have essentially the same DRM embedded in it. Both BluRay and HD-DVD implement AACS, an ecryption standard ldeveloped by Sony (BluRay), Toshiba (HD-DVD) and all of the major movie studios.
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« Reply #12 on: June 06, 2006, 01:40:32 AM »

In a few years, Devil will be making fun of Sony by stating "Well, at least Sony is making money".

Assuming they actually ARE making money, of course.
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metallicorphan
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« Reply #13 on: June 06, 2006, 08:29:46 AM »

okay i know that blu-ray,is meant to be able to hold more data...but how big do we want our games?

i want them massive,LOL.......a lot of games that come out today dont even take full advantage of DVDs(dead or alive..or similar games i have in mind)...whereas,oblivion...did seem to take full advantage of the DVD...and for some bizare reason,some people complained that the game was too big!!
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