http://gamingtrend.com
November 28, 2014, 04:40:08 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Question about consoles and online service  (Read 728 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
ioticus
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 74



View Profile
« on: July 15, 2007, 08:37:36 PM »

I have a gaming PC hooked up to a cable internet connection via Comcast.  I'm thinking of getting a console but want to know if I need another cable internet connection in order to use the 360 or PS3 online services?  I have an HDTV that I want to use for the console.  Does the online service come thru the HDTV cable TV connection or do I need a separate internet cable connection for that?  What options do I have?
Logged
Soulchilde
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 5291


You and I have unfinished business


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2007, 08:54:00 PM »

The next gen console all support wifi.  All  you would need a wireless router and you should be good to go
Logged

Quote from: Devil on January 12, 2007, 01:14:38 AM

NiM$
ioticus
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 74



View Profile
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2007, 08:57:29 PM »

Quote from: Soulchilde on July 15, 2007, 08:54:00 PM

The next gen console all support wifi.  All  you would need a wireless router and you should be good to go

You mean I can use my computer's connection for the console by using a router for the computer?
Logged
IkeVandergraaf
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 2784


RRoD FTL! F MS!


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2007, 09:03:27 PM »

Yes, you would need a router, either wireless or wired, depending on your preference.  I know the 360 supports both although you'd have to buy a wireless bridge for the 360 if you wanted to go that route.  I don't know about the other consoles, but I assume they're the same.  The 360 has the best online component, to my understanding.
Logged

Gamertag = IkeV
I KNOW DEEP IN MY NMIND THAT THIS DISGUSTING WEBSITE THAT IS OBIVOUSLY OPERATED BY HIGHSCHOOL DROPOUTS LIVING PURPOSELESS AND JOBLESS LIVES
CeeKay
Gaming Trend Staff
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 71766


La-bibbida-bibba-dum! La-bibbida-bibba-do!


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2007, 11:55:12 PM »

the 360 requires a wireless adapter, while the PS3 (other than the 20 gig version) and the Wii do not as they have it out of the box.  Maybe MS will get smart and put WiFi in the 'Falcon'.
Logged

Because I can,
also because I don't care what you want.
XBL: OriginalCeeKay
Wii U: CeeKay
disarm
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 4189


my moral standing is lying down...


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2007, 03:49:21 PM »

Quote from: CeeKay on July 15, 2007, 11:55:12 PM

the 360 requires a wireless adapter, while the PS3 (other than the 20 gig version) and the Wii do not as they have it out of the box.  Maybe MS will get smart and put WiFi in the 'Falcon'.

just to clarify, you only need a wireless adapter for the 360 if you want a wireless connection.  the 360 has an ethernet port on the back if you don't mind connecting with a cable.  you'll need some kind of router in either case though.
Logged

*Gamertag - disarm78*
Now Playing: Grand Theft Auto V
Purge
Gaming Trend Staff
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 18616



View Profile WWW
« Reply #6 on: July 16, 2007, 04:21:10 PM »

Quote from: ioticus on July 15, 2007, 08:37:36 PM

if I need another cable internet connection in order to use the 360 or PS3 online services?

No. Your existing internet connection should be sufficient. Would you need CABLES to hook it up? Yes. And a place to plug it in if you don't have a router.

Quote from: ioticus on July 15, 2007, 08:37:36 PM

Does the online service come thru the HDTV cable TV connection or do I need a separate internet cable connection for that?
You use the internet connection that your PC uses.

Quote from: ioticus on July 15, 2007, 08:37:36 PM

What options do I have?
This means either wirelessly (which can be kind of a pain to set up "the right way"), or via an ethernet cable.

Here's the big picture : Your HDTV and it's connections are unimportant to the internet connection, so the only thing you need to worry about in your home theatre is the video/audio/power.

Your internet connection relies on a connection between your console (360/ps3) and the cable/DSL modem itself. That's not to say that they need to be plugged in directly, but that a connection does need to exist. IF you have a wireless router in place and don't feel like running network cable, feel free to connect it that way. There's tweaks, security concerns and all kinds of unhappy frustration that lies in wait there. I'm not trying to dissuade you from this path if this is where your heart is set, but it CAN be frustrating, and you may not get the network performance that you can get from just running a network cable.

The network cable would go from the console to a connecting router/bridge, whichever you have set up. If the system is using DHCP & NAT (network Address Translation) which most out-of-the-box routers have, then that may be all you need to do to get online.

If you DON'T have one, you can save money by connecting it to your PC itself if it has more than one network port; Windows XP & Vista both have the ability to "bridge" internet connections. Comcast may be already be providing you with multiple IP addresses anyways. The one caveat is that your PC will need to be on when you want to go online with your console.

My personal recommendation:
Unless it's cumbersome and impossible to do (or you have wife/GF issues with having on-more-effen-cord-back-there-and-I'm-leaving-you) I'd say run CAT-5 network cable to wherever you're putting your console, and plug it into a NAT router, and the PC should also be plugged into the router. Your internet connection goes into the router's WAN port and you'll be fine (and protect your entire home network). This solution will also allow the best, most reliable and secure communication INSIDE your home network, so you can do stuff like listen to your MP3 music through your console, or watch videos. There may be a little bit of work in setting it up, we'd be more than happy to help you along.

The next best is the same setup except wireless; this is only if it's important to have some portability in your home (such as moving your console to different sets in the house) and some of them are incapable of getting network cables there. This system has encryption and security challenges, as well as interference issues that can drive someone bats**t-loco. slywink Sometimes it's easy though, so if this is your path, don't dread it too much.

We'll help you out either way. So what's your current setup? Which console are you looking at getting?
Logged

"If it weren't for Philo T. Farnsworth, inventor of television, we'd still be eating frozen radio dinners." - Johnny Carson
CeeKay
Gaming Trend Staff
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 71766


La-bibbida-bibba-dum! La-bibbida-bibba-do!


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: July 16, 2007, 04:25:32 PM »

Quote from: disarm on July 16, 2007, 03:49:21 PM

Quote from: CeeKay on July 15, 2007, 11:55:12 PM

the 360 requires a wireless adapter, while the PS3 (other than the 20 gig version) and the Wii do not as they have it out of the box.  Maybe MS will get smart and put WiFi in the 'Falcon'.

just to clarify, you only need a wireless adapter for the 360 if you want a wireless connection.  the 360 has an ethernet port on the back if you don't mind connecting with a cable.  you'll need some kind of router in either case though.

I also should have added that the Wii doesn't have an ethernet port-  you would need to get an adapter for it should you decide to get a Wii with a wired network.
Logged

Because I can,
also because I don't care what you want.
XBL: OriginalCeeKay
Wii U: CeeKay
ioticus
Gaming Trend Reader

Offline Offline

Posts: 74



View Profile
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2007, 01:47:00 AM »

Quote from: Purge on July 16, 2007, 04:21:10 PM



We'll help you out either way. So what's your current setup? Which console are you looking at getting?

Thanks for the detailed response.

I have an ASUS Deluxe motherboard that has an antenna that sends a wireless signal to another older computer in an adjacent room so it can share an internet connection.  It also has a cable modem with no router.  I know my computer has to be on to send a signal to the other computer.  Are you saying with a router the computer does not need to be on to send a signal to another computer or a console?  It doesn't seem feasible to connect a wire from my computer to a console which will be across a hall and about 30 feet away in another room, so I'm thinking of going wireless.  I'm thinking of getting the 360 when the new falcons come out in a few months (hopefully).
Logged
Purge
Gaming Trend Staff
Gaming Trend Senior Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 18616



View Profile WWW
« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2007, 05:58:44 PM »

The wireless router would basically replace your older computer in it's role. The thing is, then you will have a device dedicated to managing your network which will also use less power than your old PC. This is how I'd recommend you set it up:

INTERNET ---cable---> ROUTER --cable--> OLD PC
                                     |
                                     |
                                      -- wireless --> new PC
                                     |
                                     |
                                      -- wireless --> 360 + wireless adapter (if Falcon doesn't come with it built in)

If you are adventurous, you could always run the CAT5 through the walls and under the floor (or in the ceiling) and make nice wall-jacks behind your TV / computer areas and skip the wireless security/interference/bandwidth issues.

Configuring the ROUTER for secure access has three important steps.
1) Get everything working FIRST
2) then lock down the wireless access to MAC addresses and THEN test it.
3) enable WEP or WPA (WEP isn't as secure, but is more widely supported) and test.

If 3 fails, just roll back to 2.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2007, 06:00:23 PM by Purge » Logged

"If it weren't for Philo T. Farnsworth, inventor of television, we'd still be eating frozen radio dinners." - Johnny Carson
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.072 seconds with 43 queries. (Pretty URLs adds 0.012s, 2q)